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Author (up) Mercatelli, N.; Galardi, S.; Ciafre, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title MicroRNAs as Multifaceted Players in Glioblastoma Multiforme Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal Int Rev Cell Mol Biol  
  Volume 333 Issue Pages 269-323  
  Keywords Biomarker; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; MicroRNAs; Microenvironment; OncomomiRs; Therapy; Tumor suppressors  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and inevitably lethal primary brain tumor, with a median survival rate of only 15 months from diagnosis. The current standard treatment involves maximal surgical resection flanked by radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide. However, even such aggressive treatment is never curative, and recurrent tumors always arise, commonly in more aggressive, chemo- and radio-resistant forms, leading to untreatable and deadly tumors. MicroRNAs, recognized major players in cancer, are deeply involved in GBM, as shown by more than a decade of studies. In this review, we revise the main milestones of MicroRNA studies in GBM, and the latest relevant discoveries in this field. Examples are given of MicroRNAs working as “oncomiRs” or tumor suppressors, with specific connections with GBM clinical subtypes, patients' survival, and resistance to therapies. As the interaction of GBM cells with the microenvironment was proven as a key determinant of tumor growth, the role of MicroRNAs in GBM microenvironment, tumor angiogenesis, and tumor-secreted microvesicles is also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the latest findings presenting MicroRNAs as possible therapeutic targets for GBM, or their use as circulating biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis.  
  Address Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1937-6448 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28729027 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96577  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Miguel, M.G.; Barreto, R.P.; Pereira, S.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study of a tropical soil in order to use it to retain aluminum, iron, manganese and fluoride from acid mine drainage Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 204 Issue Pt 1 Pages 563-570  
  Keywords Acid mine drainage; Column test; Contaminant transport; Liner; Tropical soils; Waste rock pile  
  Abstract The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM-Caldas), in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil, nowadays in decommissioning stage, was the first uranium extraction mine in Brazil. Several negative environmental impacts in the area have occurred, because of mining, treatment and beneficiation processes. Waste rock pile 4 (WRP-4) generates acid mine drainage (AMD), which is discharged in the Nestor Figueiredo retention pond (NFP). However, leakage of acid water by the NFP dam foundation has been constantly observed. Therefore, this research aimed to investigate a typical tropical soil, in order to use it as mineral liner for the NFP to minimize the leakage of acid water through the dam foundation and to retain predominant chemical species. Geotechnical, chemical and mineralogical tests were performed to characterize the soil and a column test was carried out using the acid mine drainage as contaminant, which contained aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and fluoride (F-). The soil presented micro aggregation, acid pH, and low values of organic matter content and cation exchange capacity, which are characteristics of highly weathered soils. Diffusion was the predominant transport mechanism in the column test. Effluent solutions with pH less than 6.0 indicated the formation of insoluble Al-F complexes in the soil and desorption of iron and manganese at concentrations above those allowed by the Brazilian legislation. At pH greater than 6.0, the desorption of iron and manganese and release of aluminum and fluoride in the free form occurred, with concentrations also higher than the allowed by the Brazilian legislation.  
  Address Institute of Geoscience, University of Campinas (Unicamp), Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28942188 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97504  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Mihu, M.R.; Cabral, V.; Pattabhi, R.; Tar, M.T.; Davies, K.P.; Friedman, A.J.; Martinez, L.R.; Nosanchuk, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Interfere with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in a Rat Central Venous Catheter Model Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Abbreviated Journal Antimicrob Agents Chemother  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/*drug effects/growth & development; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Chitosan/chemistry/pharmacology; Delayed-Action Preparations; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Glucose/chemistry; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development/ultrastructure; Nanoparticles/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Nitric Oxide/chemical synthesis/*pharmacology; Oxidation-Reduction; Plankton/drug effects/growth & development; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Sodium Nitrite/chemistry; Staphylococcal Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; antimicrobials; biofilms; nanoparticles; nitric oxide  
  Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is frequently isolated in the setting of infections of indwelling medical devices, which are mediated by the microbe's ability to form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts and often cause chronic infections and sepsis, particularly in patients with prolonged hospitalizations. In this study, we demonstrate that sustained nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) interfere with S. aureus adhesion and prevent biofilm formation on a rat central venous catheter (CVC) model of infection. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy showed that NO-np-treated staphylococcal biofilms displayed considerably reduced thicknesses and bacterial numbers compared to those of control biofilms in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Although both phenotypes, planktonic and biofilm-associated staphylococci, of multiple clinical strains were susceptible to NO-np, bacteria within biofilms were more resistant to killing than their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, chitosan, a biopolymer found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and structurally integrated into the nanoparticles, seems to add considerable antimicrobial activity to the technology. Our findings suggest promising development and translational potential of NO-np for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic against bacterial biofilms on CVCs and other medical devices.  
  Address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0066-4804 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27821454 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Mihu, M.R.; Cabral, V.; Pattabhi, R.; Tar, M.T.; Davies, K.P.; Friedman, A.J.; Martinez, L.R.; Nosanchuk, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Interfere with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in a Rat Central Venous Catheter Model Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Abbreviated Journal Antimicrob Agents Chemother  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/*drug effects/growth & development; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Chitosan/chemistry/pharmacology; Delayed-Action Preparations; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Glucose/chemistry; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development/ultrastructure; Nanoparticles/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Nitric Oxide/chemical synthesis/*pharmacology; Oxidation-Reduction; Plankton/drug effects/growth & development; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Sodium Nitrite/chemistry; Staphylococcal Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; antimicrobials; biofilms; nanoparticles; nitric oxide  
  Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is frequently isolated in the setting of infections of indwelling medical devices, which are mediated by the microbe's ability to form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts and often cause chronic infections and sepsis, particularly in patients with prolonged hospitalizations. In this study, we demonstrate that sustained nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) interfere with S. aureus adhesion and prevent biofilm formation on a rat central venous catheter (CVC) model of infection. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy showed that NO-np-treated staphylococcal biofilms displayed considerably reduced thicknesses and bacterial numbers compared to those of control biofilms in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Although both phenotypes, planktonic and biofilm-associated staphylococci, of multiple clinical strains were susceptible to NO-np, bacteria within biofilms were more resistant to killing than their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, chitosan, a biopolymer found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and structurally integrated into the nanoparticles, seems to add considerable antimicrobial activity to the technology. Our findings suggest promising development and translational potential of NO-np for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic against bacterial biofilms on CVCs and other medical devices.  
  Address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0066-4804 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27821454 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100161  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Miranda, A.; Blanco-Prieto, M.; Sousa, J.; Pais, A.; Vitorino, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breaching barriers in glioblastoma. Part I: Molecular pathways and novel treatment approaches Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Pharmaceutics Abbreviated Journal Int J Pharm  
  Volume 531 Issue 1 Pages 372-388  
  Keywords Glioblastoma; Molecular mechanisms; Temozolomide; Therapeutic advances; Therapeutic resistance  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour, and the most aggressive in nature. The prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor, with a median survival time of only 1-2 years. The treatment failure relies on the development of resistance by tumour cells and the difficulty of ensuring that drugs effectively cross the dual blood brain barrier/blood brain tumour barrier. The advanced molecular and genetic knowledge has allowed to identify the mechanisms responsible for temozolomide resistance, which represents the standard of care in GBM, along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Such resistance has motivated the researchers to investigate new avenues for GBM treatment intended to improve patient survival. In this review, we provide an overview of major obstacles to effective treatment of GBM, encompassing biological barriers, cancer stem cells, DNA repair mechanisms, deregulated signalling pathways and autophagy. New insights and potential therapy approaches for GBM are also discussed, emphasizing localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain, immunotherapy, gene therapy and nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery.  
  Address Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Pharmacometrics Group of the Centre for Neurosciences and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address: csvitorino@ff.uc.pt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-5173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28755993 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96574  
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