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Author (up) Patino, A.; Alcalde, V.; Gutierrez, C.; Romero, M.G.; Carrillo, A.M.; Vargas, L.E.; Vallejo, C.E.; Zarama, V.; Mora Rodriguez, J.L.; Bustos, Y.; Granada, J.; Aguiar, L.G.; Menendez, S.; Cohen, J.I.; Saavedra, M.A.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Roldan, T.; Arbelaez, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in Colombia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Abbreviated Journal West J Emerg Med  
  Volume 18 Issue 6 Pages 1120-1127  
  Keywords  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Emergency medicine (EM) is in different stages of development around the world. Colombia has made significant strides in EM development in the last two decades and recognized it as a medical specialty in 2005. The country now has seven EM residency programs: three in the capital city of Bogota, two in Medellin, one in Manizales, and one in Cali. The seven residency programs are in different stages of maturity, with the oldest founded 20 years ago and two founded in the last two years. The objective of this study was to characterize these seven residency programs. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with faculty and residents from all the existing programs in 2013-2016. Topics included program characteristics and curricula. RESULTS: Colombian EM residencies are three-year programs, with the exception of one four-year program. Programs accept 3-10 applicants yearly. Only one program has free tuition and the rest charge tuition. The number of EM faculty ranges from 2-15. EM rotation requirements range from 11-33% of total clinical time. One program does not have a pediatric rotation. The other programs require 1-2 months of pediatrics or pediatric EM. Critical care requirements range from 4-7 months. Other common rotations include anesthesia, general surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, radiology, toxicology, psychiatry, neurology, cardiology, pulmonology, and trauma. All programs offer 4-6 hours of protected didactic time each week. Some programs require Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support and Advanced Trauma Life Support, with some programs providing these trainings in-house or subsidizing the cost. Most programs require one research project for graduation. Resident evaluations consist of written tests and oral exams several times per year. Point-of-care ultrasound training is provided in four of the seven programs. CONCLUSION: As emergency medicine continues to develop in Colombia, more residency programs are expected to emerge. Faculty development and sustainability of academic pursuits will be critically important. In the long term, the specialty will need to move toward certifying board exams and professional development through a national EM organization to promote standardization across programs.  
  Address Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital / Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1936-900X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29085546 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97625  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Perez-Martinez, P.J.; de Fatima Andrade, M.; de Miranda, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Heavy truck restrictions and air quality implications in Sao Paulo, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 202 Issue Pt 1 Pages 55-68  
  Keywords Air pollution trends; Sao Paulo; Traffic-pollutant relationships; Transport emission factors  
  Abstract This study quantified the effects of traffic restrictions on diesel fuel heavy vehicles (HVs) on the air quality of the Bandeirantes corridor using hourly data obtained by continuous monitoring of traffic and air quality at sites located on this avenue. The study addressed the air quality of a city impacted by vehicular emissions and that PM10 and NOX concentrations are mainly due to diesel burning. Data collection was split into two time periods, a period of no traffic constraint on HVs (Nov 2008 and 2009) and a period of constraint (Nov 2010, 2011 and 2012). We found that pollutants on this corridor, mainly PM10 and NOX, decreased significantly during the period from 2008 to 2012 (28 and 43%, 15.8 and 86.9 ppb) as a direct consequence of HV traffic restrictions (a 72% reduction). Rebound effects in the form of increased traffic of light vehicles (LVs) during this time had impacts on the concentration levels, explaining the differences between rates of reduction in HV traffic and pollutants. Reductions in the number of trucks resulted in longer travel times and increased traffic congestion as a consequence of the modal shift towards LVs. We found that a 51% decrease in PM10 (28.8 mug m-3) was due to a reduction in HV traffic (vehicle emissions were estimated to be 71% of total sources, 40.1 mug m-3). This percentage was partially offset by 10% more PM10 emissions related to an increase in LV traffic, while other causes, such as climatic conditions, contributed to a 13% increase in PM10 concentrations. The relationships analyzed in this research served to highlight the need to apply urban transport policies aimed at decreasing pollutant concentrations in Sao Paulo, especially in heavily congested urban corridors on working days.  
  Address School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28719822 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97508  
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Author (up) Phanthaphol, N.; Techasen, A.; Loilome, W.; Thongchot, S.; Thanan, R.; Sungkhamanon, S.; Khuntikeo, N.; Yongvanit, P.; Namwat, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Upregulation of TCTP is associated with cholangiocarcinoma progression and metastasis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Oncology Letters Abbreviated Journal Oncol Lett  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 64, 65  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1792-1074 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98395  
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Author (up) Pinsky, I.; Noto, A.R.; Botequio de Moraes, M.C.; Lucas Dos Santos, E.; Sparks, R.; O'Brien, K. url  openurl
  Title Alcohol Industry Sponsorship of University Student Sports Clubs in Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs Abbreviated Journal J Stud Alcohol Drugs  
  Volume 78 Issue 2 Pages 306-312  
  Keywords Alcohol Drinking/*economics; Brazil; Commerce; Humans; Marketing/*economics; Perception; *Sports; Students; *Universities  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The university sport environment represents an important target for alcohol industry marketing. This study investigated the nature of relationships between the alcohol industry and university student sports clubs (USSCs). METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with board members from 60 active USSCs in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed and subjected to content analysis using NVivo10. RESULTS: All invited USSCs participated in the study. Most (n = 53; 88%) reported having signed contracts with the alcohol industry (breweries, in every case) to have their sports events and parties sponsored. The most common sponsorship arrangement involved the supply of discounted beer for sport and student events. T-shirts, beer freezers, and stereo systems were also frequently provided by the alcohol industry to support alcohol-related sports events. In addition, the alcohol industry event promoters helped market the events and products. In return, the USSCs agreed to exclusively sell the sponsors' brand of beer and/or order and sell a quota of beer at their events. Forty-nine interviewees (81%) reported agreements with alcohol companies whereby open bars (free alcohol events) would also be provided. Despite reporting a range of alcohol harms, participants did not perceive there to be a high risk of harm from the alcohol sponsorship arrangements. CONCLUSIONS: Most USSCs in Sao Paulo, Brazil, have formalized contracts with the alcohol industry that promote the marketing, sale, and consumption of alcohol at parties and university games. A critical review of the impacts of these practices and university policies on alcohol industry sponsorship that can take account of the role of such arrangements in student drinking is warranted.  
  Address School of Social Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1937-1888 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28317512 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97333  
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Author (up) Piovezan, R.D.; Hirotsu, C.; Feres, M.C.; Cintra, F.D.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Poyares, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obstructive sleep apnea and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of serum vitamin D deficiency Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0180901  
  Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Humans; Hypertension/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity/physiopathology; Polysomnography; Risk Factors; Sedentary Lifestyle; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep/physiology; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Sleep Wake Disorders/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Smoking/physiopathology; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vitamin D/*blood; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies demonstrate an association between vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and sleep disturbances, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration. However, to date, no studies have concurrently and objectively evaluated the effect of these factors on 25(OH)D. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether OSA and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with reduced 25(OH)D in an adult population sample. METHODS: A cross-sectional study included 657 individuals from the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, as part of the ERA project. Participants fulfilled questionnaires and underwent clinical evaluation, polysomnography and blood sample collection for 25(OH)D quantification. OSA was classified into three categories (mild, moderate and severe). The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was considered as levels<30 ng/mL. Short sleep duration was defined as total sleep time<6 hours. RESULTS: The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was observed in 59.5% of the sample, affecting more individuals of the female gender, obese, with African American ethnicity, and those that were smokers, sedentary and presented hypertension and diabetes. In the final logistic model adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, obesity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, seasonality and creatinine serum levels, both OSA and short sleep duration showed significant independent associations with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency (moderate OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.35-3.64, p<0.01; severe OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.06-3.00, p = 0.03; short sleep duration: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.15-2.26, p = 0.01). After a subgroup analysis, similar results were observed only in participants >/=50 years. CONCLUSION: OSA and short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency in an adult population. Age-related changes in vitamin D metabolism and the frequency of sleep disorders may be involved in these associations. Future studies exploring whether 25(OH)D levels may modulate OSA and sleep curtailment-related outcomes are needed.  
  Address Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28686746 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98016  
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