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Author Goetz, L.G.; Valeggia, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Human Biology : the Official Journal of the Human Biology Council Abbreviated Journal Am J Hum Biol  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. METHODS: We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. RESULTS: The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet.  
  Address (up) Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 05611  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1042-0533 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28101997 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98030  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mercatelli, N.; Galardi, S.; Ciafre, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title MicroRNAs as Multifaceted Players in Glioblastoma Multiforme Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal Int Rev Cell Mol Biol  
  Volume 333 Issue Pages 269-323  
  Keywords Biomarker; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; MicroRNAs; Microenvironment; OncomomiRs; Therapy; Tumor suppressors  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and inevitably lethal primary brain tumor, with a median survival rate of only 15 months from diagnosis. The current standard treatment involves maximal surgical resection flanked by radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide. However, even such aggressive treatment is never curative, and recurrent tumors always arise, commonly in more aggressive, chemo- and radio-resistant forms, leading to untreatable and deadly tumors. MicroRNAs, recognized major players in cancer, are deeply involved in GBM, as shown by more than a decade of studies. In this review, we revise the main milestones of MicroRNA studies in GBM, and the latest relevant discoveries in this field. Examples are given of MicroRNAs working as “oncomiRs” or tumor suppressors, with specific connections with GBM clinical subtypes, patients' survival, and resistance to therapies. As the interaction of GBM cells with the microenvironment was proven as a key determinant of tumor growth, the role of MicroRNAs in GBM microenvironment, tumor angiogenesis, and tumor-secreted microvesicles is also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the latest findings presenting MicroRNAs as possible therapeutic targets for GBM, or their use as circulating biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis.  
  Address (up) Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1937-6448 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28729027 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96577  
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Author Howard, C.M.; Valluri, J.; Alberico, A.; Julien, T.; Mazagri, R.; Marsh, R.; Alastair, H.; Cortese, A.; Griswold, M.; Wang, W.; Denning, K.; Brown, L.; Claudio, P.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Chemopredictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Oncology Abbreviated Journal Transl Oncol  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 241-254  
  Keywords  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) treated with standard-of-care maximal surgical resection and concurrent adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ)/radiotherapy remains very poor (less than 15 months). GBMs have been found to contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. The highly invasive nature of high-grade gliomas and their inherent resistance to therapy lead to very high rates of recurrence. For these reasons, not all patients with similar diagnoses respond to the same chemotherapy, schedule, or dose. Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is not only costly but more importantly burdens the patient with unnecessary toxicity and selects for the development of resistant cancer cell clones. We have developed a drug response assay (ChemoID) that identifies the most effective chemotherapy against CSCs and bulk of tumor cells from of a panel of potential treatments, offering great promise for individualized cancer management. Providing the treating physician with drug response information on a panel of approved drugs will aid in personalized therapy selections of the most effective chemotherapy for individual patients, thereby improving outcomes. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of the ChemoID drug response assay in GBM patients treated with standard of care. METHODS: Forty-one GBM patients (mean age 54 years, 59% male), all eligible for a surgical biopsy, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for drug sensitivity testing. Patients were all treated with standard-of-care TMZ plus radiation with or without maximal surgery, depending on the status of the disease. Patients were prospectively monitored for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Odds ratio (OR) associations of 12-month recurrence, PFS, and OS outcomes were estimated for CSC, bulk tumor, and combined assay responses for the standard-of-care TMZ treatment; sensitivities/specificities, areas under the curve (AUCs), and risk reclassification components were examined. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-49 months). For every 5% increase in in vitro CSC cell kill by TMZ, 12-month patient response (nonrecurrence of cancer) increased two-fold, OR=2.2 (P=.016). Similar but somewhat less supported associations with the bulk tumor test were seen, OR=2.75 (P=.07) for each 5% bulk tumor cell kill by TMZ. Combining CSC and bulk tumor assay results in a single model yielded a statistically supported CSC association, OR=2.36 (P=.036), but a much attenuated remaining bulk tumor association, OR=1.46 (P=.472). AUCs and [sensitivity/specificity] at optimal outpoints (>40% CSC cell kill and >55% bulk tumor cell kill) were AUC=0.989 [sensitivity=100/specificity=97], 0.972 [100/89], and 0.989 [100/97] for the CSC only, bulk tumor only, and combined models, respectively. Risk categorization of patients was improved by 11% when using the CSC test in conjunction with the bulk test (risk reclassification nonevent net reclassification improvement [NRI] and overall NRI=0.111, P=.030). Median recurrence time was 20 months for patients with a positive (>40% cell kill) CSC test versus only 3 months for those with a negative CSC test, whereas median recurrence time was 13 months versus 4 months for patients with a positive (>55% cell kill) bulk test versus negative. Similar favorable results for the CSC test were observed for PFS and OS outcomes. Panel results across 14 potential other treatments indicated that 34/41 (83%) potentially more optimal alternative therapies may have been chosen using CSC results, whereas 27/41 (66%) alternative therapies may have been chosen using bulk tumor results. CONCLUSIONS: The ChemoID CSC drug response assay has the potential to increase the accuracy of bulk tumor assays to help guide individualized chemotherapy choices. GBM cancer recurrence may occur quickly if the CSC test has a low in vitro cell kill rate even if the bulk tumor test cell kill rate is high.  
  Address (up) Department of BioMolecular Sciences, National Center for Natural Products Research, University of Mississippi, University, MS; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center Cancer Institute, Jackson, MS 39216. Electronic address: pclaudio@olemiss.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1936-5233 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28199863 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96608  
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Author Magrath, J.W.; Kim, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salinomycin's potential to eliminate glioblastoma stem cells and treat glioblastoma multiforme (Review) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Oncology Abbreviated Journal Int J Oncol  
  Volume 51 Issue 3 Pages 753-759  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest form of primary brain tumor. Despite treatment with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with the drug temozolomide, the expected survival after diagnosis remains low. The median survival is only 14.6 months and the two-year survival is a mere 30%. One reason for this is the heterogeneity of GBM including the presence of glioblastoma cancer stem cells (GSCs). GSCs are a subset of cells with the unique ability to proliferate, differentiate, and create tumors. GSCs are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and thought to play an important role in recurrence. In order to effectively treat GBM, a drug must be identified that can kill GSCs. The ionophore salinomycin has been shown to kill cancer stem cells and is therefore a promising future treatment for GBM. This study focuses on salinomycin's potential to treat GBM including its ability to reduce the CSC population, its toxicity to normal brain cells, its mechanism of action, and its potential for combination treatment.  
  Address (up) Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0203, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1019-6439 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28766685 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96573  
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Author Corburn, J.; Sverdlik, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Slum Upgrading and Health Equity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Africa; Asia; Climate Change; Employment; Environmental Health; *Health Equity; Housing; Humans; Latin America; *Poverty Areas; Socioeconomic Factors; Urban Health; Urban Population; climate change adaptation; health equity; health in all policies; housing; participation; slum upgrading; slums; social determinants of health; sustainable development goals  
  Abstract Informal settlement upgrading is widely recognized for enhancing shelter and promoting economic development, yet its potential to improve health equity is usually overlooked. Almost one in seven people on the planet are expected to reside in urban informal settlements, or slums, by 2030. Slum upgrading is the process of delivering place-based environmental and social improvements to the urban poor, including land tenure, housing, infrastructure, employment, health services and political and social inclusion. The processes and products of slum upgrading can address multiple environmental determinants of health. This paper reviewed urban slum upgrading evaluations from cities across Asia, Africa and Latin America and found that few captured the multiple health benefits of upgrading. With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focused on improving well-being for billions of city-dwellers, slum upgrading should be viewed as a key strategy to promote health, equitable development and reduce climate change vulnerabilities. We conclude with suggestions for how slum upgrading might more explicitly capture its health benefits, such as through the use of health impact assessment (HIA) and adopting an urban health in all policies (HiAP) framework. Urban slum upgrading must be more explicitly designed, implemented and evaluated to capture its multiple global environmental health benefits.  
  Address (up) Department of City and Regional Planning & School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. sverdlik@berkeley.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28338613 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97044  
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