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Author Phanthaphol, N.; Techasen, A.; Loilome, W.; Thongchot, S.; Thanan, R.; Sungkhamanon, S.; Khuntikeo, N.; Yongvanit, P.; Namwat, N.
Title Upregulation of TCTP is associated with cholangiocarcinoma progression and metastasis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Oncology Letters Abbreviated Journal Oncol Lett
Volume Issue Pages (up)
Keywords 64, 65
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1792-1074 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98395
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hudgins, J.D.; Goldberg, V.; Fell, G.L.; Puder, M.; Eisenberg, M.A.
Title Reducing Time to Antibiotics in Children With Intestinal Failure, Central Venous Line, and Fever Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Pediatrics
Volume 140 Issue 5 Pages (up)
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage; Bacteremia/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Female; Fever/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Humans; Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Length of Stay/*trends; Male; Short Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Time-to-Treatment
Abstract BACKGROUND: Children with intestinal failure (IF) on parenteral nutrition (PN) are at high risk for bacteremia, and delays in antibiotic administration have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We designed an emergency department (ED) quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce time to administration of intravenous antibiotics in febrile children with IF on PN. METHODS: Our aim was to decrease the mean time for febrile children with IF on PN to receive intravenous antibiotics by 50% to <60 minutes over a 12-month period. Secondary outcome measures were ED, hospital, and ICU length of stay (LOS). Our process measure was the rate of ordering recommended antibiotics, and our balancing measure was the rate of hypoglycemia. Interventions included increasing provider knowledge of IF, streamlining order entry, providing individualized feedback, and standardizing the triage process. Results were analyzed by using statistical process control methodology and time series analysis. RESULTS: We identified 149 eligible ED patients, of which 62 (41.6%) had bacteremia. The mean time to antibiotics decreased after the onset of the QI initiative from 112 to 39 minutes, and the ED LOS decreased from 286 to 247 minutes, but the total length of hospital and ICU stays were unchanged. The rate of hypoglycemia was also unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Our QI intervention for febrile children with IF on PN shortened the time to receive antibiotics. Larger studies are needed to demonstrate the impact on overall LOS and mortality.
Address Division of Emergency Medicine and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-4005 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29066581 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98935
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Author Mihu, M.R.; Cabral, V.; Pattabhi, R.; Tar, M.T.; Davies, K.P.; Friedman, A.J.; Martinez, L.R.; Nosanchuk, J.D.
Title Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Interfere with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in a Rat Central Venous Catheter Model Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Abbreviated Journal Antimicrob Agents Chemother
Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages (up)
Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/*drug effects/growth & development; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Chitosan/chemistry/pharmacology; Delayed-Action Preparations; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Glucose/chemistry; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development/ultrastructure; Nanoparticles/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Nitric Oxide/chemical synthesis/*pharmacology; Oxidation-Reduction; Plankton/drug effects/growth & development; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Sodium Nitrite/chemistry; Staphylococcal Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; antimicrobials; biofilms; nanoparticles; nitric oxide
Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is frequently isolated in the setting of infections of indwelling medical devices, which are mediated by the microbe's ability to form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts and often cause chronic infections and sepsis, particularly in patients with prolonged hospitalizations. In this study, we demonstrate that sustained nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) interfere with S. aureus adhesion and prevent biofilm formation on a rat central venous catheter (CVC) model of infection. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy showed that NO-np-treated staphylococcal biofilms displayed considerably reduced thicknesses and bacterial numbers compared to those of control biofilms in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Although both phenotypes, planktonic and biofilm-associated staphylococci, of multiple clinical strains were susceptible to NO-np, bacteria within biofilms were more resistant to killing than their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, chitosan, a biopolymer found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and structurally integrated into the nanoparticles, seems to add considerable antimicrobial activity to the technology. Our findings suggest promising development and translational potential of NO-np for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic against bacterial biofilms on CVCs and other medical devices.
Address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0066-4804 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27821454 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99131
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Author Rogers, A.E.J.; Eisenman, K.M.; Dolan, S.A.; Belderson, K.M.; Zauche, J.R.; Tong, S.; Gralla, J.; Hilden, J.M.; Wang, M.; Maloney, K.W.; Dominguez, S.R.
Title Risk factors for bacteremia and central line-associated blood stream infections in children with acute myelogenous leukemia: A single-institution report Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Pediatric Blood & Cancer Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Blood Cancer
Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages (up)
Keywords Adolescent; Bacteremia/*etiology; Bacteria/isolation & purification; Case-Control Studies; Catheter-Related Infections/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection/*etiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*complications/microbiology; Male; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Clabsi; acute myelogenous leukemia; bacteremia; pediatric oncology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) are a source of high morbidity and mortality in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). PROCEDURE: To understand the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the development of CLABSI in children with AML. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with AML over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011 at the Children's Hospital Colorado. Cases and controls were classified on the basis of the presence of a CLABSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network. RESULTS: Of 40 patients in the study, 25 (62.5%) developed at least one CLABSI during therapy. The majority of CLABSIs were due to oral or gastrointestinal organisms (83.0%). Skin organisms accounted for 8.5%. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest risk factors associated with CLABSI were diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-28.7), receipt of blood products in the preceding 4-7 days (OR 10.0, 95%CI 3.2-31.0), not receiving antibiotics (OR 8.3, 95%CI 2.8-25.0), and chemotherapy cycle (OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-8.9). CLABSIs led to increased morbidity, with 13 cases (32.5%) versus two controls (1.9%) requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Three (7.5%) of 40 CLABSI events resulted in or contributed to death. CONCLUSIONS: Intensified line care efforts cannot eliminate all CLABSIs in the patients with AML. Exploring the role of mucosal barrier breakdown and/or the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective strategies for further prevention of CLABSIs, supporting ongoing trials in this patient population.
Address Department of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1545-5009 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27616655 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99291
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hudgins, J.D.; Goldberg, V.; Fell, G.L.; Puder, M.; Eisenberg, M.A.
Title Reducing Time to Antibiotics in Children With Intestinal Failure, Central Venous Line, and Fever Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Pediatrics
Volume 140 Issue 5 Pages (up)
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage; Bacteremia/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Female; Fever/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Humans; Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Length of Stay/*trends; Male; Short Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Time-to-Treatment
Abstract BACKGROUND: Children with intestinal failure (IF) on parenteral nutrition (PN) are at high risk for bacteremia, and delays in antibiotic administration have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We designed an emergency department (ED) quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce time to administration of intravenous antibiotics in febrile children with IF on PN. METHODS: Our aim was to decrease the mean time for febrile children with IF on PN to receive intravenous antibiotics by 50% to <60 minutes over a 12-month period. Secondary outcome measures were ED, hospital, and ICU length of stay (LOS). Our process measure was the rate of ordering recommended antibiotics, and our balancing measure was the rate of hypoglycemia. Interventions included increasing provider knowledge of IF, streamlining order entry, providing individualized feedback, and standardizing the triage process. Results were analyzed by using statistical process control methodology and time series analysis. RESULTS: We identified 149 eligible ED patients, of which 62 (41.6%) had bacteremia. The mean time to antibiotics decreased after the onset of the QI initiative from 112 to 39 minutes, and the ED LOS decreased from 286 to 247 minutes, but the total length of hospital and ICU stays were unchanged. The rate of hypoglycemia was also unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Our QI intervention for febrile children with IF on PN shortened the time to receive antibiotics. Larger studies are needed to demonstrate the impact on overall LOS and mortality.
Address Division of Emergency Medicine and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-4005 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29066581 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99965
Permanent link to this record