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Author Kane, S.P.; Hanes, S.D.
Title Unexplained increases in serum vancomycin concentration in a morbidly obese patient Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Intensive & Critical Care Nursing Abbreviated Journal Intensive Crit Care Nurs
Volume 39 Issue (up) Pages 55-58
Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Cross Reactions/physiology; Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Middle Aged; Obesity, Morbid/*drug therapy/physiopathology; Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/drug therapy/prevention & control; Vancomycin/*administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Central venous catheters; Critical care; Drug monitoring; Infectious disease; Medication safety; Vancomycin
Abstract INTRODUCTION: To report a case of increases in vancomycin concentrations without additional vancomycin doses being given. CASE STUDY: A 64 year-old morbidly obese female received three total doses of vancomycin for surgical prophylaxis and for ventilator-associated pneumonia. Subsequent vancomycin concentrations from the patient's central venous catheter (CVC) demonstrated increasing drug levels from 27.1 to 45.9mcg/mL despite no additional vancomycin being given and proper line flushing prior to sample collection. There is no clear explanation for the increase in the patient's vancomycin concentration. Drug leaching from the CVC, enterohepatic recycling, drug redistribution from adipose or other tissues, and assay cross-reactivity with other medications are all potential explanations for the increased vancomycin concentrations. CONCLUSION: This case report describes an unexplained increase in vancomycin concentrations and reinforces both the fallibility of laboratory testing and that unusual circumstances do occur. Several potential causes are hypothesised with CVC drug leaching being the most likely. Nurses and other healthcare providers with similar scenarios should consider a peripheral blood sample to rule out the potential for CVC drug leaching as a possible explanation.
Address Department of Pharmacy Practice, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: scott.hanes@rosalindfranklin.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0964-3397 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27899248 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100001
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Author Phanthaphol, N.; Techasen, A.; Loilome, W.; Thongchot, S.; Thanan, R.; Sungkhamanon, S.; Khuntikeo, N.; Yongvanit, P.; Namwat, N.
Title Upregulation of TCTP is associated with cholangiocarcinoma progression and metastasis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Oncology Letters Abbreviated Journal Oncol Lett
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords 64, 65
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1792-1074 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98395
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Author Cole, D.C.; Giordano, C.R.; Vasilopoulos, T.; Fahy, B.G.
Title Resident Physicians Improve Nontechnical Skills When on Operating Room Management and Leadership Rotation Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Anesthesia and Analgesia Abbreviated Journal Anesth Analg
Volume 124 Issue (up) 1 Pages 300-307
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Anesthesiology residency primarily emphasizes the development of medical knowledge and technical skills. Yet, nontechnical skills (NTS) are also vital to successful clinical practice. Elements of NTS are communication, teamwork, situational awareness, and decision making. METHODS: The first 10 consecutive senior residents who chose to participate in this 2-week elective rotation of operating room (OR) management and leadership training were enrolled in this study, which spanned from March 2013 to March 2015. Each resident served as the anesthesiology officer of the day (AOD) and was tasked with coordinating OR assignments, managing care for 2 to 4 ORs, and being on call for the trauma OR; all residents were supervised by an attending AOD. Leadership and NTS techniques were taught via a standardized curriculum consisting of leadership and team training articles, crisis management text, and daily debriefings. Resident self-ratings and attending AOD and charge nurse raters used the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) scoring system, which involved task management, situational awareness, teamwork, and decision making. For each of the 10 residents in their third year of clinical anesthesiology training (CA-3) who participated in this elective rotation, there were 14 items that required feedback from resident self-assessment and OR raters, including the daily attending AOD and charge nurse. Results for each of the items on the questionnaire were compared between the beginning and the end of the rotation with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched samples. Comparisons were run separately for attending AOD and charge nurse assessments and resident self-assessments. Scaled rankings were analyzed for the Kendall coefficient of concordance (omega) for rater agreement with associated chi and P value. RESULTS: Common themes identified by the residents during debriefings were recurrence of challenging situations and the skills residents needed to instruct and manage clinical teams. For attending AOD and charge nurse assessments, resident performance of NTS improved from the beginning to the end of the rotation on 12 of the 14 NTS items (P < .05), whereas resident self-assessment improved on 3 NTS items (P < .05). Interrater reliability (across the charge nurse, resident, and AOD raters) ranged from omega = .36 to .61 at the beginning of the rotation and omega = .27 to .70 at the end of the rotation. CONCLUSIONS: This rotation allowed for teaching and resident assessment to occur in a way that facilitated resident education in several of the skills required to meet specific milestones. Resident physicians are able to foster NTS and build a framework for clinical leadership when completing a 2-week senior elective as an OR manager.
Address From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, Fla
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-2999 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27918336 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95061
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Author Lacovich, V.; Espindola, S.L.; Alloatti, M.; Pozo Devoto, V.; Cromberg, L.E.; Carna, M.E.; Forte, G.; Gallo, J.-M.; Bruno, L.; Stokin, G.B.; Avale, M.E.; Falzone, T.L.
Title Tau Isoforms Imbalance Impairs the Axonal Transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Human Neurons Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal J Neurosci
Volume 37 Issue (up) 1 Pages 58-69
Keywords App; Alzheimer's; axonal transport; splicing; tau; tauopathies
Abstract Tau, as a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of MT dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) MT binding repeats. Although tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here, we addressed this issue using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content, neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectory analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Conversely, the imbalance toward the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoform imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The tau protein has a relevant role in the transport of cargos throughout neurons. Dysfunction in tau metabolism underlies several neurological disorders leading to dementia. In the adult human brain, two tau isoforms are found in equal amounts, whereas changes in such equilibrium have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the role of tau in human neurons in culture and found that perturbations in the endogenous balance of tau isoforms were sufficient to impair the transport of the Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP), although neuronal morphology was normal. Our results provide evidence of a direct relationship between tau isoform imbalance and defects in axonal transport, which induce an abnormal APP metabolism with important implications in neurodegeneration.
Address Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires C1428ADN, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0270-6474 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28053030 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95902
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Author Polex-Wolf, J.; Yeo, G.S.H.; O'Rahilly, S.
Title Impaired prohormone processing: a grand unified theory for features of Prader-Willi syndrome? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Clinical Investigation Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest
Volume 127 Issue (up) 1 Pages 98-99
Keywords
Abstract Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex disorder that manifests with an array of phenotypes, such as hypotonia and difficulties in feeding during infancy and reduced energy expenditure, hyperphagia, and developmental delays later in life. While the genetic cause has long been known, it is still not clear how mutations at this locus produce this array of phenotypes. In this issue of the JCI, Burnett and colleagues used a comprehensive approach to gain insight into how PWS-associated mutations drive disease. Using neurons derived from PWS patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mouse models, the authors provide evidence that neuroendocrine PWS-associated phenotypes may be linked to reduced expression of prohormone convertase 1 (PC1). While these compelling results support a critical role for PC1 deficiency in PWS, more work needs to be done to fully understand how and to what extent loss of this prohormone processing enzyme underlies disease manifestations in PWS patients.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-9738 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27941250 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95907
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