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Author (up) Achari, R.; Arunsingh, M.; Badgami, R.K.; Saha, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Shrimali, R.K.; Mallick, I.; Arun, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High-dose Neural Stem Cell Radiation May Not Improve Survival in Glioblastoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Clinical Oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)) Abbreviated Journal Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)  
  Volume 29 Issue 6 Pages 335-343  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating/therapeutic use; Brain Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging/pathology/*therapy; *Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant; Contrast Media; DNA Modification Methylases/metabolism; DNA Repair Enzymes/metabolism; Dacarbazine/analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use; Disease-Free Survival; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Glioblastoma/diagnostic imaging/*therapy; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Medication Adherence; Middle Aged; Neural Stem Cells/*radiation effects; Radiotherapy Dosage; Survival Rate; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism; Glioblastoma; neural stem cell; radiation therapy; survival  
  Abstract AIMS: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy dose-volume parameters of neural stem cell (NSC) compartment on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival after post-resection chemoradiation in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with unifocal glioblastoma were included. Ipsilateral (NSCIpsi), contralateral (NSCContra) and combined NSC (NSCCombined) were contoured on radiotherapy planning computerised tomography datasets. NSC dose-volume parameters were correlated with PFS and overall survival. Serial magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to understand the frequency of pre- and post-treatment involvement of the NSC by contrast enhancing lesions (CELs). RESULTS: Baseline involvement of NSC with CELs was seen in 67.2% and 95.9% had CELs and FLAIR abnormalities at progression. With a median follow-up of 14.1 months (interquartile range 9.4-20.6 months), median PFS and overall survival were 14.5 (95% confidence interval 11.6-17.5) and 16.2 (95% confidence interval 13.3-19.2) months, respectively. Poor Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score, advanced recursive partitioning analysis class, unmethylated O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) status, higher than median of mean NSCIpsi dose were associated with significantly inferior PFS and overall survival on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, unmethylated MGMT status, higher than median of mean doses to NSCIpsi and poor compliance to adjuvant temozolomide were independent predictors of inferior survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort, 67.2% of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients had NSC involved with CELs at presentation and 95.9% at progression. This might be an imaging surrogate of the current notion of gliomagenesis and progression from NSC rests. A high radiation dose to NSCIpsi was significantly associated with inferior survival. This could be a function of larger tumours and planning target volumes in those with pre-treatment NSC involvement. Methylated MGMT and good compliance to adjuvant temozolomide were independent predictors of better survival. Until further evidence brings hope for glioblastoma, elective, partial NSC irradiation remains experimental.  
  Address Department of Medical Physics, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0936-6555 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28188088 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96609  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alshehri, M.M.; Robbins, S.M.; Senger, D.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Role of Neurotrophin Signaling in Gliomagenesis: A Focus on the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor (p75NTR/CD271) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Vitamins and Hormones Abbreviated Journal Vitam Horm  
  Volume 104 Issue Pages 367-404  
  Keywords Brain tumor; Cd271; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; Glioma invasion; Nerve growth factor; Neurotrophin; p75(NTR)  
  Abstract The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR, a.k.a. CD271), a transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis family (TNF) of receptors, was originally identified as a nerve growth factor receptor in the mid-1980s. While p75NTR is recognized to have important roles during neural development, its presence in both neural and nonneural tissues clearly supports the potential to mediate a broad range of functions depending on cellular context. Using an unbiased in vivo selection paradigm for genes underlying the invasive behavior of glioma, a critical characteristic that contributes to poor clinical outcome for glioma patients, we identified p75NTR as a central regulator of glioma invasion. Herein we review the expanding role that p75NTR plays in glioma progression with an emphasis on how p75NTR may contribute to the treatment refractory nature of glioma. Based on the observation that p75NTR is expressed and functional in two critical glioma disease reservoirs, namely, the highly infiltrative cells that evade surgical resection, and the radiation- and chemotherapy-resistant brain tumor-initiating cells (also referred to as brain tumor stem cells), we propose that p75NTR and its myriad of downstream signaling effectors represent rationale therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. Lastly, we provide the provocative hypothesis that, in addition to the well-documented cell autonomous signaling functions, the neurotrophins, and their respective receptors, contribute in a cell nonautonomous manner to drive the complex cellular and molecular composition of the brain tumor microenvironment, an environment that fuels tumorigenesis.  
  Address Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. Electronic address: senger@ucalgary.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0083-6729 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28215302 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96606  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ayash, C.; Costas-Muniz, R.; Badreddine, D.; Ramirez, J.; Gany, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Investigation of Unmet Socio-Economic Needs Among Arab American Breast Cancer Patients Compared with Other Immigrant and Migrant Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Community Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Arabs; Breast cancer; Immigrant health  
  Abstract Although Arabs are a growing population in the United States, they are a hidden minority when compared to larger, more studied groups like Latinos and Caribbean immigrants of African descent (CIAD). There is limited research pertaining to patients' unmet socioeconomic and supportive care needs when undergoing breast cancer treatment, particularly among immigrants and migrants. This is a comparative study of a nested cohort of 36 Arabs, 145 Latinos and 128 CIAD breast cancer patients participating in the Integrated Cancer Care Access Network and their areas of needed assistance. The patients were recruited from eleven community cancer clinics in New York City and through community based organizations. Patients most commonly reported needing financial, transportation, and food assistance. Arabs were more likely than their CIAD and Latino counterparts to have health insurance and legal aid needs. Arabs also has the highest proportion of patients unaware of their own cancer stage, at odds with their report of lower information needs than the other groups. Additional culturally tailored Arabic language interventions are needed to educate Arabic speaking breast cancer patients to help facilitate access to available services.  
  Address Arab Health Initiative, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service, 485 Lexington Avenue, 2nd floor, New York, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0094-5145 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28669006 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97265  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ayash, C.; Costas-Muniz, R.; Badreddine, D.; Ramirez, J.; Gany, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Investigation of Unmet Socio-Economic Needs Among Arab American Breast Cancer Patients Compared with Other Immigrant and Migrant Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Community Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Arabs; Breast cancer; Immigrant health  
  Abstract Although Arabs are a growing population in the United States, they are a hidden minority when compared to larger, more studied groups like Latinos and Caribbean immigrants of African descent (CIAD). There is limited research pertaining to patients' unmet socioeconomic and supportive care needs when undergoing breast cancer treatment, particularly among immigrants and migrants. This is a comparative study of a nested cohort of 36 Arabs, 145 Latinos and 128 CIAD breast cancer patients participating in the Integrated Cancer Care Access Network and their areas of needed assistance. The patients were recruited from eleven community cancer clinics in New York City and through community based organizations. Patients most commonly reported needing financial, transportation, and food assistance. Arabs were more likely than their CIAD and Latino counterparts to have health insurance and legal aid needs. Arabs also has the highest proportion of patients unaware of their own cancer stage, at odds with their report of lower information needs than the other groups. Additional culturally tailored Arabic language interventions are needed to educate Arabic speaking breast cancer patients to help facilitate access to available services.  
  Address Arab Health Initiative, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service, 485 Lexington Avenue, 2nd floor, New York, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0094-5145 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28669006 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98018  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Azoulay, M.; Santos, F.; Shenouda, G.; Petrecca, K.; Oweida, A.; Guiot, M.C.; Owen, S.; Panet-Raymond, V.; Souhami, L.; Abdulkarim, B.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Benefit of re-operation and salvage therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: results from a single institution Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume 132 Issue 3 Pages 419-426  
  Keywords Bevacizumab; Glioblastoma; Radiation; Recurrence; Surgery; Temozolomide  
  Abstract The optimal management of recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) has yet to be determined. We aim to assess the benefits of re-operation and salvage therapies (chemotherapy and/or re-irradiation) for recurrent GBM and to identify prognostic factors associated with better survival. All patients who underwent surgery for GBM between January 2005 and December 2012 followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and who developed GBM recurrence on imaging were included in this retrospective study. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox models in order to identify factors associated with overall survival (OS). One hundred and eighty patients treated to a dose of 60 Gy were diagnosed with recurrent GBM. At a median follow-up time of 6.2 months, the median survival (MS) from time of recurrence was 6.6 months. Sixty-nine patients underwent repeat surgery for recurrence based on imaging. To establish the benefits of repeat surgery and salvage therapies, 68 patients who underwent repeat surgery were matched to patients who did not based on extent of initial resection and presence of subventricular zone involvement at recurrence. MS for patients who underwent re-operation was 9.6 months, compared to 5.3 months for patients who did not have repeat surgery (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis in the matched pairs confirmed that repeat surgery with the addition of other salvage treatment can significantly affect patient outcome (HR 0.53). Re-operation with additional salvage therapies for recurrent GBM provides survival prolongation at the time of progression.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Cancer Centre, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada. bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28374095 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96599  
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