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Author (up) Basso, C.; Garcia da Rosa, E.; Lairihoy, R.; Caffera, R.M.; Roche, I.; Gonzalez, C.; da Rosa, R.; Gularte, A.; Alfonso-Sierra, E.; Petzold, M.; Kroeger, A.; Sommerfeld, J.
Title Scaling Up of an Innovative Intervention to Reduce Risk of Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Transmission in Uruguay in the Framework of an Intersectoral Approach with and without Community Participation Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abbreviated Journal Am J Trop Med Hyg
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract To contribute to the prevention of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika, a process of scaling up an innovative intervention to reduce Aedes aegypti habitats, was carried out in the city of Salto (Uruguay) based on a transdisciplinary analysis of the eco-bio-social determinants. The intervention in one-third of the city included the distributions of plastic bags for all households to collect all discarded water containers that were recollected by the Ministry of Health and the Municipality vector control services. The results were evaluated in 20 randomly assigned clusters of 100 households each, in the intervention and control arm. The intervention resulted in a significantly larger decrease in the number of pupae per person index (as a proxy for adult vector abundance) than the corresponding decrease in the control areas (both areas decreased by winter effects). The reduction of intervention costs (“incremental costs”) in relation to routine vector control activities was 46%. Community participation increased the collaboration with the intervention program considerably (from 48% of bags handed back out of the total of bags delivered to 59% of bags handed back). Although the costs increased by 26% compared with intervention without community participation, the acceptability of actions by residents increased from 66% to 78%.
Address Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28820690 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97631
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Author (up) Batista, K.M.P.; Eulate-Beramendi, S.A. de; Pina, K.Y.A.R. de; Figueira, P.R.; Canal, A.F.; Chasin, J.M.A.; Meilan, A.; Ugalde, R.; Vega, I.F.
Title Mesenchymal/proangiogenic factor YKL-40 related to glioblastomas and its relationship with the subventricular zone Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Folia Neuropathologica Abbreviated Journal Folia Neuropathol
Volume 55 Issue 1 Pages 14-22
Keywords Ykl-40; glioblastoma; glioblastoma stem cells; subventricular zone
Abstract <i>Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor. Despite multimodality therapy with aggressive microsurgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the median survival is below 15 months. Glioblastomas are heterogeneous tumors with high resistance to most chemotherapeutic drugs. According to reliable evidence, YKL-40, one of the best investigated chitinase-like protein, may facilitate invasion, migration and angiogenesis, and could be also responsible for temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma, thus conferring a dismal prognosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that glioblastoma stem cells give rise to endothelial cells through an YKL-40 influence. Such factor is closely related to the subventricular zone. This review focuses on the most recent theories involving the possible relationship between topographic gliomagenesis related to the subventricular zone and YKL-40.</i>.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1509-572X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28430288 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96592
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Author (up) Behling, F.; Kaltenstadler, M.; Noell, S.; Schittenhelm, J.; Bender, B.; Eckert, F.; Tabatabai, G.; Tatagiba, M.; Skardelly, M.
Title The Prognostic Impact of Ventricular Opening in Glioblastoma Surgery: A Retrospective Single Center Analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication World Neurosurgery Abbreviated Journal World Neurosurg
Volume 106 Issue Pages 615-624
Keywords Extent of resection; Glioblastoma; Hydrocephalus; Overall survival; Prognosis; Tumor volume; Ventricle opening
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Ventricular opening during glioblastoma (GBM) resection is controversial. Sufficient evidence regarding its prognostic role is missing. We investigated the impact of ventricular opening on overall survival (OS), hydrocephalus development, and postoperative morbidity in patients with GBM. METHODS: Patients who underwent primary GBM resection between 2006 and 2013 were assessed retrospectively. Established predictors for overall survival (age, Karnofsky Performance Status, extent of resection, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation status) and further clinical data (postoperative status, further treatment, preoperative tumor volume, proximity to the ventricle) were included in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Thirteen (5.7%) of 229 patients developed a hydrocephalus. Multivariate logistic regression showed that neither ventricular opening, tumor size, proximity to the ventricle, nor extent of resection were significant risk factors for hydrocephalus. Ventricular opening did not delay postoperative therapy and was not associated with neurological morbidity. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients who underwent ventricular opening (n = 114) exhibited a median OS of 14.3 months (12.9-16.5), whereas patients who did not undergo ventricular opening (n = 115) exhibited a median OS of 18.6 months (16.1-20.8). However, multivariate Cox regression (n = 134) did not confirm ventricular opening as an independent negative predictor of OS (risk ratio 1.09, P = 0.77). Instead, it showed that a greater preoperative tumor volume >22.8 cm3 was a negative predictor of OS (risk ratio 1.76, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Because extent of resection is a strong independent predictor of OS and ventricular opening is safe, neurosurgeons should consider ventricular opening to achieve maximal tumor resection.
Address Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Tuebingen, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany; Center for CNS Tumors, Comprehensive Cancer Center Tuebingen Stuttgart, University Hospital Tuebingen, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1878-8750 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28729143 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96576
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Author (up) Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, K.; Reza Saadatzadeh, M.; Wang, H.; Nguyen, A.; Kamocka, M.M.; Cai, W.; Cohen-Gadol, A.A.; Halum, S.L.; Sarkaria, J.N.; Pollok, K.E.; Safa, A.R.
Title Sulforaphane suppresses the growth of glioblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cell-like spheroids, and tumor xenografts through multiple cell signaling pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neurosurgery Abbreviated Journal J Neurosurg
Volume Issue Pages 1-12
Keywords CCCP = carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide; DSB = double-strand break; EGF = epidermal growth factor; FACS = fluorescence-activated cell sorting; FGF = fibroblast growth factor; GBM = glioblastoma; GSC = glioblastoma stem cell; IC50 = 50% inhibition of cell survival; MRC = mitochondrial respiratory chain; MSC = mesenchymal stromal cell; NAC = N-acetylcysteine; NSG = nonobese diabetic scid gamma; PE = phycoerythrin; ROS = reactive oxygen species; SFN = sulforaphane; SSB = single-strand break; apoptosis; cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; oncology; sulforaphane
Abstract OBJECTIVE Defects in the apoptotic machinery and augmented survival signals contribute to drug resistance in glioblastoma (GBM). Moreover, another complexity related to GBM treatment is the concept that GBM development and recurrence may arise from the expression of GBM stem cells (GSCs). Therefore, the use of a multifaceted approach or multitargeted agents that affect specific tumor cell characteristics will likely be necessary to successfully eradicate GBM. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of sulforaphane (SFN)-a constituent of cruciferous vegetables with a multitargeted effect-as a therapeutic agent for GBM. METHODS The inhibitory effects of SFN on established cell lines, early primary cultures, CD133-positive GSCs, GSC-derived spheroids, and GBM xenografts were evaluated using various methods, including GSC isolation and the sphere-forming assay, analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, cell growth inhibition assay, comet assays for assessing SFN-triggered DNA damage, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, and the determination of in vivo efficacy as assessed in human GBM xenograft models. RESULTS SFN triggered the significant inhibition of cell survival and induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with caspase 3 and caspase 7 activation. Moreover, SFN triggered the formation of mitochondrial ROS, and SFN-triggered cell death was ROS dependent. Comet assays revealed that SFN increased single- and double-strand DNA breaks in GBM. Compared with the vehicle control cells, a significantly higher amount of gamma-H2AX foci correlated with an increase in DNA double-strand breaks in the SFN-treated samples. Furthermore, SFN robustly inhibited the growth of GBM cell-induced cell death in established cell cultures and early-passage primary cultures and, most importantly, was effective in eliminating GSCs, which play a major role in drug resistance and disease recurrence. In vivo studies revealed that SFN administration at 100 mg/kg for 5-day cycles repeated for 3 weeks significantly decreased the growth of ectopic xenografts that were established from the early passage of primary cultures of GBM10. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that SFN is a potent anti-GBM agent that targets several apoptosis and cell survival pathways and further preclinical and clinical studies may prove that SFN alone or in combination with other therapies may be potentially useful for GBM therapy.
Address Departments of 2 Pharmacology and Toxicology and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3085 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28059653 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96613
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Author (up) Bischof, J.; Westhoff, M.-A.; Wagner, J.E.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Trentmann, S.; Knippschild, U.; Wirtz, C.R.; Burster, T.
Title Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol
Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 1010428317692227
Keywords Animals; Autophagy; Brain Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology; Cathepsins/*metabolism; Glioblastoma/*metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/*pathology; Proteolysis; *Major histocompatibility complex class I; *autophagy; *cathepsin; *glioblastoma
Abstract One major obstacle in cancer therapy is chemoresistance leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Cancer stem cells, in particular glioblastoma stem cells, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and immune recognition. In case of immune recognition, several survival mechanisms including, regulation of autophagy, proteases, and cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, are found in glioblastoma stem cells. In different pathways, cathepsins play a crucial role in processing functional proteins that are necessary for several processes and proper cell function. Consequently, strategies targeting these pathways in glioblastoma stem cells are promising approaches to interfere with tumor cell survival and will be discussed in this review.
Address 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Surgery Center, Ulm University Medical Center, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28347245 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96600
Permanent link to this record