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Author Herrero, M.; Thornton, P.K.; Power, B.; Bogard, J.R.; Remans, R.; Fritz, S.; Gerber, J.S.; Nelson, G.; See, L.; Waha, K.; Watson, R.A.; West, P.C.; Samberg, L.H.; van de Steeg, J.; Stephenson, E.; van Wijk, M.; Havlik, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Planetary Health Abbreviated Journal Lancet Planet Health  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages e33-e42  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Information about the global structure of agriculture and nutrient production and its diversity is essential to improve present understanding of national food production patterns, agricultural livelihoods, and food chains, and their linkages to land use and their associated ecosystems services. Here we provide a plausible breakdown of global agricultural and nutrient production by farm size, and also study the associations between farm size, agricultural diversity, and nutrient production. This analysis is crucial to design interventions that might be appropriately targeted to promote healthy diets and ecosystems in the face of population growth, urbanisation, and climate change. METHODS: We used existing spatially-explicit global datasets to estimate the production levels of 41 major crops, seven livestock, and 14 aquaculture and fish products. From overall production estimates, we estimated the production of vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, iron, zinc, calcium, calories, and protein. We also estimated the relative contribution of farms of different sizes to the production of different agricultural commodities and associated nutrients, as well as how the diversity of food production based on the number of different products grown per geographic pixel and distribution of products within this pixel (Shannon diversity index [H]) changes with different farm sizes. FINDINGS: Globally, small and medium farms (</=50 ha) produce 51-77% of nearly all commodities and nutrients examined here. However, important regional differences exist. Large farms (>50 ha) dominate production in North America, South America, and Australia and New Zealand. In these regions, large farms contribute between 75% and 100% of all cereal, livestock, and fruit production, and the pattern is similar for other commodity groups. By contrast, small farms (</=20 ha) produce more than 75% of most food commodities in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, south Asia, and China. In Europe, west Asia and north Africa, and central America, medium-size farms (20-50 ha) also contribute substantially to the production of most food commodities. Very small farms (</=2 ha) are important and have local significance in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia, where they contribute to about 30% of most food commodities. The majority of vegetables (81%), roots and tubers (72%), pulses (67%), fruits (66%), fish and livestock products (60%), and cereals (56%) are produced in diverse landscapes (H>1.5). Similarly, the majority of global micronutrients (53-81%) and protein (57%) are also produced in more diverse agricultural landscapes (H>1.5). By contrast, the majority of sugar (73%) and oil crops (57%) are produced in less diverse ones (H</=1.5), which also account for the majority of global calorie production (56%). The diversity of agricultural and nutrient production diminishes as farm size increases. However, areas of the world with higher agricultural diversity produce more nutrients, irrespective of farm size. INTERPRETATION: Our results show that farm size and diversity of agricultural production vary substantially across regions and are key structural determinants of food and nutrient production that need to be considered in plans to meet social, economic, and environmental targets. At the global level, both small and large farms have key roles in food and nutrition security. Efforts to maintain production diversity as farm sizes increase seem to be necessary to maintain the production of diverse nutrients and viable, multifunctional, sustainable landscapes. FUNDING: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health funded by the CGIAR Fund Council, Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation, European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change-Belmont Forum.  
  Address International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2542-5196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28670647 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Herrero, M.; Thornton, P.K.; Power, B.; Bogard, J.R.; Remans, R.; Fritz, S.; Gerber, J.S.; Nelson, G.; See, L.; Waha, K.; Watson, R.A.; West, P.C.; Samberg, L.H.; van de Steeg, J.; Stephenson, E.; van Wijk, M.; Havlik, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Planetary Health Abbreviated Journal Lancet Planet Health  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages e33-e42  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Information about the global structure of agriculture and nutrient production and its diversity is essential to improve present understanding of national food production patterns, agricultural livelihoods, and food chains, and their linkages to land use and their associated ecosystems services. Here we provide a plausible breakdown of global agricultural and nutrient production by farm size, and also study the associations between farm size, agricultural diversity, and nutrient production. This analysis is crucial to design interventions that might be appropriately targeted to promote healthy diets and ecosystems in the face of population growth, urbanisation, and climate change. METHODS: We used existing spatially-explicit global datasets to estimate the production levels of 41 major crops, seven livestock, and 14 aquaculture and fish products. From overall production estimates, we estimated the production of vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, iron, zinc, calcium, calories, and protein. We also estimated the relative contribution of farms of different sizes to the production of different agricultural commodities and associated nutrients, as well as how the diversity of food production based on the number of different products grown per geographic pixel and distribution of products within this pixel (Shannon diversity index [H]) changes with different farm sizes. FINDINGS: Globally, small and medium farms (</=50 ha) produce 51-77% of nearly all commodities and nutrients examined here. However, important regional differences exist. Large farms (>50 ha) dominate production in North America, South America, and Australia and New Zealand. In these regions, large farms contribute between 75% and 100% of all cereal, livestock, and fruit production, and the pattern is similar for other commodity groups. By contrast, small farms (</=20 ha) produce more than 75% of most food commodities in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, south Asia, and China. In Europe, west Asia and north Africa, and central America, medium-size farms (20-50 ha) also contribute substantially to the production of most food commodities. Very small farms (</=2 ha) are important and have local significance in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia, where they contribute to about 30% of most food commodities. The majority of vegetables (81%), roots and tubers (72%), pulses (67%), fruits (66%), fish and livestock products (60%), and cereals (56%) are produced in diverse landscapes (H>1.5). Similarly, the majority of global micronutrients (53-81%) and protein (57%) are also produced in more diverse agricultural landscapes (H>1.5). By contrast, the majority of sugar (73%) and oil crops (57%) are produced in less diverse ones (H</=1.5), which also account for the majority of global calorie production (56%). The diversity of agricultural and nutrient production diminishes as farm size increases. However, areas of the world with higher agricultural diversity produce more nutrients, irrespective of farm size. INTERPRETATION: Our results show that farm size and diversity of agricultural production vary substantially across regions and are key structural determinants of food and nutrient production that need to be considered in plans to meet social, economic, and environmental targets. At the global level, both small and large farms have key roles in food and nutrition security. Efforts to maintain production diversity as farm sizes increase seem to be necessary to maintain the production of diverse nutrients and viable, multifunctional, sustainable landscapes. FUNDING: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health funded by the CGIAR Fund Council, Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation, European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change-Belmont Forum.  
  Address International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2542-5196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28670647 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98017  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moimaz, S.A.S.; Rocha, N.B.; Garbin, C.A.S.; Rovida, T.A.; Saliba, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors affecting intention to breastfeed of a group of Brazilian childbearing women Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives Abbreviated Journal Women Birth  
  Volume 30 Issue 2 Pages e119-e124  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Brazil; Breast Feeding/*psychology; Female; Humans; Mothers/*psychology; Pregnancy; Retrospective Studies; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult; Brazil; Breastfeeding; Breastfeeding difficulties; Breastfeeding initiation; Pregnancy  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Knowing the intention of mothers is important to plan actions to improve exclusive breastfeeding rates. AIM: The objective of this retrospective study was to verify the intention to breastfeed and the intended breastfeeding duration of a group of women participating in a public prenatal dental care program in the city of Aracatuba, Brazil. METHODS: The records of 933 childbearing women were analyzed and their intention to breastfeed and intended breastfeeding duration were associated to women's age, ethnicity, marital status, education, employment, number of gestations, previous breastfeeding experience, previous breastfeeding guidance, presence of complications during pregnancy, and systemic diseases. Data were inserted into Epi Info 2000 and analyzed with Biostat, at a 5% level of significance, and confidence interval of 95%. FINDINGS: Participants mean age was 26.1+/-5.9years. The majority of women (96.5%) declared their intention to breastfeed their babies. The main variables to affect the intention to breastfeed were the number of gestations (p=0.001), previous breastfeeding experience (p=0.03), and previous breastfeeding guidance (p=0.01). Intended breastfeeding duration was significantly affected by women's age (p=0.04), employment (0.02), the number of gestations (p=0.001), and previous breastfeeding experience (p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Previous positive breastfeeding experience and guidance during prenatal examinations positively affected women's intention to breastfeed; while older, unemployed women in their second or more gestation and previous breastfeeding experience intended to breastfeed their children for longer periods of time.  
  Address Preventive and Social Dentistry Department, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Aracatuba, Brazil. Electronic address: nemre@foa.unesp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1871-5192 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27840072 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97339  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Saleh, H.M.; Tawfik, M.M.; Abouellail, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, randomized study of long-term hemodialysis catheter removal versus guidewire exchange to treat catheter-related bloodstream infection Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Vascular Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Surg  
  Volume 66 Issue 5 Pages 1427-1431.e1  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/blood/diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects/*instrumentation; Catheters, Indwelling/*adverse effects; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; *Device Removal/adverse effects; Disease-Free Survival; Egypt; Equipment Design; Female; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Long-term (tunneled cuffed) hemodialysis catheters are frequently used vascular access in renal failure patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a common complication of long-term hemodialysis catheters, with severe morbidities and high risk of mortality. Management of CRBSI by systemic antibiotics while keeping the catheter in place is not effective. Among the different modalities of CRBSI management are catheter removal (CR) and guidewire exchange (GE) of the catheter. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with two different strategies: GE vs CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. METHODS: This prospective randomized study analyzed the outcomes of all cases of long-term hemodialysis CRBSI during a 5-year period. The catheter infection-free survival time was analyzed in the two groups of patients (GE group, 339 patients; CR group, 339 patients). Three weeks of systemic antibiotic therapy was used according to culture in both groups. The catheter infection-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in catheter infection-free survival time for GE and CR groups (P = .69), which is not affected by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, or type of causative organism. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with GE or CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. However, guidewire catheter exchange saves veins for future access, reduces the cost and number of procedures, and avoids complications of new venipuncture.  
  Address Department of Nephrology, Ain Shams University, El Demerdash Hospital, Cairo, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-5214 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28822660 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Saleh, H.M.; Tawfik, M.M.; Abouellail, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, randomized study of long-term hemodialysis catheter removal versus guidewire exchange to treat catheter-related bloodstream infection Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Vascular Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Surg  
  Volume 66 Issue 5 Pages 1427-1431.e1  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/blood/diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects/*instrumentation; Catheters, Indwelling/*adverse effects; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; *Device Removal/adverse effects; Disease-Free Survival; Egypt; Equipment Design; Female; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Long-term (tunneled cuffed) hemodialysis catheters are frequently used vascular access in renal failure patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a common complication of long-term hemodialysis catheters, with severe morbidities and high risk of mortality. Management of CRBSI by systemic antibiotics while keeping the catheter in place is not effective. Among the different modalities of CRBSI management are catheter removal (CR) and guidewire exchange (GE) of the catheter. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with two different strategies: GE vs CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. METHODS: This prospective randomized study analyzed the outcomes of all cases of long-term hemodialysis CRBSI during a 5-year period. The catheter infection-free survival time was analyzed in the two groups of patients (GE group, 339 patients; CR group, 339 patients). Three weeks of systemic antibiotic therapy was used according to culture in both groups. The catheter infection-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in catheter infection-free survival time for GE and CR groups (P = .69), which is not affected by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, or type of causative organism. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with GE or CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. However, guidewire catheter exchange saves veins for future access, reduces the cost and number of procedures, and avoids complications of new venipuncture.  
  Address Department of Nephrology, Ain Shams University, El Demerdash Hospital, Cairo, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-5214 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28822660 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100347  
Permanent link to this record
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