|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract (up) Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97187
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract (up) Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author D'Alessandris, Q.G.; Biffoni, M.; Martini, M.; Runci, D.; Buccarelli, M.; Cenci, T.; Signore, M.; Stancato, L.; Olivi, A.; De Maria, R.; Larocca, L.M.; Ricci-Vitiani, L.; Pallini, R.
Title The clinical value of patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres in predicting treatment response Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol
Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 1097-1108
Keywords cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; radiotherapy; temozolomide; treatment outcome
Abstract (up) Background: Advances from glioma stemlike cell (GSC) research, though increasing our knowledge of glioblastoma (GBM) biology, do not influence clinical decisions yet. We explored the translational power of GSC-enriched cultures from patient-derived tumorspheres (TS) in predicting treatment response. Methods: The relationship between TS growth and clinical outcome was investigated in 52 GBMs treated with surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). The effect on TS of radiation (6 to 60 Gy) and of TMZ (3.9 muM to 1 mM) was related with patients' survival. Results: Generation of TS was an independent factor for poor overall survival (OS) and poor progression-free survival (PFS) (P < .0001 and P = .0010, respectively). Growth rate and clonogenicity of TS predicted poor OS. In general, TS were highly resistant to both radiation and TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was stronger in TS with high clonogenicity and fast growth (P < .02). Shorter PFS was associated with radiation LD50 (lethal dose required to kill 50% of TS cells) >12 Gy of matched TS (P = .0484). A direct relationship was found between sensitivity of TS to TMZ and patients' survival (P = .0167 and P = .0436 for OS and PFS, respectively). Importantly, values for TMZ half-maximal inhibitory concentration <50 muM, which are in the range of plasma levels achieved in vivo, identified cases with longer OS and PFS (P = .0020 and P = .0016, respectively). Conclusions: Analysis of TS holds translational relevance by predicting the response of parent tumors to radiation and, particularly, to TMZ. Dissecting the clonogenic population from proliferating progeny in TS can guide therapeutic strategies to a more effective drug selection and treatment duration.
Address Institute of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy; Institute of Pathology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28204560 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96607
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Souza, R.L.; Mugabe, V.A.; Paploski, I.A.D.; Rodrigues, M.S.; Moreira, P.S.D.S.; Nascimento, L.C.J.; Roundy, C.M.; Weaver, S.C.; Reis, M.G.; Kitron, U.; Ribeiro, G.S.
Title Effect of an intervention in storm drains to prevent Aedes aegypti reproduction in Salvador, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Parasites & Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 328
Keywords Aedes aegypti; Arboviruses; Catch basin; Disease vectors; Entomology; Epidemiology; Insect vectors; Mosquitoes; Storm drain
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Aedes aegypti, the principal vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses, is a synanthropic species that uses stagnant water to complete its reproductive cycle. In urban settings, rainfall water draining structures, such as storm drains, may retain water and serve as a larval development site for Aedes spp. reproduction. Herein, we describe the effect of a community-based intervention on preventing standing water accumulation in storm drains and their consequent infestation by adult and immature Ae. aegypti and other mosquitoes. METHODS: Between April and May of 2016, local residents association of Salvador, Brazil, after being informed of water accumulation and Ae. aegypti infestation in the storm drains in their area, performed an intervention on 52 storm drains. The intervention consisted of placing concrete at the bottom of the storm drains to elevate their base to the level of the outflow tube, avoiding water accumulation, and placement of a metal mesh covering the outflow tube to avoid its clogging with debris. To determine the impact of the intervention, we compared the frequency at which the 52 storm drains contained water, as well as adult and immature mosquitoes using data from two surveys performed before and two surveys performed after the intervention. RESULTS: During the pre-intervention period, water accumulated in 48 (92.3%) of the storm drains, and immature Ae. aegypti were found in 11 (21.2%) and adults in 10 (19.2%). After the intervention, water accumulated in 5 (9.6%) of the storm drains (P < 0.001), none (0.0%) had immatures (P < 0.001), and 3 (5.8%) contained adults (P = 0.039). The total number of Ae. aegypti immatures collected decreased from 109 to 0 (P < 0.001) and adults decreased from 37 to 8 (P = 0.011) after the intervention. Collection of immature and adult non-Aedes mosquitoes (mainly Culex spp.) in the storm drains also decreased after the intervention. CONCLUSION: This study exemplifies how a simple intervention targeting storm drains can result in a major reduction of water retention, and, consequently, impact Ae. aegypti larval populations. Larger and multi-center evaluations are needed to confirm the potential of citywide structural modifications of storm drains to reduce Aedes spp. infestation level.
Address Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. guilherme.ribeiro@bahia.fiocruz.br
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1756-3305 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28697811 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97633
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, A.A.; Abrey, L.E.; Terziev, R.; Raizer, J.; Martinez, N.L.; Forsyth, P.; Paleologos, N.; Matasar, M.; Sauter, C.S.; Moskowitz, C.; Nimer, S.D.; DeAngelis, L.M.; Kaley, T.; Grimm, S.; Louis, D.N.; Cairncross, J.G.; Panageas, K.S.; Briggs, S.; Faivre, G.; Mohile, N.A.; Mehta, J.; Jonsson, P.; Chakravarty, D.; Gao, J.; Schultz, N.; Brennan, C.W.; Huse, J.T.; Omuro, A.
Title Multicenter phase II study of temozolomide and myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant for newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol
Volume 19 Issue 10 Pages 1380-1390
Keywords 1p/19q codeletion; anaplastic oligodendroglioma; autologous stem cell transplant; temozolomide
Abstract (up) Background: Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) are chemotherapy-sensitive tumors with prolonged survival after radiochemotherapy. We report a prospective trial using induction temozolomide (TMZ) followed by myeloablative high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT) as a potential strategy to defer radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with AO/AOA received 6 cycles of TMZ (200 mg/m2 x 5/28 day). Responding patients were eligible for HDC (thiotepa 250 mg/m2/day x 3 days, then busulfan 3.2 mg/kg/day x 3 days), followed by ASCT. Genomic characterization was performed using next-generation sequencing. Results: Forty-one patients were enrolled; 85% had 1p/19q codeleted tumors. After induction, 26 patients were eligible for HDC-ASCT and 21 agreed to proceed. There were no unexpected adverse events or toxic deaths. After median follow-up of 66 months, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) for transplanted patients was 86%, 5-year PFS 60%, and no patient has died. Among all 1p/19q codeleted patients (N = 33), 5-year PFS was 50% and 5-year overall survival (OS) 93%, with median time to radiotherapy not reached. Next-generation sequencing disclosed typical oligodendroglioma-related mutations, including IDH1, TERT, CIC, and FUBP1 mutations in 1p/19q codeleted patients, and glioblastoma-like signatures in 1p/19q intact patients. Aside from IDH1, potentially oncogenic/actionable mutations were variable, depicting wide molecular heterogeneity within oligodendroglial tumors. Conclusions: TMZ followed by HDC-ASCT can be safely administered to patients with newly diagnosed 1p/19q codeleted AO. This strategy was associated with promising PFS and OS, suggesting that a chemotherapy-based approach may delay the need for radiotherapy and radiation-related toxicities. Raw data for further genomic and meta-analyses are publicly available at http://cbioportal.org/study?id=odgmsk2017, accessed 6 January 2017. Clinicaltrials.gov registry: NCT00588523.
Address Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York,USA; Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA; NorthShore University, Evanston, Illinois,USA; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28472509 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96586
Permanent link to this record