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Author Fuster, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “We like Fried Things”: Negotiating Health and Taste among Hispanic Caribbean Communities in New York City Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecology of Food and Nutrition Abbreviated Journal (up) Ecol Food Nutr  
  Volume 56 Issue 2 Pages 124-138  
  Keywords Adult; *Cooking; Cuba; Dominican Republic; Female; *Food Analysis; *Food Preferences; Hispanic Americans; Humans; Male; New York City; Puerto Rico; Taste; Young Adult; Emigration and immigration; Hispanic Americans; New York City; qualitative research  
  Abstract The study was conducted to understand fried-food (FF) consumption among Hispanic Caribbean (HC) communities in New York City. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 23 adults self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, or Puerto Rican. Most informants considered FFs an important part of their traditional diet. Potential explanations included taste, cost, convenience, and the emotive values attached to FF. FF consumption was contextualized in local foodscapes. Results include strategies to diminish FF consumption and differences across HC groups and migratory generations. The relevance for future nutrition interventions addressing health disparities in this community is discussed.  
  Address a Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences , City University of New York-Brooklyn College , Brooklyn , New York , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0367-0244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28059558 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98032  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Griboff, J.; Horacek, M.; Wunderlin, D.A.; Monferran, M.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of metals, As and Se through a freshwater food web affected by antrophic pollution in Cordoba, Argentina Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Abbreviated Journal (up) Ecotoxicol Environ Saf  
  Volume 148 Issue Pages 275-284  
  Keywords Aquatic organisms; As; Biomagnification; Food web; Metals; Stable isotopes  
  Abstract The concentration of metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, U), As and Se in different ecosystem components (water, sediment, plankton, shrimp, and fish muscle) has been determined in a eutrophic reservoir in the Province of Cordoba (Argentina). Los Molinos Lake (LML) was sampled during the dry (DS) and wet seasons (WS) in order to examine the bioaccumulation and transfer of these inorganic elements through the food web. Stable nitrogen isotope (delta15N) was used to investigate trophic interactions. According to this, samples were divided into three categories: plankton, shrimp (Palaemonetes argentinus) and fish (Silverside, Odontesthes bonariensis). The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) was calculated for the organisms, and it was determined that the elements analyzed undergo bioaccumulation, especially in organisms such as plankton. The invertebrates were characterized by the highest BAF for Cu and Zn in both seasons, As (DS), and Cd and Hg (WS). The fish muscle was characterized by the highest BAF for Se (WS), Ag and Hg (DS). On the other hand, a significant decrease in Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and U concentrations through the analyzed trophic web during both seasons was observed. Moreover, a significant increase in Hg levels was observed with increasing trophic levels in the DS, indicating its biomagnification. Despite the increasing impact of metals, As and Se pollution in the studied area due to urban growth and agricultural and livestock activities, no previous study has focused on the behavior and relationships of these pollutants with the biotic and abiotic components of this aquatic reservoir. We expect that these findings may be used for providing directions or guidance for future monitoring and environmental protection policies.  
  Address ICYTAC, Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos Cordoba, CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Bv. Dr. Juan Filloy s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba, Argentina. Electronic address: mmonferran@fcq.unc.edu.ar  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0147-6513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29078130 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98006  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Radbel, J.; Boutsikaris, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The New Usual Care Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America Abbreviated Journal (up) Emerg Med Clin North Am  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 11-23  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheterization, Central Venous; Clinical Protocols/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Fluid Therapy; Humans; Sepsis/diagnosis/*therapy; ARISE trial; Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT); ProCESS trial; ProMISe trial; Sepsis; Usual care  
  Abstract Recent literature continues to refine which components of the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) algorithm are necessary. Given it utilizes central venous pressure, continuous central venous oxygen saturation, routine blood transfusions, and inotropic medications, this algorithm can be timely, invasive, costly, and potentially harmful. New trials highlight early recognition, early fluid resuscitation, appropriate antibiotic treatment, source control, and the application of a multidisciplinary evidence-based approach as essential components of current sepsis management. This article discusses the landmark sepsis trials that have been published over the past several decades and offers recommendations on what should currently be considered 'usual care'.  
  Address Department of Emergency Medicine, Saint Peters University Hospital, 254 Easton Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. Electronic address: boutsida@rwjms.rutgers.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-8627 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27908328 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99263  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Radbel, J.; Boutsikaris, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The New Usual Care Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America Abbreviated Journal (up) Emerg Med Clin North Am  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 11-23  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheterization, Central Venous; Clinical Protocols/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Fluid Therapy; Humans; Sepsis/diagnosis/*therapy; ARISE trial; Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT); ProCESS trial; ProMISe trial; Sepsis; Usual care  
  Abstract Recent literature continues to refine which components of the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) algorithm are necessary. Given it utilizes central venous pressure, continuous central venous oxygen saturation, routine blood transfusions, and inotropic medications, this algorithm can be timely, invasive, costly, and potentially harmful. New trials highlight early recognition, early fluid resuscitation, appropriate antibiotic treatment, source control, and the application of a multidisciplinary evidence-based approach as essential components of current sepsis management. This article discusses the landmark sepsis trials that have been published over the past several decades and offers recommendations on what should currently be considered 'usual care'.  
  Address Department of Emergency Medicine, Saint Peters University Hospital, 254 Easton Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. Electronic address: boutsida@rwjms.rutgers.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-8627 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27908328 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100293  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villalobos, A.M.; Barraza, F.; Jorquera, H.; Schauer, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wood burning pollution in southern Chile: PM2.5 source apportionment using CMB and molecular markers Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal (up) Environ Pollut  
  Volume 225 Issue Pages 514-523  
  Keywords Aerosols/analysis; Air Pollutants/*analysis; Chile; Cities; Coal; Dust; *Environmental Monitoring; Fires; Heating; Nitrates/analysis; Particulate Matter/*analysis; Seasons; Smoke; Sulfates/analysis; Wood/chemistry; Cmb-Mm; Fuel poverty; Source apportionment; Southern Chile; Sustainable urban development; Wood burning  
  Abstract Temuco is a mid-size city representative of severe wood smoke pollution in southern Chile; i.e., ambient 24-h PM2.5 concentrations have exceeded 150 mug/m3 in the winter season and the top concentration reached 372 mug/m3 in 2010. Annual mean concentrations have decreased but are still above 30 mug/m3. For the very first time, a molecular marker source apportionment of ambient organic carbon (OC) and PM2.5 was conducted in Temuco. Primary resolved sources for PM2.5 were wood smoke (37.5%), coal combustion (4.4%), diesel vehicles (3.3%), dust (2.2%) and vegetative detritus (0.7%). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 (sulfates, nitrates and ammonium) contributed 4.8% and unresolved organic aerosols (generated from volatile emissions from incomplete wood combustion), including secondary organic aerosols, contributed 47.1%. Adding the contributions of unresolved organic aerosols to those from primary wood smoke implies that wood burning is responsible for 84.6% of the ambient PM2.5 in Temuco. This predominance of wood smoke is ultimately due to widespread poverty and a lack of efficient household heating methods. The government has been implementing emission abatement policies but achieving compliance with ambient air quality standards for PM2.5 in southern Chile remains a challenge.  
  Address Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28318790 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97509  
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