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Author Lee, J.W.; Lim, D.H.; Sung, K.W.; Lee, H.J.; Yi, E.S.; Yoo, K.H.; Koo, H.H.; Suh, Y.L.; Shin, H.J.
Title Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for High-Grade Gliomas in Children and Adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 195-203
Keywords Adolescent; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*therapeutic use; Brain Neoplasms/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Carboplatin/administration & dosage; Child; Child, Preschool; Etoposide/administration & dosage; Female; Glioma/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Humans; Male; Neoplasm Grading; Remission Induction; Retrospective Studies; Stem Cell Transplantation; Survival Rate; Thiotepa/administration & dosage; Transplantation, Autologous; Treatment Outcome; *Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation; *Brain Tumor; *Children; *High-dose Chemotherapy; *High-grade Glioma
Abstract (down) With the aim to investigate the outcome of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) for high-grade gliomas (HGGs), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with HGGs (16 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 7 other HGGs) between 2006 and 2015. Gross or near total resection was possible in 11 patients. Front-line treatment after surgery was radiotherapy (RT) in 14 patients and chemotherapy in the remaining 16 patients including 3 patients less than 3 years of age. Eight of 12 patients who remained progression free and 5 of the remaining 18 patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent the first HDCT/auto-SCT with carboplatin + thiotepa + etoposide (CTE) regimen and 11 of them proceeded to the second HDCT/auto-SCT with cyclophosphamide + melphalan (CyM) regimen. One patient died from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) during the second HDCT/auto-SCT; otherwise, toxicities were manageable. Four patients in complete response (CR) and 3 of 7 patients in partial response (PR) or second PR at the first HDCT/auto-SCT remained event free: however, 2 patients with progressive tumor experienced progression again. The probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) after the first HDCT/auto-SCT in 11 patients in CR, PR, or second PR was 58.2% +/- 16.9%. Tumor status at the first HDCT/auto-SCT was the only significant factor for outcome after HDCT/auto-SCT. There was no difference in survival between glioblastoma and other HGGs. This study suggests that the outcome of HGGs in children and adolescents after HDCT/auto-SCT is encouraging if the patient could achieve CR or PR before HDCT/auto-SCT.
Address Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. shinhj@skku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28049229 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96614
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Author Castillo, M.E.; Molina, J.R.; Rodriguez Y Silva, F.; Garcia-Chevesich, P.; Garfias, R.
Title A system to evaluate fire impacts from simulated fire behavior in Mediterranean areas of Central Chile Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 579 Issue Pages 1410-1418
Keywords Wildfire behavior; Wildfire intensity; Wildfire simulation
Abstract (down) Wildfires constitute the greatest economic disruption to Mediterranean ecosystems, from a socio-economic and ecological perspective (Molina et al., 2014). This study proposes to classify fire intensity levels based on potential fire behavior in different types of Mediterranean vegetation types, using two geographical scales. The study considered >4 thousand wildfires over a period of 25years, identifying fire behavior on each event, based on simulations using “KITRAL”, a model developed in Chile in 1993 and currently used in the entire country. Fire intensity values allowed results to be classified into six fire effects categories (levels), each of them with field indicators linking energy values with damage related to burned vegetation and wildland urban interface zone. These indicators also facilitated a preliminary assessment of wildfire impact on different Mediterranean land uses and, are therefore, a useful tool to prioritize future interventions.
Address International Hydrology Research Group, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Nature Conservancy, University of Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27923572 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97511
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Author Yu, W.-L.; Lee, M.-F.; Chen, C.-C.; Tang, H.-J.; Ho, C.-H.; Chuang, Y.-C.
Title Impacts of Hypervirulence Determinants on Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Microb Drug Resist
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 376-383
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology; Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Cross Infection/drug therapy/microbiology; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*genetics; Male; Middle Aged; Serogroup; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Virulence Factors/*genetics; beta-Lactamases/*genetics; Esbl; Klebsiella pneumoniae; hypermucoviscosity; hypervirulence; rmpA; virulence
Abstract (down) We investigated the implications of hypervirulence determinants on clinical features of 48 adult patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates in the hypervirulence group included any of the following virulence determinants: K1/K2 capsule serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, rmpA gene, or rmpA2 gene. Nonhypervirulence group isolates were negative for all of the above virulence factors. In this study, all isolates used were non-K1/K2 strains. Statistically significant differences were observed in clinical features of patients between the two groups. The hypervirulent isolates (n = 19), including 11 isolates with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, 15 with the rmpA gene, and 16 with the rmpA2 gene, were more commonly recovered from diabetic patients and mainly manifested as secondary bacteremia (such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, or other localized infections). The nonhypervirulent isolates (n = 29) were more commonly recovered from patients after prolonged hospital stays (>30 days) and mostly manifested as primary bacteremia. The overall in-hospital mortality was 56.3%. Hazard ratio (HR) analysis revealed the following positive predictors for mortality: nosocomial infection, stay in an intensive care unit, no removal of the central venous catheter, Charlson comorbidity score, and APACHE II score (>==15). The negative predictors were initial appropriate antibiotic therapy (HR 0.42) and urinary tract infection (HR 0.19). Charlson score was an independent confounder based on multivariate analysis (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.99). In conclusion, hypervirulence determinants played a role in causing secondary infections in diabetic patients; however, the presence of morbidity cofactors could themselves influence mortality, despite the absence of hypervirulence determinants.
Address 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center-Liou Ying , Tainan City, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1076-6294 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27380450 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99505
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Author Yu, W.-L.; Lee, M.-F.; Chen, C.-C.; Tang, H.-J.; Ho, C.-H.; Chuang, Y.-C.
Title Impacts of Hypervirulence Determinants on Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Microb Drug Resist
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 376-383
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology; Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Cross Infection/drug therapy/microbiology; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*genetics; Male; Middle Aged; Serogroup; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Virulence Factors/*genetics; beta-Lactamases/*genetics; Esbl; Klebsiella pneumoniae; hypermucoviscosity; hypervirulence; rmpA; virulence
Abstract (down) We investigated the implications of hypervirulence determinants on clinical features of 48 adult patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates in the hypervirulence group included any of the following virulence determinants: K1/K2 capsule serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, rmpA gene, or rmpA2 gene. Nonhypervirulence group isolates were negative for all of the above virulence factors. In this study, all isolates used were non-K1/K2 strains. Statistically significant differences were observed in clinical features of patients between the two groups. The hypervirulent isolates (n = 19), including 11 isolates with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, 15 with the rmpA gene, and 16 with the rmpA2 gene, were more commonly recovered from diabetic patients and mainly manifested as secondary bacteremia (such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, or other localized infections). The nonhypervirulent isolates (n = 29) were more commonly recovered from patients after prolonged hospital stays (>30 days) and mostly manifested as primary bacteremia. The overall in-hospital mortality was 56.3%. Hazard ratio (HR) analysis revealed the following positive predictors for mortality: nosocomial infection, stay in an intensive care unit, no removal of the central venous catheter, Charlson comorbidity score, and APACHE II score (>==15). The negative predictors were initial appropriate antibiotic therapy (HR 0.42) and urinary tract infection (HR 0.19). Charlson score was an independent confounder based on multivariate analysis (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.99). In conclusion, hypervirulence determinants played a role in causing secondary infections in diabetic patients; however, the presence of morbidity cofactors could themselves influence mortality, despite the absence of hypervirulence determinants.
Address 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center-Liou Ying , Tainan City, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1076-6294 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27380450 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100535
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Voss, D.M.; Spina, R.; Carter, D.L.; Lim, K.S.; Jeffery, C.J.; Bar, E.E.
Title Disruption of the monocarboxylate transporter-4-basigin interaction inhibits the hypoxic response, proliferation, and tumor progression Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4292
Keywords
Abstract (down) We have previously shown that glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are enriched in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, and that monocarboxylate transporter-4 (MCT4) is critical for mediating GSC signaling in hypoxia. Basigin is involved in many physiological functions during early stages of development and in cancer and is required for functional plasma membrane expression of MCT4. We sought to determine if disruption of the MCT-Basigin interaction may be achieved with a small molecule. Using a cell-based drug-screening assay, we identified Acriflavine (ACF), a small molecule that inhibits the binding between Basigin and MCT4. Surface plasmon resonance and cellular thermal-shift-assays confirmed ACF binding to basigin in vitro and in live glioblastoma cells, respectively. ACF significantly inhibited growth and self-renewal potential of several glioblastoma neurosphere lines in vitro, and this activity was further augmented by hypoxia. Finally, treatment of mice bearing GSC-derived xenografts resulted in significant inhibition of tumor progression in early and late-stage disease. ACF treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of VEGF and tumor vascularization. Our work serves as a proof-of-concept as it shows, for the first time, that disruption of MCT binding to their chaperon, Basigin, may be an effective approach to target GSC and to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression.
Address Department of Neurological Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH, USA. eli.bar@case.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28655889 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96580
Permanent link to this record