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Author Kim, M.Y.; Park, S.-J.; Shim, J.W.; Song, Y.J.; Yang, K.; Park, S.-J.; Heo, K.
Title Accumulation of low-dose BIX01294 promotes metastatic potential of U251 glioblastoma cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Oncology Letters Abbreviated Journal Oncol Lett
Volume 13 Issue (down) 3 Pages 1767-1774
Keywords Bix01294; epithelial-mesenchymal transition; glioblastoma stem cells; metastasis
Abstract BIX01294 (Bix) is known to be a euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2 inhibitor and treatment with Bix suppresses cancer cell survival and proliferation. In the present study, it was observed that sequential treatment with low-dose Bix notably increases glioblastoma cell migration and metastasis. It was demonstrated that U251 cells sequentially treated with low-dose Bix exhibited induced characteristic changes in critical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, beta-catenin and zinc finger protein SNAI2. Notably, sequential treatment with Bix also increased the expression of cancer stem cell-associated markers, including sex determining region Y-box 2, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 and cluster of differentiation 133. Neurosphere formation was significantly enhanced in cells sequentially treated with Bix, compared with control cells (control: P=0.011; single treatment of Bix, P=0.045). The results of the present study suggest that accumulation of low-dose Bix enhanced the migration and metastatic potential of glioblastoma cells by regulating EMT-associated gene expression, which may be the cause of the altered properties of glioblastoma stem cells.
Address Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (DIRAMS), Busan 619-953, Republic of Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1792-1074 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28454322 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96588
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Author Azoulay, M.; Santos, F.; Shenouda, G.; Petrecca, K.; Oweida, A.; Guiot, M.C.; Owen, S.; Panet-Raymond, V.; Souhami, L.; Abdulkarim, B.S.
Title Benefit of re-operation and salvage therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: results from a single institution Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol
Volume 132 Issue (down) 3 Pages 419-426
Keywords Bevacizumab; Glioblastoma; Radiation; Recurrence; Surgery; Temozolomide
Abstract The optimal management of recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) has yet to be determined. We aim to assess the benefits of re-operation and salvage therapies (chemotherapy and/or re-irradiation) for recurrent GBM and to identify prognostic factors associated with better survival. All patients who underwent surgery for GBM between January 2005 and December 2012 followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and who developed GBM recurrence on imaging were included in this retrospective study. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox models in order to identify factors associated with overall survival (OS). One hundred and eighty patients treated to a dose of 60 Gy were diagnosed with recurrent GBM. At a median follow-up time of 6.2 months, the median survival (MS) from time of recurrence was 6.6 months. Sixty-nine patients underwent repeat surgery for recurrence based on imaging. To establish the benefits of repeat surgery and salvage therapies, 68 patients who underwent repeat surgery were matched to patients who did not based on extent of initial resection and presence of subventricular zone involvement at recurrence. MS for patients who underwent re-operation was 9.6 months, compared to 5.3 months for patients who did not have repeat surgery (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis in the matched pairs confirmed that repeat surgery with the addition of other salvage treatment can significantly affect patient outcome (HR 0.53). Re-operation with additional salvage therapies for recurrent GBM provides survival prolongation at the time of progression.
Address Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Cancer Centre, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada. bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28374095 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96599
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Author Bischof, J.; Westhoff, M.-A.; Wagner, J.E.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Trentmann, S.; Knippschild, U.; Wirtz, C.R.; Burster, T.
Title Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol
Volume 39 Issue (down) 3 Pages 1010428317692227
Keywords Animals; Autophagy; Brain Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology; Cathepsins/*metabolism; Glioblastoma/*metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/*pathology; Proteolysis; *Major histocompatibility complex class I; *autophagy; *cathepsin; *glioblastoma
Abstract One major obstacle in cancer therapy is chemoresistance leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Cancer stem cells, in particular glioblastoma stem cells, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and immune recognition. In case of immune recognition, several survival mechanisms including, regulation of autophagy, proteases, and cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, are found in glioblastoma stem cells. In different pathways, cathepsins play a crucial role in processing functional proteins that are necessary for several processes and proper cell function. Consequently, strategies targeting these pathways in glioblastoma stem cells are promising approaches to interfere with tumor cell survival and will be discussed in this review.
Address 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Surgery Center, Ulm University Medical Center, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28347245 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96600
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Author Hira, V.V.V.; Verbovsek, U.; Breznik, B.; Srdic, M.; Novinec, M.; Kakar, H.; Wormer, J.; der Swaan, B.V.; Lenarcic, B.; Juliano, L.; Mehta, S.; Van Noorden, C.J.F.; Lah, T.T.
Title Cathepsin K cleavage of SDF-1alpha inhibits its chemotactic activity towards glioblastoma stem-like cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta
Volume 1864 Issue (down) 3 Pages 594-603
Keywords Amino Acid Sequence; Cathepsin K/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemokine CXCL12/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism; Chemotaxis; Gene Expression; Heterocyclic Compounds/pharmacology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/pathology; Neuroglia/*metabolism/pathology; Protein Binding; Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical; Protein Conformation, beta-Strand; Proteolysis; Receptors, CXCR/genetics/metabolism; Receptors, CXCR4/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism; Stem Cell Niche/genetics; *Cathepsin K; *Glioma stem-like cells; *Niche; *Stromal-derived factor-1alpha
Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with poor patient survival that is at least partly caused by malignant and therapy-resistant glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) that are protected in GSLC niches. Previously, we have shown that the chemo-attractant stromal-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha), its C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and the cysteine protease cathepsin K (CatK) are localized in GSLC niches in glioblastoma. Here, we investigated whether SDF-1alpha is a niche factor that through its interactions with CXCR4 and/or its second receptor CXCR7 on GSLCs facilitates their homing to niches. Furthermore, we aimed to prove that SDF-1alpha cleavage by CatK inactivates SDF-1alpha and inhibits the invasion of GSLCs. We performed mass spectrometric analysis of cleavage products of SDF-1alpha after proteolysis by CatK. We demonstrated that CatK cleaves SDF-1alpha at 3 sites in the N-terminus, which is the region of SDF-1alpha that binds to its receptors. Confocal imaging of human GBM tissue sections confirmed co-localization of SDF-1alpha and CatK in GSLC niches. In accordance, 2D and 3D invasion experiments using CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs and GBM cells showed that SDF-1alpha had chemotactic activity whereas CatK cleavage products of SDF-1alpha did not. Besides, CXCR4 inhibitor plerixafor inhibited invasion of CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs. In conclusion, CatK can cleave and inactivate SDF-1alpha. This implies that CatK activity facilitates migration of GSLCs out of niches. We propose that activation of CatK may be a promising strategy to prevent homing of GSLCs in niches and thus render these cells sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation.
Address Department of Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, National Institute of Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 113, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3002 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28040478 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96615
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Author Spencer, D.A.; Auffinger, B.M.; Murphy, J.P.; Muroski, M.E.; Qiao, J.; Gorind, Y.; Lesniak, M.S.
Title Hitting a Moving Target: Glioma Stem Cells Demand New Approaches in Glioblastoma Therapy Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Current Cancer Drug Targets Abbreviated Journal Curr Cancer Drug Targets
Volume 17 Issue (down) 3 Pages 236-254
Keywords Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy/pathology; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects; Glioblastoma/*drug therapy/pathology; Glioma/drug therapy/*pathology; Humans; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/*pathology/radiation effects; Chemotherapy; drug targets; glioblastoma multiforme; glioma stem cells; niches; recurrence; resistance
Abstract BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to devastate patients and outfox investigators and clinicians despite the preponderance of research directed at its biology, pathogenesis and therapeutic advances. GBM routinely outlasts multidisciplinary treatment protocols, almost inevitably recurring in a yet more aggressive and resistant form with distinct genetic differences from the original tumor. Attempts to glean further insight into GBM point increasingly toward a subpopulation of cells with a stem-like phenotype. These cancer stem cells, similar to those now described in a variety of malignancies, are capable of tumorigenesis from a population of susceptible cells. CONCLUSIONS: Glioma stem cells have thus become a prevalent focus in GBM research for their presumed role in development, maintenance and recurrence of tumors. Glioma stem cells infiltrate the white matter surrounding tumors and often evade resection. They are uniquely suited both biochemically and environmentally to resist the best therapy currently available, intrinsically and efficiently resistant to standard chemo- and radiotherapy. These stem cells create an extremely heterogenous tumor that to date has had an answer for every therapeutic question, with continued dismal patient survival. Targeting this population of glioma stem cells may hold the long-awaited key to durable therapeutic efficacy in GBM.
Address Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, Northwestern University, 676 N. St. Clair Street, Suite 2210, Chicago, IL60611, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1568-0096 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27993114 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96616
Permanent link to this record