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Author Kane, S.P.; Hanes, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Unexplained increases in serum vancomycin concentration in a morbidly obese patient Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Intensive & Critical Care Nursing Abbreviated Journal Intensive Crit Care Nurs  
  Volume 39 Issue Pages (up) 55-58  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Cross Reactions/physiology; Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Middle Aged; Obesity, Morbid/*drug therapy/physiopathology; Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/drug therapy/prevention & control; Vancomycin/*administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Central venous catheters; Critical care; Drug monitoring; Infectious disease; Medication safety; Vancomycin  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: To report a case of increases in vancomycin concentrations without additional vancomycin doses being given. CASE STUDY: A 64 year-old morbidly obese female received three total doses of vancomycin for surgical prophylaxis and for ventilator-associated pneumonia. Subsequent vancomycin concentrations from the patient's central venous catheter (CVC) demonstrated increasing drug levels from 27.1 to 45.9mcg/mL despite no additional vancomycin being given and proper line flushing prior to sample collection. There is no clear explanation for the increase in the patient's vancomycin concentration. Drug leaching from the CVC, enterohepatic recycling, drug redistribution from adipose or other tissues, and assay cross-reactivity with other medications are all potential explanations for the increased vancomycin concentrations. CONCLUSION: This case report describes an unexplained increase in vancomycin concentrations and reinforces both the fallibility of laboratory testing and that unusual circumstances do occur. Several potential causes are hypothesised with CVC drug leaching being the most likely. Nurses and other healthcare providers with similar scenarios should consider a peripheral blood sample to rule out the potential for CVC drug leaching as a possible explanation.  
  Address Department of Pharmacy Practice, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: scott.hanes@rosalindfranklin.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0964-3397 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27899248 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100001  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lacovich, V.; Espindola, S.L.; Alloatti, M.; Pozo Devoto, V.; Cromberg, L.E.; Carna, M.E.; Forte, G.; Gallo, J.-M.; Bruno, L.; Stokin, G.B.; Avale, M.E.; Falzone, T.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tau Isoforms Imbalance Impairs the Axonal Transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Human Neurons Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal J Neurosci  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages (up) 58-69  
  Keywords App; Alzheimer's; axonal transport; splicing; tau; tauopathies  
  Abstract Tau, as a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of MT dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) MT binding repeats. Although tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here, we addressed this issue using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content, neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectory analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Conversely, the imbalance toward the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoform imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The tau protein has a relevant role in the transport of cargos throughout neurons. Dysfunction in tau metabolism underlies several neurological disorders leading to dementia. In the adult human brain, two tau isoforms are found in equal amounts, whereas changes in such equilibrium have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the role of tau in human neurons in culture and found that perturbations in the endogenous balance of tau isoforms were sufficient to impair the transport of the Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP), although neuronal morphology was normal. Our results provide evidence of a direct relationship between tau isoform imbalance and defects in axonal transport, which induce an abnormal APP metabolism with important implications in neurodegeneration.  
  Address Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires C1428ADN, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0270-6474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28053030 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Morais Sato, P.; Unsain, R.F.; Gittelsohn, J.; Sanches Tavares da Silva, J.G.; Goncalves Perez, I.C.; Baeza Scagliusi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Strategies used by overweight and obese low-income mothers to feed their families in urban Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 111 Issue Pages (up) 63-70  
  Keywords Brazil; Food insecurity; Low-income; Obesity; Overweight; Women  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare strategies adopted by overweight and obese low-income mothers living in different vulnerable contexts to deal with food constraints and feed their families. DESIGN: Qualitative in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed with exploratory content analysis and the number of segments per theme was used to compare neighborhoods. SETTING: Three low-income neighborhoods in Santos, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: A purposive sample of 21 overweight or obese mothers. RESULTS: We identified three main types of strategies, namely, food acquisition, cooking, and eating. Food acquisition included social support and food-sourcing strategies. Social support strategies ranged from macro (governmental programs) to micro (family) levels. Food-sourcing strategies involved price research and use of credit to buy foods. Cooking approaches included optimizing food (e.g., adding water to beans), avoiding wastefulness, and substitutions (e.g., using water instead of milk when making cakes). Eating themes ranged from lack of quantity to lack of quality. Strategies to deal with the lack of food were affected by family dynamics, such as prioritizing provision of fruits to children. Food choices (e.g., low consumption of fruits and high consumption of fatty meats) derived from strategies may help promote overweight and obesity. Furthermore, for participants, financial constraints were perceived as barriers to following nutritionists' recommendations and weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the barriers that low-income women face in adopting a healthy diet and sheds light on the importance of the symbolic value of food, even in the context of food insecurity. Finally, it suggests that environmental aspects could increase the accessibility to fruits and vegetables. These findings could be used to inform the planning and implementation of interventions.  
  Address Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 715 – Sao Paulo/SP – CEP 01255-000, Sao Paulo/SP, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28034737 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97449  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Morais Sato, P.; Unsain, R.F.; Gittelsohn, J.; Sanches Tavares da Silva, J.G.; Goncalves Perez, I.C.; Baeza Scagliusi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Strategies used by overweight and obese low-income mothers to feed their families in urban Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 111 Issue Pages (up) 63-70  
  Keywords Brazil; Food insecurity; Low-income; Obesity; Overweight; Women  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare strategies adopted by overweight and obese low-income mothers living in different vulnerable contexts to deal with food constraints and feed their families. DESIGN: Qualitative in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed with exploratory content analysis and the number of segments per theme was used to compare neighborhoods. SETTING: Three low-income neighborhoods in Santos, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: A purposive sample of 21 overweight or obese mothers. RESULTS: We identified three main types of strategies, namely, food acquisition, cooking, and eating. Food acquisition included social support and food-sourcing strategies. Social support strategies ranged from macro (governmental programs) to micro (family) levels. Food-sourcing strategies involved price research and use of credit to buy foods. Cooking approaches included optimizing food (e.g., adding water to beans), avoiding wastefulness, and substitutions (e.g., using water instead of milk when making cakes). Eating themes ranged from lack of quantity to lack of quality. Strategies to deal with the lack of food were affected by family dynamics, such as prioritizing provision of fruits to children. Food choices (e.g., low consumption of fruits and high consumption of fatty meats) derived from strategies may help promote overweight and obesity. Furthermore, for participants, financial constraints were perceived as barriers to following nutritionists' recommendations and weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the barriers that low-income women face in adopting a healthy diet and sheds light on the importance of the symbolic value of food, even in the context of food insecurity. Finally, it suggests that environmental aspects could increase the accessibility to fruits and vegetables. These findings could be used to inform the planning and implementation of interventions.  
  Address Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 715 – Sao Paulo/SP – CEP 01255-000, Sao Paulo/SP, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28034737 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98033  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Goffart, N.; Lombard, A.; Lallemand, F.; Kroonen, J.; Nassen, J.; Di Valentin, E.; Berendsen, S.; Dedobbeleer, M.; Willems, E.; Robe, P.; Bours, V.; Martin, D.; Martinive, P.; Maquet, P.; Rogister, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CXCL12 mediates glioblastoma resistance to radiotherapy in the subventricular zone Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages (up) 66-77  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Neoplasms/metabolism/*pathology/radiotherapy; Chemokine CXCL12/*metabolism; Cranial Irradiation/*adverse effects; Gamma Rays/adverse effects; Glioblastoma/metabolism/*pathology/radiotherapy; Humans; Lateral Ventricles/metabolism/*pathology/radiation effects; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology/radiation effects; *Radiation Tolerance; Signal Transduction/radiation effects; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Cxcl12; glioblastoma; mesenchymal activation; radioresistance; subventricular zone  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months despite multimodal therapy. These catastrophic survival rates are to be correlated to systematic relapses that might arise from remaining glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) left behind after surgery. In this line, it has recently been demonstrated that GSCs are able to escape the tumor mass and preferentially colonize the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). At a distance from the initial tumor site, these GSCs might therefore represent a high-quality model of clinical resilience to therapy and cancer relapses as they specifically retain tumor-initiating abilities. METHOD: While relying on recent findings that have validated the existence of GSCs in the human SVZ, we questioned the role of the SVZ niche as a potential GSC reservoir involved in therapeutic failure. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that (i) GSCs located in the SVZ are specifically resistant to radiation in vivo, (ii) these cells display enhanced mesenchymal roots that are known to be associated with cancer radioresistance, (iii) these mesenchymal traits are specifically upregulated by CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1) both in vitro and in the SVZ environment, (iv) the amount of SVZ-released CXCL12 mediates GBM resistance to radiation in vitro, and (v) interferes with the CXCL12/CXCR4 signalling system, allowing weakening of the tumor mesenchymal roots and radiosensitizing SVZ-nested GBM cells. CONCLUSION: Together, these data provide evidence on how the adult SVZ environment, through the release of CXCL12, supports GBM therapeutic failure and potential tumor relapse.  
  Address Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (N.G., A.L., J.N., M.D., E.W., B.R.); Department of Neurosurgery, CHU and University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (A.L., D.M.); Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, CHU and University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (F.L., P.M.); Laboratory of Tumor and Development Biology, GIGA-Cancer Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (F.L.); Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (F.L.); Human Genetics, CHU and University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (N.G., J.K., V.B.); Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences and the T&P Bohnenn Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands (N.G., J.K., S.B., P.R.); GIGA-Viral Vector Plateform, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (E.D.V.); Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (P.M., B.R.)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27370398 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96647  
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