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Author Gomes, F. da S.; Silva, G.A.E.; Castro, I.R.R. de
Title [Household purchase of sodas and cookies reduces the effect of an intervention to promote the consumption of fruits and vegetables] Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Cadernos de Saude Publica Abbreviated Journal Cad Saude Publica
Volume 33 Issue 3 Pages (down) e00023316
Keywords Beverages/*statistics & numerical data; Brazil; Candy/*statistics & numerical data; Diet Surveys; *Feeding Behavior; Female; *Fruit; *Health Promotion; Humans; Male; Socioeconomic Factors; *Vegetables
Abstract This study examines the influence of increasing household availability of sodas and cookies on the effects of an intervention to promote the consumption of fruits and vegetables. The study analyzed data from 70 families living in low-income communities in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, selected in a stratified probabilistic sample, and who completed a 30-day food record before and after the intervention. The intervention contributed to a significant increase in the household availability of fruit and vegetables (+2.7 p.p.; 95%CI: 1.5; 4.0), contrary to the trend towards stagnation of such availability in the general population in Brazil. Meanwhile, the purchase of sodas and cookies, which was not the intervention's target, mirrored the upward trend in the consumption of these products (+5.8 p.p.; 95%CI: 3.3; 8.4). Families that increased their purchase of sodas and cookies showed lower increases, or even decreases, in the purchase of fruits and vegetables (p < 0.05), and had nearly fourfold lower odds of experiencing any increase in the household availability of fruits and vegetables.
Address Instituto de Nutricao, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title Aquisicao domiciliar de refrigerantes e de biscoitos reduz o efeito de uma intervencao de promocao de frutas e hortalicas
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0102-311X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28380139 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98025
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Author Sullivan, K.E.; Rojas, K.; Cerione, R.A.; Nakano, I.; Wilson, K.F.
Title The stem cell/cancer stem cell marker ALDH1A3 regulates the expression of the survival factor tissue transglutaminase, in mesenchymal glioma stem cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Oncotarget Abbreviated Journal Oncotarget
Volume 8 Issue 14 Pages (down) 22325-22343
Keywords Aldehyde Oxidoreductases/genetics/*metabolism; Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism; Brain Neoplasms/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Dacarbazine/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology; GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Glioma/genetics/*metabolism; Humans; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells/*physiology; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*physiology; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics; Stem Cells/*physiology; Transglutaminases/genetics/*metabolism; Tretinoin/metabolism; Up-Regulation; aldehyde dehydrogenase; cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; retinoic acid; tissue transglutaminase
Abstract Tissue transglutaminase (tTG), a dual-function enzyme with GTP-binding and acyltransferase activities, has been implicated in the survival and chemotherapy resistance of aggressive cancer cells and cancer stem cells, including glioma stem cells (GSCs). Using a model system comprising two distinct subtypes of GSCs referred to as proneural (PN) and mesenchymal (MES), we find that the phenotypically aggressive and radiation therapy-resistant MES GSCs exclusively express tTG relative to PN GSCs. As such, the self-renewal, proliferation, and survival of these cells was sensitive to treatment with tTG inhibitors, with a benefit being observed when combined with the standard of care for high grade gliomas (i.e. radiation or temozolomide). Efforts to understand the molecular drivers of tTG expression in MES GSCs revealed an unexpected link between tTG and a common marker for stem cells and cancer stem cells, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3). ALDH1A3, as well as other members of the ALDH1 subfamily, can function in cells as a retinaldehyde dehydrogenase to generate retinoic acid (RA) from retinal. We show that the enzymatic activity of ALDH1A3 and its product, RA, are necessary for the observed expression of tTG in MES GSCs. Additionally, the ectopic expression of ALDH1A3 in PN GSCs is sufficient to induce the expression of tTG in these cells, further demonstrating a causal link between ALDH1A3 and tTG. Together, these findings ascribe a novel function for ALDH1A3 in an aggressive GSC phenotype via the up-regulation of tTG, and suggest the potential for a similar role by ALDH1 family members across cancer types.
Address Department of Molecular Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1949-2553 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28423611 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96595
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Author Cruz, M.F. da; Ramires, V.V.; Wendt, A.; Mielke, G.I.; Martinez-Mesa, J.; Wehrmeister, F.C.
Title [Simultaneity of risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases in the elderly in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil] Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Cadernos de Saude Publica Abbreviated Journal Cad Saude Publica
Volume 33 Issue 2 Pages (down) e00021916
Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcoholism/epidemiology; Brazil/epidemiology; Chronic Disease/*epidemiology; Cluster Analysis; Cross-Sectional Studies; Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity/epidemiology; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Smoking/epidemiology; Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract This study aimed to describe the simultaneity of risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases among the elderly (</= 60 years) in a city in Southern Brazil. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,451 elderly in 2013. Cluster analysis was applied to selected risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, excess weight, and physical inactivity). Logistic regression was used to assess the association between simultaneity of risk factors and socio-demographic variables. The most frequent cluster in men (18.1%) and women (30.7%) was physical inactivity + excess weight. The cluster alcohol consumption + excess weight exceeded the expected level in men (O/E = 1.27; 95%CI: 1.01; 1.59) and women (O/E = 1.72; 95%CI: 1.35; 2.20). The presence of two or more risk factors in the elderly population (88.1%) points to the need for specific interventions for this population to fight risk factors simultaneously rather than separately.
Address Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, Brasil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title Simultaneidade de fatores de risco para doencas cronicas nao transmissiveis entre idosos da zona urbana de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0102-311X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28403276 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98024
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ramke, J.; Petkovic, J.; Welch, V.; Blignault, I.; Gilbert, C.; Blanchet, K.; Christensen, R.; Zwi, A.B.; Tugwell, P.
Title Interventions to improve access to cataract surgical services and their impact on equity in low- and middle-income countries Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Volume 11 Issue Pages (down) Cd011307
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and the prevalence is inequitably distributed between and within countries. Interventions have been undertaken to improve cataract surgical services, however, the effectiveness of these interventions on promoting equity is not known. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects on equity of interventions to improve access to cataract services for populations with cataract blindness (and visual impairment) in LMICs. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 3), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 12 April 2017), Embase Ovid (1980 to 12 April 2017), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to 12 April 2017), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch); searched 12 April 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 12 April 2017 and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 12 April 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included studies that reported on strategies to improve access to cataract services in LMICs using the following study designs: randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies. Included studies were conducted in LMICs, and were targeted at disadvantaged populations, or disaggregated outcome data by 'PROGRESS-Plus' factors (Place of residence; Race/ethnicity/ culture/ language; Occupation; Gender/sex; Religion; Education; Socio-economic status; Social capital/networks. The 'Plus' component includes disability, sexual orientation and age). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors (JR and JP) independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed them for risk of bias. Meta-analysis was not possible, so included studies were synthesised in table and text. MAIN RESULTS: From a total of 2865 studies identified in the search, two met our eligibility criteria, both of which were cluster-RCTs conducted in rural China. The way in which the trials were conducted means that the risk of bias is unclear. In both studies, villages were randomised to be either an intervention or control group. Adults identified with vision-impairing cataract, following village-based vision and eye health assessment, either received an intervention to increase uptake of cataract surgery (if their village was an intervention group), or to receive 'standard care' (if their village was a control group).One study (n = 434), randomly allocated 26 villages or townships to the intervention, which involved watching an informational video and receiving counselling about cataract and cataract surgery, while the control group were advised that they had decreased vision due to cataract and it could be treated, without being shown the video or receiving counselling. There was low-certainty evidence that providing information and counselling had no effect on uptake of referral to the hospital (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.67, 1 RCT, 434 participants) and little or no effect on the uptake of surgery (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.84, 1 RCT, 434 participants). We assessed the level of evidence to be of low-certainty for both outcomes, due to indirectness of evidence and imprecision of results.The other study (n = 355, 24 towns randomised) included three intervention arms: free surgery; free surgery plus reimbursement of transport costs; and free surgery plus free transport to and from the hospital. These were compared to the control group, which was reminded to use the “low-cost” ( USD 38) surgical service. There was low-certainty evidence that surgical fee waiver with/without transport provision or reimbursement increased uptake of surgery (RR 1.94, 95% CI 1.14 to 3.31, 1 RCT, 355 participants). We assessed the level of evidence to be of low-certainty due to indirectness of evidence and imprecision of results.Neither of the studies reported our primary outcome of change in prevalence of cataract blindness, or other outcomes such as cataract surgical coverage, surgical outcome, or adverse effects. Neither study disaggregated outcomes by social subgroups to enable further assessment of equity effects. We sought data from both studies and obtained data from one; the information video and counselling intervention did not have a differential effect across the PROGRESS-Plus categories with available data (place of residence, gender, education level, socioeconomic status and social capital). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence on the effect on equity of interventions to improve access to cataract services in LMICs is limited. We identified only two studies, both conducted in rural China. Assessment of equity effects will be improved if future studies disaggregate outcomes by relevant social subgroups. To assist with assessing generalisability of findings to other settings, robust data on contextual factors are also needed.
Address School of Population Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1361-6137 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29119547 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97501
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ramke, J.; Petkovic, J.; Welch, V.; Blignault, I.; Gilbert, C.; Blanchet, K.; Christensen, R.; Zwi, A.B.; Tugwell, P.
Title Interventions to improve access to cataract surgical services and their impact on equity in low- and middle-income countries Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Volume 11 Issue Pages (down) Cd011307
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and the prevalence is inequitably distributed between and within countries. Interventions have been undertaken to improve cataract surgical services, however, the effectiveness of these interventions on promoting equity is not known. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects on equity of interventions to improve access to cataract services for populations with cataract blindness (and visual impairment) in LMICs. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 3), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 12 April 2017), Embase Ovid (1980 to 12 April 2017), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to 12 April 2017), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch); searched 12 April 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 12 April 2017 and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 12 April 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included studies that reported on strategies to improve access to cataract services in LMICs using the following study designs: randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies. Included studies were conducted in LMICs, and were targeted at disadvantaged populations, or disaggregated outcome data by 'PROGRESS-Plus' factors (Place of residence; Race/ethnicity/ culture/ language; Occupation; Gender/sex; Religion; Education; Socio-economic status; Social capital/networks. The 'Plus' component includes disability, sexual orientation and age). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors (JR and JP) independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed them for risk of bias. Meta-analysis was not possible, so included studies were synthesised in table and text. MAIN RESULTS: From a total of 2865 studies identified in the search, two met our eligibility criteria, both of which were cluster-RCTs conducted in rural China. The way in which the trials were conducted means that the risk of bias is unclear. In both studies, villages were randomised to be either an intervention or control group. Adults identified with vision-impairing cataract, following village-based vision and eye health assessment, either received an intervention to increase uptake of cataract surgery (if their village was an intervention group), or to receive 'standard care' (if their village was a control group).One study (n = 434), randomly allocated 26 villages or townships to the intervention, which involved watching an informational video and receiving counselling about cataract and cataract surgery, while the control group were advised that they had decreased vision due to cataract and it could be treated, without being shown the video or receiving counselling. There was low-certainty evidence that providing information and counselling had no effect on uptake of referral to the hospital (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.67, 1 RCT, 434 participants) and little or no effect on the uptake of surgery (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.84, 1 RCT, 434 participants). We assessed the level of evidence to be of low-certainty for both outcomes, due to indirectness of evidence and imprecision of results.The other study (n = 355, 24 towns randomised) included three intervention arms: free surgery; free surgery plus reimbursement of transport costs; and free surgery plus free transport to and from the hospital. These were compared to the control group, which was reminded to use the “low-cost” ( USD 38) surgical service. There was low-certainty evidence that surgical fee waiver with/without transport provision or reimbursement increased uptake of surgery (RR 1.94, 95% CI 1.14 to 3.31, 1 RCT, 355 participants). We assessed the level of evidence to be of low-certainty due to indirectness of evidence and imprecision of results.Neither of the studies reported our primary outcome of change in prevalence of cataract blindness, or other outcomes such as cataract surgical coverage, surgical outcome, or adverse effects. Neither study disaggregated outcomes by social subgroups to enable further assessment of equity effects. We sought data from both studies and obtained data from one; the information video and counselling intervention did not have a differential effect across the PROGRESS-Plus categories with available data (place of residence, gender, education level, socioeconomic status and social capital). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence on the effect on equity of interventions to improve access to cataract services in LMICs is limited. We identified only two studies, both conducted in rural China. Assessment of equity effects will be improved if future studies disaggregate outcomes by relevant social subgroups. To assist with assessing generalisability of findings to other settings, robust data on contextual factors are also needed.
Address School of Population Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1361-6137 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29119547 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97624
Permanent link to this record