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Author (up) McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90  
  Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.  
  Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97634  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90  
  Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.  
  Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Mello, A. de C.; Carvalho, M.S.; Alves, L.C.; Gomes, V.P.; Engstrom, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Food consumption and anthropometry related to the frailty syndrome in low-income community-living elderly in a large city] Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cadernos de Saude Publica Abbreviated Journal Cad Saude Publica  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages e00188815  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Anthropometry; Brazil; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; *Food; Frail Elderly/*statistics & numerical data; Geriatric Assessment; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nutrition Assessment; Nutrition Surveys; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to describe anthropometric and food intake data related to the frailty syndrome in the elderly. This was a cross-sectional study in individuals >/= 60 years of age in a household survey in the Manguinhos neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (n = 137). Frailty syndrome was diagnosed according to Fried et al., anthropometric measures were taken, and a food frequency questionnaire was applied and the results compared to Brazilian Ministry of Health guidelines. In the pre-frail and frail groups, body mass index and measures of central adiposity showed higher levels, while lean muscle parameters showed lower values, proportional to the syndrome's gradation. Frail elderly consumed higher amounts of grains and lower amounts of beans and fruit; pre-frail elderly consumed more vegetables, dairy products, and high-sugar and high-fat foods; the two groups consumed similar amounts of meat. Thus, diagnosis of the syndrome, anthropometric evaluation, and dietary assessment should be included in health policies for the elderly, since they assist in early identification of risk and favor interventions for disease prevention and health and nutritional promotion.  
  Address Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title Consumo alimentar e antropometria relacionados a sindrome de fragilidade em idosos residentes em comunidade de baixa renda de um grande centro urbano  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0102-311X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28832786 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98007  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 82  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.  
  Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99123  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 82  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.  
  Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100153  
Permanent link to this record
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