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Author Saleh, H.M.; Tawfik, M.M.; Abouellail, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, randomized study of long-term hemodialysis catheter removal versus guidewire exchange to treat catheter-related bloodstream infection Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Vascular Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Surg  
  Volume 66 Issue 5 Pages 1427-1431.e1  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/blood/diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects/*instrumentation; Catheters, Indwelling/*adverse effects; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; *Device Removal/adverse effects; Disease-Free Survival; Egypt; Equipment Design; Female; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Long-term (tunneled cuffed) hemodialysis catheters are frequently used vascular access in renal failure patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a common complication of long-term hemodialysis catheters, with severe morbidities and high risk of mortality. Management of CRBSI by systemic antibiotics while keeping the catheter in place is not effective. Among the different modalities of CRBSI management are catheter removal (CR) and guidewire exchange (GE) of the catheter. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with two different strategies: GE vs CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. METHODS: This prospective randomized study analyzed the outcomes of all cases of long-term hemodialysis CRBSI during a 5-year period. The catheter infection-free survival time was analyzed in the two groups of patients (GE group, 339 patients; CR group, 339 patients). Three weeks of systemic antibiotic therapy was used according to culture in both groups. The catheter infection-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in catheter infection-free survival time for GE and CR groups (P = .69), which is not affected by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, or type of causative organism. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with GE or CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. However, guidewire catheter exchange saves veins for future access, reduces the cost and number of procedures, and avoids complications of new venipuncture.  
  Address (up) Department of Nephrology, Ain Shams University, El Demerdash Hospital, Cairo, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-5214 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28822660 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Labriola, L.; Pochet, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Any use for alternative lock solutions in the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Vascular Access Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Access  
  Volume 18 Issue Suppl. 1 Pages 34-38  
  Keywords Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Anticoagulants/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/diagnosis/microbiology/*prevention & control; Biofilms; Catheter-Related Infections/diagnosis/microbiology/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects/*instrumentation; *Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects/microbiology; *Central Venous Catheters/adverse effects/microbiology; Equipment Design; Humans; *Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract The prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) in hemodialysis (HD) patients remains a challenge because of high morbidity and mortality associated to CRBSI. Alternative locking solutions (ALS) containing an antithrombotic substance with additional antimicrobial or antibiofilm properties (citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA], 70% ethanol, thrombolytics) with or without the addition of molecules with specific antimicrobial activity (antibiotics, taurolidine, paraben-methylene-blue) has been proposed with the aim to prevent or eradicate intraluminal biofilm colonization and subsequent CRBSI. In this review, we examine the available evidence concerning their efficacy and potential side effects, in order to determine whether ALS should be implemented widely or only in selected cases.  
  Address (up) Department of Nephrology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels – Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1129-7298 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28297055 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99036  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Labriola, L.; Pochet, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Any use for alternative lock solutions in the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Vascular Access Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Access  
  Volume 18 Issue Suppl. 1 Pages 34-38  
  Keywords Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Anticoagulants/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/diagnosis/microbiology/*prevention & control; Biofilms; Catheter-Related Infections/diagnosis/microbiology/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects/*instrumentation; *Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects/microbiology; *Central Venous Catheters/adverse effects/microbiology; Equipment Design; Humans; *Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract The prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) in hemodialysis (HD) patients remains a challenge because of high morbidity and mortality associated to CRBSI. Alternative locking solutions (ALS) containing an antithrombotic substance with additional antimicrobial or antibiofilm properties (citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA], 70% ethanol, thrombolytics) with or without the addition of molecules with specific antimicrobial activity (antibiotics, taurolidine, paraben-methylene-blue) has been proposed with the aim to prevent or eradicate intraluminal biofilm colonization and subsequent CRBSI. In this review, we examine the available evidence concerning their efficacy and potential side effects, in order to determine whether ALS should be implemented widely or only in selected cases.  
  Address (up) Department of Nephrology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels – Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1129-7298 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28297055 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100066  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Voss, D.M.; Spina, R.; Carter, D.L.; Lim, K.S.; Jeffery, C.J.; Bar, E.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of the monocarboxylate transporter-4-basigin interaction inhibits the hypoxic response, proliferation, and tumor progression Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4292  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We have previously shown that glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are enriched in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, and that monocarboxylate transporter-4 (MCT4) is critical for mediating GSC signaling in hypoxia. Basigin is involved in many physiological functions during early stages of development and in cancer and is required for functional plasma membrane expression of MCT4. We sought to determine if disruption of the MCT-Basigin interaction may be achieved with a small molecule. Using a cell-based drug-screening assay, we identified Acriflavine (ACF), a small molecule that inhibits the binding between Basigin and MCT4. Surface plasmon resonance and cellular thermal-shift-assays confirmed ACF binding to basigin in vitro and in live glioblastoma cells, respectively. ACF significantly inhibited growth and self-renewal potential of several glioblastoma neurosphere lines in vitro, and this activity was further augmented by hypoxia. Finally, treatment of mice bearing GSC-derived xenografts resulted in significant inhibition of tumor progression in early and late-stage disease. ACF treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of VEGF and tumor vascularization. Our work serves as a proof-of-concept as it shows, for the first time, that disruption of MCT binding to their chaperon, Basigin, may be an effective approach to target GSC and to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression.  
  Address (up) Department of Neurological Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH, USA. eli.bar@case.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28655889 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gersey, Z.C.; Rodriguez, G.A.; Barbarite, E.; Sanchez, A.; Walters, W.M.; Ohaeto, K.C.; Komotar, R.J.; Graham, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Curcumin decreases malignant characteristics of glioblastoma stem cells via induction of reactive oxygen species Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Cancer Abbreviated Journal BMC Cancer  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 99  
  Keywords Acetylcysteine/pharmacology; Adult; Antineoplastic Agents/*pharmacology; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cell Survival/drug effects; Curcumin/*pharmacology; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor; Free Radical Scavengers; Glioblastoma/drug therapy/pathology; Humans; Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins/metabolism; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*drug effects; Oxidative Stress; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism; STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Brain tumor; Curcumin; Glioblastoma; Natural product; Reactive oxygen species; Stat3; Stem cell  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of primary brain tumor in adults. Following standard treatment of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, patients are expected to survive 12-14 months. Theorized cause of disease recurrence in these patients is tumor cell repopulation through the proliferation of treatment-resistant cancer stem cells. Current research has revealed curcumin, the principal ingredient in turmeric, can modulate multiple signaling pathways important for cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival. METHODS: Following resection, tumor specimens were dissociated and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) were propagated in neurosphere media and characterized via immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was determined with MTS assay. GSC proliferation, sphere forming and colony forming assays were conducted through standard counting methods. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was examined using the fluorescent molecular probe CM-H2DCFA. Effects on cell signaling pathways were elucidated by western blot. RESULTS: We evaluate the effects of curcumin on patient-derived GSC lines. We demonstrate a curcumin-induced dose-dependent decrease in GSC viability with an approximate IC50 of 25 muM. Treatment with sub-toxic levels (2.5 muM) of curcumin significantly decreased GSC proliferation, sphere forming ability and colony forming potential. Curcumin induced ROS, promoted MAPK pathway activation, downregulated STAT3 activity and IAP family members. Inhibition of ROS with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed these effects indicating a ROS dependent mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: Discoveries made in this investigation may lead to a non-toxic intervention designed to prevent recurrence in glioblastoma by targeting glioblastoma stem cells.  
  Address (up) Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Brain Tumor Initiative (UMBTI) Research Laboratory, Lois Pope LIFE Center, 2nd Floor, 1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, Florida, 33136, USA. rgraham@med.miami.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2407 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28160777 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96610  
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