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Author Souza, R.L.; Mugabe, V.A.; Paploski, I.A.D.; Rodrigues, M.S.; Moreira, P.S.D.S.; Nascimento, L.C.J.; Roundy, C.M.; Weaver, S.C.; Reis, M.G.; Kitron, U.; Ribeiro, G.S.
Title Effect of an intervention in storm drains to prevent Aedes aegypti reproduction in Salvador, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Parasites & Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 328
Keywords Aedes aegypti; Arboviruses; Catch basin; Disease vectors; Entomology; Epidemiology; Insect vectors; Mosquitoes; Storm drain
Abstract BACKGROUND: Aedes aegypti, the principal vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses, is a synanthropic species that uses stagnant water to complete its reproductive cycle. In urban settings, rainfall water draining structures, such as storm drains, may retain water and serve as a larval development site for Aedes spp. reproduction. Herein, we describe the effect of a community-based intervention on preventing standing water accumulation in storm drains and their consequent infestation by adult and immature Ae. aegypti and other mosquitoes. METHODS: Between April and May of 2016, local residents association of Salvador, Brazil, after being informed of water accumulation and Ae. aegypti infestation in the storm drains in their area, performed an intervention on 52 storm drains. The intervention consisted of placing concrete at the bottom of the storm drains to elevate their base to the level of the outflow tube, avoiding water accumulation, and placement of a metal mesh covering the outflow tube to avoid its clogging with debris. To determine the impact of the intervention, we compared the frequency at which the 52 storm drains contained water, as well as adult and immature mosquitoes using data from two surveys performed before and two surveys performed after the intervention. RESULTS: During the pre-intervention period, water accumulated in 48 (92.3%) of the storm drains, and immature Ae. aegypti were found in 11 (21.2%) and adults in 10 (19.2%). After the intervention, water accumulated in 5 (9.6%) of the storm drains (P < 0.001), none (0.0%) had immatures (P < 0.001), and 3 (5.8%) contained adults (P = 0.039). The total number of Ae. aegypti immatures collected decreased from 109 to 0 (P < 0.001) and adults decreased from 37 to 8 (P = 0.011) after the intervention. Collection of immature and adult non-Aedes mosquitoes (mainly Culex spp.) in the storm drains also decreased after the intervention. CONCLUSION: This study exemplifies how a simple intervention targeting storm drains can result in a major reduction of water retention, and, consequently, impact Ae. aegypti larval populations. Larger and multi-center evaluations are needed to confirm the potential of citywide structural modifications of storm drains to reduce Aedes spp. infestation level.
Address Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. guilherme.ribeiro@bahia.fiocruz.br
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 1756-3305 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28697811 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97633
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Author Celiku, O.; Tandle, A.; Chung, J.-Y.; Hewitt, S.M.; Camphausen, K.; Shankavaram, U.
Title Computational analysis of the mesenchymal signature landscape in gliomas Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Medical Genomics Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Genomics
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 13
Keywords Cd44; Computational modeling; Epithelial to mesenchymal transition; Glioma
Abstract BACKGROUND: Epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and mimicking processes, contribute to cancer invasion and metastasis, and are known to be responsible for resistance to various therapeutic agents in many cancers. While a number of studies have proposed molecular signatures that characterize the spectrum of such transition, more work is needed to understand how the mesenchymal signature (MS) is regulated in non-epithelial cancers like gliomas, to identify markers with the most prognostic significance, and potential for therapeutic targeting. RESULTS: Computational analysis of 275 glioma samples from “The Cancer Genome Atlas” was used to identify the regulatory changes between low grade gliomas with little expression of MS, and high grade glioblastomas with high expression of MS. TF (transcription factor)-gene regulatory networks were constructed for each of the cohorts, and 5 major pathways and 118 transcription factors were identified as involved in the differential regulation of the networks. The most significant pathway – Extracellular matrix organization – was further analyzed for prognostic relevance. A 20-gene signature was identified as having prognostic significance (HR (hazard ratio) 3.2, 95% CI (confidence interval) = 1.53-8.33), after controlling for known prognostic factors (age, and glioma grade). The signature's significance was validated in an independent data set. The putative stem cell marker CD44 was biologically validated in glioma cell lines and brain tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the differences between low grade gliomas and high grade glioblastoma are associated with differential expression of the signature genes, raising the possibility that targeting these genes might prolong survival in glioma patients.
Address Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 10 Center Drive, Bldg. 10, Rm. B3B70, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. uma@mail.nih.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 1755-8794 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28279210 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96602
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Author Khalifa, J.; Tensaouti, F.; Lusque, A.; Plas, B.; Lotterie, J.-A.; Benouaich-Amiel, A.; Uro-Coste, E.; Lubrano, V.; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, E.
Title Subventricular zones: new key targets for glioblastoma treatment Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Radiation Oncology (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Radiat Oncol
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 67
Keywords Glioblastoma; Prognostic factors; Radiotherapy; Stem-cell niche; Subventricular Zone
Abstract BACKGROUND: We aimed to identify subventricular zone (SVZ)-related prognostic factors of survival and patterns of recurrence among patients with glioblastoma. METHODS: Forty-three patients with primary diagnosed glioblastoma treated in our Cancer Center between 2006 and 2010 were identified. All patients received surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. Ipsilateral (iSVZ), contralateral (cSVZ) and bilateral (bSVZ) SVZs were retrospectively segmented and radiation dose-volume histograms were generated. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model was assessed to examine the relationship between prognostic factors and time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Median age was 59 years (range: 25-85). Median follow-up, OS and TTP were 22.7 months (range 7.5-69.7 months), 22.7 months (95% CI 14.5-26.2 months) and 6.4 months (95% CI 4.4-9.3 months), respectively. On univariate analysis, initial contact to SVZ was a poor prognostic factor for OS (18.7 vs 41.7 months, p = 0.014) and TTP (4.6 vs 12.9 months, p = 0.002). Patients whose bSVZ volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20Gy) was greater than 84% had a significantly improved TTP (17.7 months vs 5.2 months, p = 0.017). This radiation dose coverage was compatible with an hippocampal sparing. On multivariate analysis, initial contact to SVZ and V20 Gy to bSVZ lesser than 84% remained poor prognostic factors for TTP (HR = 3.07, p = 0.012 and HR = 2.67, p = 0.047, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that contact to SVZ, as well as insufficient bSVZ radiation dose coverage (V20Gy <84%), might be independent poor prognostic factors for TTP. Therefore, targeting SVZ could be of crucial interest for optimizing glioblastoma treatment.
Address INSERM U1037, Centre de Recherche contre le Cancer de Toulouse, 1 avenue Irene Joliot-Curie, Toulouse Cedex, 31059, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 1748-717X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28424082 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96593
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Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97187
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655
Permanent link to this record