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Author Gerceker, G.O.; Yardimci, F.; Aydinok, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized controlled trial of care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Oncology Nursing : the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society Abbreviated Journal Eur J Oncol Nurs  
  Volume 28 Issue Pages (up) 14-20  
  Keywords Adolescent; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Bacteremia/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; *Bandages; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/methods; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child; Child, Preschool; Chlorhexidine/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Patient Care Bundles; Prospective Studies; Turkey  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the care bundles including chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings on the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in pediatric hematology-oncology patients with central venous catheters (CVCs). METHOD: Twenty-seven PHO patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study in Turkey. The researcher used care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing in the experimental group (n = 14), and care bundles with advanced dressings in the control group (n = 13). RESULTS: According to the study results, 28.6% of the patients in the experimental group had CRBSI, while this rate was 38.5% in the control group patients. The CRBSI rate in the experimental group was 3.9, and the control group had 4.4 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. There was no exit-site infection in the experimental group. However, the control group had 1.7 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. CONCLUSIONS: Even though there was no difference between the two groups in which the researcher implemented care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings in terms of CRBSI development, there was reduction in the CRBSI rates thanks to the care bundle approach. It is possible to control the CRBSI rates using care bundles in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.  
  Address Ege University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Hematology-Oncology, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address: yesim.aydinok@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-3889 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28478850 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nourallah, B.; Digpal, R.; Jena, R.; Watts, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Irradiating the Subventricular Zone in Glioblastoma Patients: Is there a Case for a Clinical Trial? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Clinical Oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)) Abbreviated Journal Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages (up) 26-33  
  Keywords Adult; Brain Neoplasms/*radiotherapy; Glioblastoma/*radiotherapy; Humans; Lateral Ventricles/*radiation effects; Male; Neoplastic Stem Cells/radiation effects; Stem Cell Niche/radiation effects; Cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; neural stem cells; radiotherapy; subventricular zone  
  Abstract Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive adult brain tumour. Over the last 10 years it has emerged that the subventricular zone (SVZ), the largest adult neural stem cell niche, has an important role in the disease. Converging evidence has implicated transformation of adult neural stems in gliomagenesis and the permissive stem cell niche in disease recurrence. Concurrently, clinical studies have suggested that SVZ involvement is a negative prognostic marker. It would follow that irradiating the SVZ may improve outcomes in glioblastoma by directly targeting this putative sanctuary site. To investigate this potential strategy, 11 retrospective studies and 1 prospective study examined the relationship between dose to the SVZ and survival outcomes in glioblastoma patients. This review summarises the theoretical underpinning of this strategy, provides a critical evaluation of the existing evidence and discusses the rationale for a clinical trial.  
  Address John van Geest Centre for Repair, Cambridge, UK; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Division of Neurosurgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: cw209@cam.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0936-6555 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27729188 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96633  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Herrero, M.; Thornton, P.K.; Power, B.; Bogard, J.R.; Remans, R.; Fritz, S.; Gerber, J.S.; Nelson, G.; See, L.; Waha, K.; Watson, R.A.; West, P.C.; Samberg, L.H.; van de Steeg, J.; Stephenson, E.; van Wijk, M.; Havlik, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Planetary Health Abbreviated Journal Lancet Planet Health  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages (up) e33-e42  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Information about the global structure of agriculture and nutrient production and its diversity is essential to improve present understanding of national food production patterns, agricultural livelihoods, and food chains, and their linkages to land use and their associated ecosystems services. Here we provide a plausible breakdown of global agricultural and nutrient production by farm size, and also study the associations between farm size, agricultural diversity, and nutrient production. This analysis is crucial to design interventions that might be appropriately targeted to promote healthy diets and ecosystems in the face of population growth, urbanisation, and climate change. METHODS: We used existing spatially-explicit global datasets to estimate the production levels of 41 major crops, seven livestock, and 14 aquaculture and fish products. From overall production estimates, we estimated the production of vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, iron, zinc, calcium, calories, and protein. We also estimated the relative contribution of farms of different sizes to the production of different agricultural commodities and associated nutrients, as well as how the diversity of food production based on the number of different products grown per geographic pixel and distribution of products within this pixel (Shannon diversity index [H]) changes with different farm sizes. FINDINGS: Globally, small and medium farms (</=50 ha) produce 51-77% of nearly all commodities and nutrients examined here. However, important regional differences exist. Large farms (>50 ha) dominate production in North America, South America, and Australia and New Zealand. In these regions, large farms contribute between 75% and 100% of all cereal, livestock, and fruit production, and the pattern is similar for other commodity groups. By contrast, small farms (</=20 ha) produce more than 75% of most food commodities in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, south Asia, and China. In Europe, west Asia and north Africa, and central America, medium-size farms (20-50 ha) also contribute substantially to the production of most food commodities. Very small farms (</=2 ha) are important and have local significance in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia, where they contribute to about 30% of most food commodities. The majority of vegetables (81%), roots and tubers (72%), pulses (67%), fruits (66%), fish and livestock products (60%), and cereals (56%) are produced in diverse landscapes (H>1.5). Similarly, the majority of global micronutrients (53-81%) and protein (57%) are also produced in more diverse agricultural landscapes (H>1.5). By contrast, the majority of sugar (73%) and oil crops (57%) are produced in less diverse ones (H</=1.5), which also account for the majority of global calorie production (56%). The diversity of agricultural and nutrient production diminishes as farm size increases. However, areas of the world with higher agricultural diversity produce more nutrients, irrespective of farm size. INTERPRETATION: Our results show that farm size and diversity of agricultural production vary substantially across regions and are key structural determinants of food and nutrient production that need to be considered in plans to meet social, economic, and environmental targets. At the global level, both small and large farms have key roles in food and nutrition security. Efforts to maintain production diversity as farm sizes increase seem to be necessary to maintain the production of diverse nutrients and viable, multifunctional, sustainable landscapes. FUNDING: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health funded by the CGIAR Fund Council, Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation, European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change-Belmont Forum.  
  Address International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2542-5196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28670647 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Herrero, M.; Thornton, P.K.; Power, B.; Bogard, J.R.; Remans, R.; Fritz, S.; Gerber, J.S.; Nelson, G.; See, L.; Waha, K.; Watson, R.A.; West, P.C.; Samberg, L.H.; van de Steeg, J.; Stephenson, E.; van Wijk, M.; Havlik, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Planetary Health Abbreviated Journal Lancet Planet Health  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages (up) e33-e42  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Information about the global structure of agriculture and nutrient production and its diversity is essential to improve present understanding of national food production patterns, agricultural livelihoods, and food chains, and their linkages to land use and their associated ecosystems services. Here we provide a plausible breakdown of global agricultural and nutrient production by farm size, and also study the associations between farm size, agricultural diversity, and nutrient production. This analysis is crucial to design interventions that might be appropriately targeted to promote healthy diets and ecosystems in the face of population growth, urbanisation, and climate change. METHODS: We used existing spatially-explicit global datasets to estimate the production levels of 41 major crops, seven livestock, and 14 aquaculture and fish products. From overall production estimates, we estimated the production of vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, iron, zinc, calcium, calories, and protein. We also estimated the relative contribution of farms of different sizes to the production of different agricultural commodities and associated nutrients, as well as how the diversity of food production based on the number of different products grown per geographic pixel and distribution of products within this pixel (Shannon diversity index [H]) changes with different farm sizes. FINDINGS: Globally, small and medium farms (</=50 ha) produce 51-77% of nearly all commodities and nutrients examined here. However, important regional differences exist. Large farms (>50 ha) dominate production in North America, South America, and Australia and New Zealand. In these regions, large farms contribute between 75% and 100% of all cereal, livestock, and fruit production, and the pattern is similar for other commodity groups. By contrast, small farms (</=20 ha) produce more than 75% of most food commodities in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, south Asia, and China. In Europe, west Asia and north Africa, and central America, medium-size farms (20-50 ha) also contribute substantially to the production of most food commodities. Very small farms (</=2 ha) are important and have local significance in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia, where they contribute to about 30% of most food commodities. The majority of vegetables (81%), roots and tubers (72%), pulses (67%), fruits (66%), fish and livestock products (60%), and cereals (56%) are produced in diverse landscapes (H>1.5). Similarly, the majority of global micronutrients (53-81%) and protein (57%) are also produced in more diverse agricultural landscapes (H>1.5). By contrast, the majority of sugar (73%) and oil crops (57%) are produced in less diverse ones (H</=1.5), which also account for the majority of global calorie production (56%). The diversity of agricultural and nutrient production diminishes as farm size increases. However, areas of the world with higher agricultural diversity produce more nutrients, irrespective of farm size. INTERPRETATION: Our results show that farm size and diversity of agricultural production vary substantially across regions and are key structural determinants of food and nutrient production that need to be considered in plans to meet social, economic, and environmental targets. At the global level, both small and large farms have key roles in food and nutrition security. Efforts to maintain production diversity as farm sizes increase seem to be necessary to maintain the production of diverse nutrients and viable, multifunctional, sustainable landscapes. FUNDING: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health funded by the CGIAR Fund Council, Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation, European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change-Belmont Forum.  
  Address International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2542-5196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28670647 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98017  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jimenez, M.M.; Arias, J.; Carrasquilla, G. url  openurl
  Title Seroprevalence of dengue infection in the municipalities of Armenia, Calarca, La Tebaida and Montenegro in Quindio, 2014 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud Abbreviated Journal Biomedica  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages (up) 34-41  
  Keywords Dengue/epidemiology; immunoglobulin G; immunoglobulin M; prevalence; public health, Colombia  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Dengue is a serious public health problem in Colombia; it is prevalent in 90% of the municipalities in Quindio. Studies on its seroprevalence are required to address public health interventions. OBJECTIVE: To establish the seroprevalence of dengue infection in neighborhoods with high incidence in the municipalities of Armenia, Calarca, La Tebaida and Montenegro, Quindio, in 2014. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a probabilistic, stratified, two-stage prevalence study. We interviewed 658 residents in the urban area of the selected municipalities. After they signed the informed consent, we took a blood sample to determine dengue IgG and IgM antibodies. RESULTS: Seroprevalence of IgG in Quindio was 89,4%; in Armenia it was 88,7%, in Calarca, 81,5%, in Montenegro, 91,8% and in La Tebaida 97,8%. IgM was 14, 2% in Quindio; in Armenia it was 11,5%, in Calarca, 13,0%, in Montenegro, 13,1% and in La Tebaida, 28,9%. CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of both IgG and IgM in the four municipalities. We had positive results for IgM in all age groups, which suggests recent infection. We also found simultaneous seropositivity for IgG and IgM (12.9%), which may indicate infection by another serotype or presence of infection in the past three months. A multisectoral approach is necessary for dengue control in Quindio.  
  Address Eje de Salud Publica, Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogota, Bogota, D.C., Colombia. monica.jimenez@fsfb.org.co  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0120-4157 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28527246 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97637  
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