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Author Yamada, M.; Nakai, K.; Yamamichi, K.; Komai, H.; Yoshioka, K.; Kon, M.
Title [A Successfully Treated Case of Central Venous Catheter-Related Suppurative Thrombophlebitis of the Right Jugular Vein to the Superior Vena Cava Associated with Esophageal Cancer] Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Gan to Kagaku Ryoho. Cancer & Chemotherapy Abbreviated Journal Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
Volume 42 Issue 7 Pages 855-857
Keywords Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/etiology/*therapy; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; Cisplatin/administration & dosage; Combined Modality Therapy; Esophageal Neoplasms/complications/*therapy; Female; Fluorouracil/administration & dosage; Humans; Jugular Veins/*pathology; Middle Aged; Thrombophlebitis/etiology/*therapy; Vena Cava, Superior/*pathology
Abstract A 63 year-woman was diagnosed with esophageal cancer (Mt. T4N2M0, c-Stage IIIC) after full examination. She underwent chemotherapy with 5-FU+CDDP (FP) through a central venous line (CV). She developed a fever of more than 40 degrees C 15 days after the first course of chemotherapy. We removed the CV owing to suspicion of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) and initiated treatment with antibiotics (CFPM). Even so, she experienced swelling from the right cervix to the precordium. We confirmed suppurative thrombophlebitis from the right jugular vein to the superior vena cava by CT and blood culture. After anti-coagulation therapy, venous thrombosis diminished and inflammation was cured. The patient continued to receive chemotherapy, underwent a bypass operation, and completed chemo-radiotherapy successfully while receiving anti-coagulation therapy.
Address Dept. of Surgery, Kansai Medical University
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Japanese Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0385-0684 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26197749 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100524
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Author Yague-Munoz, A.; Gregori-Roig, P.; Valls-Lopez, S.; Pantoja-Martinez, J.
Title [Ochrobactrum anthropi bacteremia in a child with cystic fibrosis] Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiologia Clinica Abbreviated Journal Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin
Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 137-138
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/complications/*microbiology; Catheter-Related Infections/complications/*microbiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Cholecystitis/complications/microbiology; Cystic Fibrosis/*complications; Disease Susceptibility; Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/complications/*microbiology; Humans; Infusions, Intravenous; Male; Ochrobactrum anthropi/*isolation & purification; Pseudomonas Infections/complications/drug therapy; Respiratory Tract Infections/complications/drug therapy; Tobramycin/administration & dosage/therapeutic use
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title Bacteriemia por Ochrobactrum anthropi en un nino con fibrosis quistica
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0213-005X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19811858 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100523
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Author Yagupsky, P.; Nolte, F.S.
Title Quantitative aspects of septicemia Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Clinical Microbiology Reviews Abbreviated Journal Clin Microbiol Rev
Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 269-279
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteria/*growth & development; Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects; Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects; Colony Count, Microbial; Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis/microbiology; Humans; Prognosis; Sepsis/diagnosis/drug therapy/*microbiology
Abstract For years, quantitative blood cultures found only limited use as aids in the diagnosis and management of septic patients because the available methods were cumbersome, labor intensive, and practical only for relatively small volumes of blood. The development and subsequent commercial availability of lysis-centrifugation direct plating methods for blood cultures have addressed many of the shortcomings of the older methods. The lysis-centrifugation method has demonstrated good performance relative to broth-based blood culture methods. As a result, quantitative blood cultures have found widespread use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Most episodes of clinical significant bacteremia in adults are characterized by low numbers of bacteria per milliliter of blood. In children, the magnitude of bacteremia is generally much higher, with the highest numbers of bacteria found in the blood of septic neonates. The magnitude of bacteremia correlates with the severity of disease in children and with mortality rates in adults, but other factors play more important roles in determining the patient's outcome. Serial quantitative blood cultures have been used to monitor the in vivo efficacy of antibiotic therapy in patients with slowly resolving sepsis, such as disseminated Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex infections. Quantitative blood culture methods were used in early studies of bacterial endocarditis, and the results significantly contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. Comparison of paired quantitative blood cultures obtained from a peripheral vein and the central venous catheter has been used to help identify patients with catheter-related sepsis and is the only method that does not require removal of the catheter to establish the diagnosis. Quantitation of bacteria in the blood can also help distinguish contaminated from truly positive blood cultures; however, no quantitative criteria can invariably differentiate contamination from bacteremia.
Address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York 14642
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0893-8512 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:2200606 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100522
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Author Wu, P.-S.; Lu, C.-Y.; Chang, L.-Y.; Hsueh, P.-R.; Lee, P.-I.; Chen, J.-M.; Lee, C.-Y.; Chan, P.-C.; Chang, P.-Y.; Yang, T.-T.; Huang, L.-M.
Title Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia in pediatric patients-- a 10-year analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection = Wei Mian yu gan ran za zhi Abbreviated Journal J Microbiol Immunol Infect
Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 144-149
Keywords Adolescent; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology; Bacteremia/epidemiology/*microbiology/mortality; Catheterization, Central Venous; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/epidemiology/*microbiology/mortality; Hospitals, University; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Male; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neoplasms/complications; Risk Factors; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia/*isolation & purification; Taiwan; Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/pharmacology
Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia is an important cause of mortality among immunocompromised children. However, there has been little information concerning S. maltophilia bacteremia in the pediatric population. METHODS: We reviewed the drug susceptibility of bloodstream isolates of S. maltophilia and medical charts of S. maltophilia bacteremia patients less than 18 years old at the Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital from January 1993 to June 2003. The risk factors associated with mortality of the patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia were analyzed. RESULTS: In total, 32 episodes (31 patients) of S. maltophilia bacteremia were reviewed. The average rate of nosocomial bloodstream infection was 8.3 episodes per 100,000 patient-days, and an average of 6.4% of them were caused by S. maltophilia. Malignancy was the most common underlying disease (32%). Six episodes of S. maltophilia bacteremia had soft tissue involvement, and only 1 of them underwent surgical intervention and survived. These 32 isolates were most susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (91%), and no obvious increase in multidrug resistance was noted in the previous 10 years. The crude mortality rate was 40.6%. Malignancy, failure to remove central venous catheter, and ineffective antibiotic treatment were significant risk factors for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Early and effective antimicrobial therapy and removal of central venous catheter as soon as possible are vital for the successful management of S. maltophilia bacteremia.
Address Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1684-1182 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16604247 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100521
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Author Wu, H.; Wu, Z.; Jin, D.; Xu, J.
Title [Nosocomial catheter-related sepsis secondary to central venous catheters] Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese Journal of Surgery] Abbreviated Journal Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
Volume 37 Issue 11 Pages 651-653
Keywords Amikacin/pharmacology; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*pharmacology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Cross Infection/drug therapy/*microbiology; Drug Resistance, Microbial; Female; Gram-Negative Aerobic Bacteria/drug effects/isolation & purification; Gram-Positive Cocci/drug effects/isolation & purification; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Retrospective Studies; Sepsis/drug therapy/*etiology; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*isolation & purification; Staphylococcus epidermidis/drug effects/isolation & purification; Vancomycin/*pharmacology
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To study bacteria and drug sensitivity of catheter-related sepsis (CRS). METHODS: Between February 1993 and December 1997, 52 patients with central venous catheter-related sepsis were studied retrospectively. RESULTS: The most common organisms were staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcus epidermis. The bacterial pathogens isolated demonstrated a marked pattern of antibiotic resistance. Gram-positive cocci were sensitive to vancomycin with a sensitivity of 93.3%, and gram-negative bacilli were sensitive to amikacin and ceftazidine with a sensitivity of 51.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The effective treatment of catheter-related sepsis is removal of infected catheters. Vancomycin and (or) amikacin may be first chosen to treat CRS.
Address Department of Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Medical University, Shanghai 200032
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Chinese Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0529-5815 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:11829916 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 100520
Permanent link to this record