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Author Wi, Y.M.; Peck, K.R.
Title Biliary sepsis caused by Ochrobactrum anthropi Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal Jpn J Infect Dis
Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 444-446
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology; Bacteremia/microbiology/physiopathology; Bile Duct Diseases/*microbiology/physiopathology; Catheter-Related Infections/microbiology/physiopathology; Female; Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/*complications/microbiology/physiopathology; Humans; Male; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Middle Aged; Ochrobactrum anthropi/drug effects/*isolation & purification/pathogenicity; Sepsis/*microbiology/physiopathology
Abstract Ochrobactrum anthropi is an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients, with the majority of human cases being central venous catheter-related infections. In contrast, O. anthropi-related biliary sepsis is much rare. Herein we report the clinical and microbiological characteristics of O. anthropi-related biliary sepsis in order to increase awareness of the potential role of O. anthropi in this infection. Further extensive epidemiologic studies should be carried out to ascertain the etiologic association between O. anthropi and biliary sepsis and to identify potential hosts and routes of transmission.
Address Division of Infectious Diseases, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1344-6304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21099098 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100504
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Author Westermann, S.A.; Pahlplatz, P.V.M.; Brouwers, M.A.M.
Title Timeline of cellulitis and late development of hydrothorax induced by a right-sided central venous catheter: report of a case Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Abbreviated Journal JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr
Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 341-343
Keywords Adult; Breast Diseases/diagnostic imaging/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects; Cellulitis/diagnostic imaging/*etiology; Female; Humans; Hydrothorax/diagnostic imaging/*etiology; Osmolar Concentration; Parenteral Nutrition/*adverse effects; Radiography; Vena Cava, Superior/*injuries/pathology
Abstract We reported a case of 27-year-old woman who suffered a hydrothorax induced by a central venous catheter that had been placed to facilitate parenteral nutrition. The central venous catheter was inserted into the superior vena cava through the right subclavian vein. Chest radiograph after insertion revealed proper position of the tip. After a few days, the patient developed acute cellulitis of the right breast, and intravenous antibiotics were started. Four days later, 10 days after the insertion of the catheter, the patient suddenly developed dyspnea and tachycardia. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed massive pleural effusion in the right thorax and a mediastinal shift; the tip of the catheter had perforated the superior vena cava and was located in the right pleural space. Thoracic and subcutaneous drainage showed a fluid similar to parenteral nutrition. The continuous mechanical force of the catheter tip against the superior vena cava wall in combination with a hyperosmolar solution was considered to be the cause of the acute cellulitis and a delayed hydrothorax.
Address Department of Surgery, Deventer Hospital, Deventer, The Netherlands. s.a.westermann@dz.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-6071 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20467016 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100503
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Author West, T.B.; West, D.W.; Ohene-Frempong, K.
Title The presentation, frequency, and outcome of bacteremia among children with sickle cell disease and fever Type Journal Article
Year 1994 Publication Pediatric Emergency Care Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Emerg Care
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 141-143
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Anemia, Sickle Cell/*complications; Bacteremia/*complications/diagnosis/epidemiology; Blood/microbiology; Child, Preschool; Fever/*complications; Humans; Infant; Philadelphia/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Retrospective Studies
Abstract All patients with positive blood cultures who were admitted to our children's hospital for sickle cell disease and fever over a 27-month period underwent chart review. Of 517 admissions, there were 10 (1.9%) positive blood cultures. These occurred more frequently in children less than two years old and in children with indwelling central venous catheters. All but one would have been considered at high risk for bacteremia at admission owing to an ill appearance, a focus of infection, or a central venous catheter in place. The one patient with a positive blood culture who did not have one of these three criteria had a benign hospital course on parenteral antibiotics with blood cultures turning negative within one day of presentation. Outpatient management strategies with antibiotics in selected children with sickle cell disease and fever merit further study.
Address Division of Hematology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA 19104
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-5161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:8058556 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100502
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Author West, M.A.; Moore, E.E.; Shapiro, M.B.; Nathens, A.B.; Cuschieri, J.; Johnson, J.L.; Harbrecht, B.G.; Minei, J.P.; Bankey, P.E.; Maier, R.V.
Title Inflammation and the host response to injury, a large-scale collaborative project: patient-oriented research core--standard operating procedures for clinical care VII--Guidelines for antibiotic administration in severely injured patients Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication The Journal of Trauma Abbreviated Journal J Trauma
Volume 65 Issue 6 Pages 1511-1519
Keywords Algorithms; Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Bacterial Infections/diagnosis/*drug therapy/microbiology; Bacteriological Techniques; Cross Infection/diagnosis/*drug therapy/microbiology; Decision Support Techniques; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Intensive Care Units; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Multiple Trauma/complications/*drug therapy/microbiology/surgery; Sepsis/diagnosis/*drug therapy/microbiology
Abstract When the clinical decision to treat a critically ill patient with antibiotics has been made, one must attempt to identify the site of infection based on clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory or diagnostic radiology studies. Identification of site requires, examination of patient, inspection of all wounds, chest radiograph, and calculation of clinical pulmonary infection score if ventilated, obtaining blood cultures, urinalysis, and line change if clinical suspicion of central venous catheter (CVC) source. If it is impossible to identify site, obtain cultures from all accessible suspected sites and initiate empiric, broad spectrum antibiotics. If likely site can be identified answer these questions: Is intra-abdominal site suspected? Is pulmonary source of infection suspected? Is skin, skin structure or soft tissue site suspected? If yes, does the patient have clinical signs suspicion for necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI)? Is a CVC infection suspected? Risk factors for more complicated infections are discussed and specific antibiotic recommendations are provided for each type and severity of clinical infection. Decision to continue, discontinue and/or alter antibiotic/antimicrobial treatment should be based on the clinical response to treatment, diagnostic or interventional findings, and culture and sensitivity data, bearing in mind that not all patients with infections will have positive cultures because of limitations of specimen handling, microbiology laboratory variations, time between specimen acquisition and culture, or presence of effective antibiotics at the time that specimens were obtained. It should also be noted that not all patients with increased temperature/WBC have an infection. Discontinuation of antibiotics is appropriate if cultures and other diagnostic studies are negative.
Address Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94110, USA. michael.west@ucsf.edu
Corporate Author Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury Collaborative Research Program Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-5282 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19077651 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100501
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Author Wesenberg, F.; Flaatten, H.; Janssen, C.W.J.
Title Central venous catheter with subcutaneous injection port (Port-A-Cath): 8 years clinical follow up with children Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Hematol Oncol
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 233-239
Keywords Adolescent; Blood Specimen Collection/instrumentation; Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects/*instrumentation; *Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; Equipment Contamination/statistics & numerical data; Equipment Failure/statistics & numerical data; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Hemorrhage/etiology; Humans; Infant; Infection/etiology; Injections, Subcutaneous/instrumentation; Male; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Thrombosis/etiology
Abstract Long-term intermittent venous access was established in 77 children by means of a central venous catheter (CVC) with a subcutaneous injection port (Port-A-Cath; PAC). Seventy of these children were included in this follow-up study. Sixty-three were treated for different malignant diseases, five for cystic fibrosis, one for severe hemophilia and one for central nervous system disease with seizures as the main problem. As of April, 1992, PACs had been in place for 3/12 to 8 3/12 years (cumulative 175 5/12 years) with 2,206 entries into the system. The PACs were used for blood sampling and administration of chemotherapy, antibiotics, fluids, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and blood products. Portal infection was observed in four patients of which two patients had their PAC removed. Catheter dislocation was observed in two and catheter breakage in one. Portal occlusion, extravasation, thrombosis leading to removal of the PAC or other technical or psychological complications were not observed. The children continued normal activities, and the easy venous access decreased emotional stress during treatment. Local doctors were trained to use PACs, through which they administered maintenance chemotherapy. We conclude that long-time use of PACs in children is safe and has many advantages compared to traditional CVCs in use. Strict indications, meticulous implantation techniques and adequate handling are, however, mandatory.
Address Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-0018 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:8217538 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100500
Permanent link to this record