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Author Goetz, L.G.; Valeggia, C.
Title The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Human Biology : the Official Journal of the Human Biology Council Abbreviated Journal Am J Hum Biol
Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords
Abstract OBJECTIVES: The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. METHODS: We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. RESULTS: The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet.
Address Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 05611
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1042-0533 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28101997 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98030
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Author Li, M.; Zhao, H.; Ananiev, G.E.; Musser, M.T.; Ness, K.H.; Maglaque, D.L.; Saha, K.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Zhao, X.
Title Establishment of Reporter Lines for Detecting Fragile X Mental Retardation (FMR1) Gene Reactivation in Human Neural Cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio) Abbreviated Journal Stem Cells
Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 158-169
Keywords Drug discovery; Fmr1; Fmrp; Fragile X syndrome; High throughput; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Luciferase
Abstract Human patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide unique opportunities for disease modeling and drug development. However, adapting hiPSCs or their differentiated progenies to high throughput assays for phenotyping or drug screening has been challenging. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and a major genetic cause of autism. FXS is caused by mutational trinucleotide expansion in the FMR1 gene leading to hypermethylation and gene silencing. One potential therapeutic strategy is to reactivate the silenced FMR1 gene, which has been attempted using both candidate chemicals and cell-based screening. However, molecules that effectively reactivate the silenced FMR1 gene are yet to be identified; therefore, a high throughput unbiased screen is needed. Here we demonstrate the creation of a robust FMR1-Nluc reporter hiPSC line by knocking in a Nano luciferase (Nluc) gene into the endogenous human FMR1 gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing method. We confirmed that luciferase activities faithfully report FMR1 gene expression levels and showed that neural progenitor cells derived from this line could be optimized for high throughput screening. The FMR1-Nluc reporter line is a good resource for drug screening as well as for testing potential genetic reactivation strategies. In addition, our data provide valuable information for the generation of knockin human iPSC reporter lines for disease modeling, drug screening, and mechanistic studies. Stem Cells 2017;35:158-169.
Address Department of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1066-5099 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27422057 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95937
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Author Yu, W.-L.; Lee, M.-F.; Chen, C.-C.; Tang, H.-J.; Ho, C.-H.; Chuang, Y.-C.
Title Impacts of Hypervirulence Determinants on Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Microb Drug Resist
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 376-383
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology; Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Cross Infection/drug therapy/microbiology; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*genetics; Male; Middle Aged; Serogroup; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Virulence Factors/*genetics; beta-Lactamases/*genetics; Esbl; Klebsiella pneumoniae; hypermucoviscosity; hypervirulence; rmpA; virulence
Abstract We investigated the implications of hypervirulence determinants on clinical features of 48 adult patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates in the hypervirulence group included any of the following virulence determinants: K1/K2 capsule serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, rmpA gene, or rmpA2 gene. Nonhypervirulence group isolates were negative for all of the above virulence factors. In this study, all isolates used were non-K1/K2 strains. Statistically significant differences were observed in clinical features of patients between the two groups. The hypervirulent isolates (n = 19), including 11 isolates with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, 15 with the rmpA gene, and 16 with the rmpA2 gene, were more commonly recovered from diabetic patients and mainly manifested as secondary bacteremia (such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, or other localized infections). The nonhypervirulent isolates (n = 29) were more commonly recovered from patients after prolonged hospital stays (>30 days) and mostly manifested as primary bacteremia. The overall in-hospital mortality was 56.3%. Hazard ratio (HR) analysis revealed the following positive predictors for mortality: nosocomial infection, stay in an intensive care unit, no removal of the central venous catheter, Charlson comorbidity score, and APACHE II score (>==15). The negative predictors were initial appropriate antibiotic therapy (HR 0.42) and urinary tract infection (HR 0.19). Charlson score was an independent confounder based on multivariate analysis (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.99). In conclusion, hypervirulence determinants played a role in causing secondary infections in diabetic patients; however, the presence of morbidity cofactors could themselves influence mortality, despite the absence of hypervirulence determinants.
Address 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center-Liou Ying , Tainan City, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1076-6294 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27380450 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99505
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, W.-L.; Lee, M.-F.; Chen, C.-C.; Tang, H.-J.; Ho, C.-H.; Chuang, Y.-C.
Title Impacts of Hypervirulence Determinants on Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Microb Drug Resist
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 376-383
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology; Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Cross Infection/drug therapy/microbiology; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*genetics; Male; Middle Aged; Serogroup; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Virulence Factors/*genetics; beta-Lactamases/*genetics; Esbl; Klebsiella pneumoniae; hypermucoviscosity; hypervirulence; rmpA; virulence
Abstract We investigated the implications of hypervirulence determinants on clinical features of 48 adult patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates in the hypervirulence group included any of the following virulence determinants: K1/K2 capsule serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, rmpA gene, or rmpA2 gene. Nonhypervirulence group isolates were negative for all of the above virulence factors. In this study, all isolates used were non-K1/K2 strains. Statistically significant differences were observed in clinical features of patients between the two groups. The hypervirulent isolates (n = 19), including 11 isolates with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, 15 with the rmpA gene, and 16 with the rmpA2 gene, were more commonly recovered from diabetic patients and mainly manifested as secondary bacteremia (such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, or other localized infections). The nonhypervirulent isolates (n = 29) were more commonly recovered from patients after prolonged hospital stays (>30 days) and mostly manifested as primary bacteremia. The overall in-hospital mortality was 56.3%. Hazard ratio (HR) analysis revealed the following positive predictors for mortality: nosocomial infection, stay in an intensive care unit, no removal of the central venous catheter, Charlson comorbidity score, and APACHE II score (>==15). The negative predictors were initial appropriate antibiotic therapy (HR 0.42) and urinary tract infection (HR 0.19). Charlson score was an independent confounder based on multivariate analysis (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.99). In conclusion, hypervirulence determinants played a role in causing secondary infections in diabetic patients; however, the presence of morbidity cofactors could themselves influence mortality, despite the absence of hypervirulence determinants.
Address 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center-Liou Ying , Tainan City, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1076-6294 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27380450 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100535
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Author Tahara, T.; Hirata, I.; Nakano, N.; Nagasaka, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ohmiya, N.
Title Comprehensive DNA Methylation Profiling of Inflammatory Mucosa in Ulcerative Colitis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Abbreviated Journal Inflamm Bowel Dis
Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 165-173
Keywords
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Aberrant DNA methylation frequently occurs in the inflammatory mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) and is involved in UC-related tumorigenesis. We performed comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of the promoter regions of the inflamed rectal mucosae of patients with UC. DESIGN: The methylation status of the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 45 cancer/inflammation or age-related candidate genes and the LINE1 repetitive element were examined in the colonic mucosae of 84 cancer-free patients with UC by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Methylation status of selected genes (DPYS, N33, MIR1247, GSTP1, and SOX11) was also determined in 14 neoplastic lesions (5 with high-grade dysplasia and 9 with carcinoma) and 8 adjacent tissues derived from 12 patients. An Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array was used to characterize the methylation status of >450,000 CpG sites for 10 patients with UC. RESULTS: Clustering analysis based on the methylation status of the candidate genes clearly distinguished the inflammatory samples from the noninflammatory samples. The hypermethylation of the promoter CGIs strongly correlated with increased disease duration, which is a known risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Genome-wide methylation analyses revealed a high rate of hypermethylation in the severe phenotype of UC, particularly at the CGIs. Exclusively hypermethylated promoter CGIs in the severe phenotypes were significantly related to genes involved in biosynthetic processes, the regulation of metabolic processes, and nitrogen compound metabolic processes. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest the potential utility of DNA methylation as a molecular marker and therapeutic target for UC-related tumorigenesis.
Address *Department of Gastroenterology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan; and daggerDepartment of Gastroenterology, Tanimukai Hospital Japan, Nishinomiya, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1078-0998 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27930411 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96375
Permanent link to this record