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Author (up) Backman, A.; Sjogren, K.; Lindkvist, M.; Lovheim, H.; Edvardsson, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Towards person-centredness in aged care – exploring the impact of leadership Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Nursing Management Abbreviated Journal J Nurs Manag  
  Volume 24 Issue 6 Pages 766-774  
  Keywords leadership behaviour; management; nursing homes; person-centred care; psychosocial climate  
  Abstract AIM: To explore the association between leadership behaviours among managers in aged care, and person-centredness of care and the psychosocial climate. BACKGROUND: Theory suggests that leadership is important for improving person-centredness in aged care, however, empirical evidence is lacking. METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from Swedish aged care staff (n = 3661). Valid and reliable questionnaires assessing leadership behaviours, person-centeredness of care and the psychosocial climate were used. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression including interaction terms. RESULTS: Leadership behaviours were significantly related to the person-centredness of care and the psychosocial climate. The level of person-centredness of care moderated the impact of leadership on the psychosocial climate. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The leadership behaviour of managers significantly impacts person-centred care practice and contributes to the psychosocial climate for both staff and residents in aged care. This study is the first empirically to confirm that middle managers have a central leadership role in developing and supporting person-centred care practice, thereby creating a positive psychosocial climate and high quality care.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0966-0429 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27046801 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95073  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bago, J.R.; Sheets, K.T.; Hingtgen, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neural stem cell therapy for cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Methods (San Diego, Calif.) Abbreviated Journal Methods  
  Volume 99 Issue Pages 37-43  
  Keywords Animals; Cell Culture Techniques; Cell Engineering; Cell Movement; Cellular Reprogramming; Humans; Neoplasms/*therapy; Neural Stem Cells/physiology/*transplantation; Cancer therapy; Drug delivery; Gene therapy; Glioblastoma; Neural stem cell  
  Abstract Cancers of the brain remain one of the greatest medical challenges. Traditional surgery and chemo-radiation therapy are unable to eradicate diffuse cancer cells and tumor recurrence is nearly inevitable. In contrast to traditional regenerative medicine applications, engineered neural stem cells (NSCs) are emerging as a promising new therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. The tumor-homing properties allow NSCs to access both primary and invasive tumor foci, creating a novel delivery platform. NSCs engineered with a wide array of cytotoxic agents have been found to significantly reduce tumor volumes and markedly extend survival in preclinical models. With the recent launch of new clinical trials, the potential to successfully manage cancer in human patients with cytotoxic NSC therapy is moving closer to becoming a reality.  
  Address Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Biomedical Research Imaging Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: hingtgen@email.unc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1046-2023 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26314280 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96689  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baidoobonso, S.; Bauer, G.R.; Speechley, K.N.; Lawson, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social and Proximate Determinants of the Frequency of Condom Use Among African, Caribbean, and Other Black People in a Canadian City: Results from the BLACCH Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health Abbreviated Journal J Immigr Minor Health  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 67-85  
  Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group/*statistics & numerical data; Canada/epidemiology; Caribbean Region/ethnology; Community-Based Participatory Research; Condoms/*utilization; Ethnic Groups/*statistics & numerical data; Female; HIV Infections/ethnology/prevention & control; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Middle Aged; Risk-Taking; Sex Factors; Sexual Behavior/ethnology; Social Determinants of Health; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult; African descent; Black people; Hiv/Aids; Sexually transmitted infections; Social determinants of health  
  Abstract African, Caribbean, and other Black (ACB) people are a priority group for HIV prevention in Canada, but little is known about condom use in this population. This exploratory community-based research project addresses this gap in knowledge. 125 sexually active ACB people completed a questionnaire covering condom use and social determinants of health. The data were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression and mediation analyses. 20.5 % of sexually active ACB adults used condoms consistently. Male gender, wealth, unstable immigration classes, and unsecure employment statuses were independently associated with more frequent condom use. Proximate determinants mediating these relationships included: not having a cohabiting regular partner, not disliking condoms, and having a history of unwanted sex. The proximate determinants mediated 85.7-97.6 % of the effects of the social determinants. These results link social context and proximate factors with condom use. They can be used to design evidence-informed interventions for ACB people.  
  Address Women's Studies and Feminist Research, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada  
  Corporate Author BLACCH Study Team Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1557-1912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24488693 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97050  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baidoobonso, S.; Bauer, G.R.; Speechley, K.N.; Lawson, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social and Proximate Determinants of the Frequency of Condom Use Among African, Caribbean, and Other Black People in a Canadian City: Results from the BLACCH Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health Abbreviated Journal J Immigr Minor Health  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 67-85  
  Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group/*statistics & numerical data; Canada/epidemiology; Caribbean Region/ethnology; Community-Based Participatory Research; Condoms/*utilization; Ethnic Groups/*statistics & numerical data; Female; HIV Infections/ethnology/prevention & control; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Middle Aged; Risk-Taking; Sex Factors; Sexual Behavior/ethnology; Social Determinants of Health; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult; African descent; Black people; Hiv/Aids; Sexually transmitted infections; Social determinants of health  
  Abstract African, Caribbean, and other Black (ACB) people are a priority group for HIV prevention in Canada, but little is known about condom use in this population. This exploratory community-based research project addresses this gap in knowledge. 125 sexually active ACB people completed a questionnaire covering condom use and social determinants of health. The data were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression and mediation analyses. 20.5 % of sexually active ACB adults used condoms consistently. Male gender, wealth, unstable immigration classes, and unsecure employment statuses were independently associated with more frequent condom use. Proximate determinants mediating these relationships included: not having a cohabiting regular partner, not disliking condoms, and having a history of unwanted sex. The proximate determinants mediated 85.7-97.6 % of the effects of the social determinants. These results link social context and proximate factors with condom use. They can be used to design evidence-informed interventions for ACB people.  
  Address Women's Studies and Feminist Research, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada  
  Corporate Author BLACCH Study Team Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1557-1912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24488693 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97090  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baidoobonso, S.; Bauer, G.R.; Speechley, K.N.; Lawson, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social and Proximate Determinants of the Frequency of Condom Use Among African, Caribbean, and Other Black People in a Canadian City: Results from the BLACCH Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health Abbreviated Journal J Immigr Minor Health  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 67-85  
  Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group/*statistics & numerical data; Canada/epidemiology; Caribbean Region/ethnology; Community-Based Participatory Research; Condoms/*utilization; Ethnic Groups/*statistics & numerical data; Female; HIV Infections/ethnology/prevention & control; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Middle Aged; Risk-Taking; Sex Factors; Sexual Behavior/ethnology; Social Determinants of Health; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult; African descent; Black people; Hiv/Aids; Sexually transmitted infections; Social determinants of health  
  Abstract African, Caribbean, and other Black (ACB) people are a priority group for HIV prevention in Canada, but little is known about condom use in this population. This exploratory community-based research project addresses this gap in knowledge. 125 sexually active ACB people completed a questionnaire covering condom use and social determinants of health. The data were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression and mediation analyses. 20.5 % of sexually active ACB adults used condoms consistently. Male gender, wealth, unstable immigration classes, and unsecure employment statuses were independently associated with more frequent condom use. Proximate determinants mediating these relationships included: not having a cohabiting regular partner, not disliking condoms, and having a history of unwanted sex. The proximate determinants mediated 85.7-97.6 % of the effects of the social determinants. These results link social context and proximate factors with condom use. They can be used to design evidence-informed interventions for ACB people.  
  Address Women's Studies and Feminist Research, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada  
  Corporate Author BLACCH Study Team Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1557-1912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24488693 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97130  
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