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Author Lee, J.W.; Lim, D.H.; Sung, K.W.; Lee, H.J.; Yi, E.S.; Yoo, K.H.; Koo, H.H.; Suh, Y.L.; Shin, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for High-Grade Gliomas in Children and Adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages (up) 195-203  
  Keywords Adolescent; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*therapeutic use; Brain Neoplasms/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Carboplatin/administration & dosage; Child; Child, Preschool; Etoposide/administration & dosage; Female; Glioma/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Humans; Male; Neoplasm Grading; Remission Induction; Retrospective Studies; Stem Cell Transplantation; Survival Rate; Thiotepa/administration & dosage; Transplantation, Autologous; Treatment Outcome; *Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation; *Brain Tumor; *Children; *High-dose Chemotherapy; *High-grade Glioma  
  Abstract With the aim to investigate the outcome of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) for high-grade gliomas (HGGs), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with HGGs (16 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 7 other HGGs) between 2006 and 2015. Gross or near total resection was possible in 11 patients. Front-line treatment after surgery was radiotherapy (RT) in 14 patients and chemotherapy in the remaining 16 patients including 3 patients less than 3 years of age. Eight of 12 patients who remained progression free and 5 of the remaining 18 patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent the first HDCT/auto-SCT with carboplatin + thiotepa + etoposide (CTE) regimen and 11 of them proceeded to the second HDCT/auto-SCT with cyclophosphamide + melphalan (CyM) regimen. One patient died from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) during the second HDCT/auto-SCT; otherwise, toxicities were manageable. Four patients in complete response (CR) and 3 of 7 patients in partial response (PR) or second PR at the first HDCT/auto-SCT remained event free: however, 2 patients with progressive tumor experienced progression again. The probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) after the first HDCT/auto-SCT in 11 patients in CR, PR, or second PR was 58.2% +/- 16.9%. Tumor status at the first HDCT/auto-SCT was the only significant factor for outcome after HDCT/auto-SCT. There was no difference in survival between glioblastoma and other HGGs. This study suggests that the outcome of HGGs in children and adolescents after HDCT/auto-SCT is encouraging if the patient could achieve CR or PR before HDCT/auto-SCT.  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. shinhj@skku.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28049229 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96614  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages (up) 201-204  
  Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors  
  Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.  
  Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97187  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages (up) 201-204  
  Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors  
  Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.  
  Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hu, B.; Emdad, L.; Kegelman, T.P.; Shen, X.-N.; Das, S.K.; Sarkar, D.; Fisher, P.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Regulates beta-Catenin Signaling to Maintain Glioma Stem-like Stemness and Self-Renewal Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Molecular Cancer Research : MCR Abbreviated Journal Mol Cancer Res  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages (up) 225-233  
  Keywords Brain Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Glioblastoma/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*pathology; Signal Transduction; Tumor Cells, Cultured; beta Catenin/genetics/*metabolism  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme is a common malignant brain tumor that portends extremely poor patient survival. Recent studies reveal that glioma stem-like cells (GSC) are responsible for glioblastoma multiforme escape from chemo-radiotherapy and mediators of tumor relapse. Previous studies suggest that AEG-1 (MTDH), an oncogene upregulated in most types of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme, plays a focal role linking multiple signaling pathways in tumorigenesis. We now report a crucial role of AEG-1 in glioma stem cell biology. Primary glioblastoma multiforme cells were isolated from tumor specimens and cultured as neurospheres. Using the surface marker CD133, negative and positive cells were separated as nonstem and stem populations by cell sorting. Tissue samples and low passage cells were characterized and compared with normal controls. Functional biological assays were performed to measure stemness, self-renewal, differentiation, adhesion, protein-protein interactions, and cell signaling. AEG-1 was upregulated in all glioblastoma multiforme neurospheres compared with normal neural stem cells. Expression of AEG-1 was strongly associated with stem cell markers CD133 and SOX2. AEG-1 facilitated beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus by forming a complex with LEF1 and beta-catenin, subsequently activating Wnt signaling downstream genes. Through an AEG-1/Akt/GSK3beta signaling axis, AEG-1 controlled phosphorylation levels of beta-catenin that stabilized the protein. IMPLICATIONS: This study discovers a previously unrecognized role of AEG-1 in GSC biology and supports the significance of this gene as a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma multiforme. Mol Cancer Res; 15(2); 225-33. (c)2016 AACR.  
  Address VCU Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1541-7786 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27903708 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96619  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Spencer, D.A.; Auffinger, B.M.; Murphy, J.P.; Muroski, M.E.; Qiao, J.; Gorind, Y.; Lesniak, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Hitting a Moving Target: Glioma Stem Cells Demand New Approaches in Glioblastoma Therapy Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Current Cancer Drug Targets Abbreviated Journal Curr Cancer Drug Targets  
  Volume 17 Issue 3 Pages (up) 236-254  
  Keywords Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy/pathology; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects; Glioblastoma/*drug therapy/pathology; Glioma/drug therapy/*pathology; Humans; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/*pathology/radiation effects; Chemotherapy; drug targets; glioblastoma multiforme; glioma stem cells; niches; recurrence; resistance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to devastate patients and outfox investigators and clinicians despite the preponderance of research directed at its biology, pathogenesis and therapeutic advances. GBM routinely outlasts multidisciplinary treatment protocols, almost inevitably recurring in a yet more aggressive and resistant form with distinct genetic differences from the original tumor. Attempts to glean further insight into GBM point increasingly toward a subpopulation of cells with a stem-like phenotype. These cancer stem cells, similar to those now described in a variety of malignancies, are capable of tumorigenesis from a population of susceptible cells. CONCLUSIONS: Glioma stem cells have thus become a prevalent focus in GBM research for their presumed role in development, maintenance and recurrence of tumors. Glioma stem cells infiltrate the white matter surrounding tumors and often evade resection. They are uniquely suited both biochemically and environmentally to resist the best therapy currently available, intrinsically and efficiently resistant to standard chemo- and radiotherapy. These stem cells create an extremely heterogenous tumor that to date has had an answer for every therapeutic question, with continued dismal patient survival. Targeting this population of glioma stem cells may hold the long-awaited key to durable therapeutic efficacy in GBM.  
  Address Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, Northwestern University, 676 N. St. Clair Street, Suite 2210, Chicago, IL60611, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1568-0096 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27993114 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96616  
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