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Author McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90  
  Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.  
  Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97446  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90  
  Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.  
  Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97634  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90  
  Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.  
  Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Celiku, O.; Tandle, A.; Chung, J.-Y.; Hewitt, S.M.; Camphausen, K.; Shankavaram, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Computational analysis of the mesenchymal signature landscape in gliomas Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Medical Genomics Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Genomics  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 13  
  Keywords Cd44; Computational modeling; Epithelial to mesenchymal transition; Glioma  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and mimicking processes, contribute to cancer invasion and metastasis, and are known to be responsible for resistance to various therapeutic agents in many cancers. While a number of studies have proposed molecular signatures that characterize the spectrum of such transition, more work is needed to understand how the mesenchymal signature (MS) is regulated in non-epithelial cancers like gliomas, to identify markers with the most prognostic significance, and potential for therapeutic targeting. RESULTS: Computational analysis of 275 glioma samples from “The Cancer Genome Atlas” was used to identify the regulatory changes between low grade gliomas with little expression of MS, and high grade glioblastomas with high expression of MS. TF (transcription factor)-gene regulatory networks were constructed for each of the cohorts, and 5 major pathways and 118 transcription factors were identified as involved in the differential regulation of the networks. The most significant pathway – Extracellular matrix organization – was further analyzed for prognostic relevance. A 20-gene signature was identified as having prognostic significance (HR (hazard ratio) 3.2, 95% CI (confidence interval) = 1.53-8.33), after controlling for known prognostic factors (age, and glioma grade). The signature's significance was validated in an independent data set. The putative stem cell marker CD44 was biologically validated in glioma cell lines and brain tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the differences between low grade gliomas and high grade glioblastoma are associated with differential expression of the signature genes, raising the possibility that targeting these genes might prolong survival in glioma patients.  
  Address Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 10 Center Drive, Bldg. 10, Rm. B3B70, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. uma@mail.nih.gov  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-8794 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28279210 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96602  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Derose, K.P.; Payan, D.D.; Fulcar, M.A.; Terrero, S.; Acevedo, R.; Farias, H.; Palar, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181568  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Domestic Violence; Dominican Republic/epidemiology; Female; *Food Supply; HIV/isolation & purification; HIV Infections/*epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Qualitative Research; Social Stigma; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. METHODS: We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. RESULTS: Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the rights of people living with HIV, reduce HIV-related stigma, and improve gender equality.  
  Address Division of HIV, ID and Global Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28742870 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97262  
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