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Author Goncalves, P.B.; Hallal, P.C.; Hino, A.A.F.; Reis, R.S.
Title Individual and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adults from Curitiba, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Public Health
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Accelerometry; Adults; Environmental correlates; Individual correlates; Physical activity; Sedentary time
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association of individual and neighborhood environment characteristics and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in adults from Curitiba, Brazil. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted through face-to-face household interviews in 2010. The analytic sample included 305 adults aged 20-65 years recruited from 32 census tracts selected according to neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status. Individual and environmental PA correlates were evaluated through standardized and valid self-reported measures, including the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Minutes per week of PA and ST were assessed through accelerometry. Multi-level regression models were used in the analyses. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders the strongest individual and environmental correlates associated with ST was residential density (B = 0.14; p = 0.008), light-intensity PA was being a father/mother (B = 35.71; p = 0.025) and moderate-to-vigorous PA was sex (B = 0.91; p < 0.001) and number of cars (one car, B = -1.05; two cars, B = -1.14; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The associations found with individual and environmental correlates varied accordingly across all outcomes. Future changes in policies and infrastructure should consider the social context of the community and improvements to promote a safer environment in the neighborhood.
Address Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1661-8556 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28717827 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98014
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Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97187
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Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mercatelli, N.; Galardi, S.; Ciafre, S.A.
Title MicroRNAs as Multifaceted Players in Glioblastoma Multiforme Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal (up) Int Rev Cell Mol Biol
Volume 333 Issue Pages 269-323
Keywords Biomarker; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; MicroRNAs; Microenvironment; OncomomiRs; Therapy; Tumor suppressors
Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and inevitably lethal primary brain tumor, with a median survival rate of only 15 months from diagnosis. The current standard treatment involves maximal surgical resection flanked by radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide. However, even such aggressive treatment is never curative, and recurrent tumors always arise, commonly in more aggressive, chemo- and radio-resistant forms, leading to untreatable and deadly tumors. MicroRNAs, recognized major players in cancer, are deeply involved in GBM, as shown by more than a decade of studies. In this review, we revise the main milestones of MicroRNA studies in GBM, and the latest relevant discoveries in this field. Examples are given of MicroRNAs working as “oncomiRs” or tumor suppressors, with specific connections with GBM clinical subtypes, patients' survival, and resistance to therapies. As the interaction of GBM cells with the microenvironment was proven as a key determinant of tumor growth, the role of MicroRNAs in GBM microenvironment, tumor angiogenesis, and tumor-secreted microvesicles is also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the latest findings presenting MicroRNAs as possible therapeutic targets for GBM, or their use as circulating biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis.
Address Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1937-6448 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28729027 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96577
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Author Kane, S.P.; Hanes, S.D.
Title Unexplained increases in serum vancomycin concentration in a morbidly obese patient Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Intensive & Critical Care Nursing Abbreviated Journal (up) Intensive Crit Care Nurs
Volume 39 Issue Pages 55-58
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Cross Reactions/physiology; Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Middle Aged; Obesity, Morbid/*drug therapy/physiopathology; Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/drug therapy/prevention & control; Vancomycin/*administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Central venous catheters; Critical care; Drug monitoring; Infectious disease; Medication safety; Vancomycin
Abstract INTRODUCTION: To report a case of increases in vancomycin concentrations without additional vancomycin doses being given. CASE STUDY: A 64 year-old morbidly obese female received three total doses of vancomycin for surgical prophylaxis and for ventilator-associated pneumonia. Subsequent vancomycin concentrations from the patient's central venous catheter (CVC) demonstrated increasing drug levels from 27.1 to 45.9mcg/mL despite no additional vancomycin being given and proper line flushing prior to sample collection. There is no clear explanation for the increase in the patient's vancomycin concentration. Drug leaching from the CVC, enterohepatic recycling, drug redistribution from adipose or other tissues, and assay cross-reactivity with other medications are all potential explanations for the increased vancomycin concentrations. CONCLUSION: This case report describes an unexplained increase in vancomycin concentrations and reinforces both the fallibility of laboratory testing and that unusual circumstances do occur. Several potential causes are hypothesised with CVC drug leaching being the most likely. Nurses and other healthcare providers with similar scenarios should consider a peripheral blood sample to rule out the potential for CVC drug leaching as a possible explanation.
Address Department of Pharmacy Practice, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: scott.hanes@rosalindfranklin.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0964-3397 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27899248 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98971
Permanent link to this record