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Author Thomas, A.A.; Abrey, L.E.; Terziev, R.; Raizer, J.; Martinez, N.L.; Forsyth, P.; Paleologos, N.; Matasar, M.; Sauter, C.S.; Moskowitz, C.; Nimer, S.D.; DeAngelis, L.M.; Kaley, T.; Grimm, S.; Louis, D.N.; Cairncross, J.G.; Panageas, K.S.; Briggs, S.; Faivre, G.; Mohile, N.A.; Mehta, J.; Jonsson, P.; Chakravarty, D.; Gao, J.; Schultz, N.; Brennan, C.W.; Huse, J.T.; Omuro, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multicenter phase II study of temozolomide and myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant for newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume 19 Issue (up) 10 Pages 1380-1390  
  Keywords 1p/19q codeletion; anaplastic oligodendroglioma; autologous stem cell transplant; temozolomide  
  Abstract Background: Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) are chemotherapy-sensitive tumors with prolonged survival after radiochemotherapy. We report a prospective trial using induction temozolomide (TMZ) followed by myeloablative high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT) as a potential strategy to defer radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with AO/AOA received 6 cycles of TMZ (200 mg/m2 x 5/28 day). Responding patients were eligible for HDC (thiotepa 250 mg/m2/day x 3 days, then busulfan 3.2 mg/kg/day x 3 days), followed by ASCT. Genomic characterization was performed using next-generation sequencing. Results: Forty-one patients were enrolled; 85% had 1p/19q codeleted tumors. After induction, 26 patients were eligible for HDC-ASCT and 21 agreed to proceed. There were no unexpected adverse events or toxic deaths. After median follow-up of 66 months, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) for transplanted patients was 86%, 5-year PFS 60%, and no patient has died. Among all 1p/19q codeleted patients (N = 33), 5-year PFS was 50% and 5-year overall survival (OS) 93%, with median time to radiotherapy not reached. Next-generation sequencing disclosed typical oligodendroglioma-related mutations, including IDH1, TERT, CIC, and FUBP1 mutations in 1p/19q codeleted patients, and glioblastoma-like signatures in 1p/19q intact patients. Aside from IDH1, potentially oncogenic/actionable mutations were variable, depicting wide molecular heterogeneity within oligodendroglial tumors. Conclusions: TMZ followed by HDC-ASCT can be safely administered to patients with newly diagnosed 1p/19q codeleted AO. This strategy was associated with promising PFS and OS, suggesting that a chemotherapy-based approach may delay the need for radiotherapy and radiation-related toxicities. Raw data for further genomic and meta-analyses are publicly available at http://cbioportal.org/study?id=odgmsk2017, accessed 6 January 2017. Clinicaltrials.gov registry: NCT00588523.  
  Address Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York,USA; Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA; NorthShore University, Evanston, Illinois,USA; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28472509 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96586  
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Author Vidaurre, T.; Santos, C.; Gomez, H.; Sarria, G.; Amorin, E.; Lopez, M.; Regalado, R.; Manrique, J.; Tarco, D.; Ayestas, C.; Calderon, M.; Mas, L.; Neciosup, S.; Salazar, M.; Chavez, J.C.; Ubillus, M.; Limache, A.; Ubillus, J.C.; Navarro, J.; Sarwal, K.; Sutcliffe, S.; Gutierrez-Aguado, A.; Silva, M.; Mena, A.; Guillen, M.E.; Castaneda, C.; Abugattas, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The implementation of the Plan Esperanza and response to the imPACT Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Oncology Abbreviated Journal Lancet Oncol  
  Volume 18 Issue (up) 10 Pages e595-e606  
  Keywords Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration; Developing Countries; Early Detection of Cancer/*economics; Female; Health Care Costs; *Health Expenditures; Health Planning/*organization & administration; Humans; Male; Needs Assessment; Peru; Poverty; Preventive Medicine/*organization & administration; Risk Assessment  
  Abstract Following the implementation of the National Cancer Prevention and Control Results-based Budget Programme (PpR Cancer-024) in 2011, the Peruvian Government approved the Plan Esperanza-a population-based national cancer control plan-in 2012. Legislation that ensured full government-supported funding for people who were otherwise unable to access or afford care and treatment accompanied the Plan. In 2013, the Ministry of Health requested an integrated mission of the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (imPACT) report to strengthen cancer control in Peru. The imPACT Review, which was executed in 2014, assessed Peru's achievements in cancer control, and areas for improvement, including cancer control planning, further development of population-based cancer registration, increased prevention, early diagnosis, treatment and palliative care, and the engagement and participation of civil society in the health-care system. This Series paper gives a brief history of the development of the Plan Esperanza, describes the innovative funding model that supports it, and summarises how funds are disseminated on the basis of disease, geography, and demographics. An overview of the imPACT Review, and the government's response in the context of the Plan Esperanza, is provided. The development and execution of the Plan Esperanza and the execution of and response to the imPACT Review demonstrates the Peruvian Government's commitment to fighting cancer across the country, including in remote and urban areas.  
  Address National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases, Lima, Peru  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470-2045 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28971826 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97626  
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Author Saunders, M.J.; Wingfield, T.; Tovar, M.A.; Baldwin, M.R.; Datta, S.; Zevallos, K.; Montoya, R.; Valencia, T.R.; Friedland, J.S.; Moulton, L.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Evans, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A score to predict and stratify risk of tuberculosis in adult contacts of tuberculosis index cases: a prospective derivation and external validation cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal Lancet Infect Dis  
  Volume 17 Issue (up) 11 Pages 1190-1199  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Contacts of tuberculosis index cases are at increased risk of developing tuberculosis. Screening, preventive therapy, and surveillance for tuberculosis are underused interventions in contacts, particularly adults. We developed a score to predict risk of tuberculosis in adult contacts of tuberculosis index cases. METHODS: In 2002-06, we recruited contacts aged 15 years or older of index cases with pulmonary tuberculosis who lived in desert shanty towns in Ventanilla, Peru. We followed up contacts for tuberculosis until February, 2016. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to identify index case, contact, and household risk factors for tuberculosis from which to derive a score and classify contacts as low, medium, or high risk. We validated the score in an urban community recruited in Callao, Peru, in 2014-15. FINDINGS: In the derivation cohort, we identified 2017 contacts of 715 index cases, and median follow-up was 10.7 years (IQR 9.5-11.8). 178 (9%) of 2017 contacts developed tuberculosis during 19 147 person-years of follow-up (incidence 0.93 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 0.80-1.08). Risk factors for tuberculosis were body-mass index, previous tuberculosis, age, sustained exposure to the index case, the index case being in a male patient, lower community household socioeconomic position, indoor air pollution, previous tuberculosis among household members, and living in a household with a low number of windows per room. The 10-year risks of tuberculosis in the low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups were, respectively, 2.8% (95% CI 1.7-4.4), 6.2% (4.8-8.1), and 20.6% (17.3-24.4). The 535 (27%) contacts classified as high risk accounted for 60% of the tuberculosis identified during follow-up. The score predicted tuberculosis independently of tuberculin skin test and index-case drug sensitivity results. In the external validation cohort, 65 (3%) of 1910 contacts developed tuberculosis during 3771 person-years of follow-up (incidence 1.7 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 1.4-2.2). The 2.5-year risks of tuberculosis in the low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups were, respectively, 1.4% (95% CI 0.7-2.8), 3.9% (2.5-5.9), and 8.6%. (5.9-12.6). INTERPRETATION: Our externally validated risk score could predict and stratify 10-year risk of developing tuberculosis in adult contacts, and could be used to prioritise tuberculosis control interventions for people most likely to benefit. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, Department for International Development Civil Society Challenge Fund, Joint Global Health Trials consortium, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Imperial College National Institutes of Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, Sir Halley Stewart Trust, WHO, TB REACH, and Innovation for Health and Development.  
  Address Section of Infectious Diseases and Immunity, Imperial College London, London, UK; Wellcome Trust Imperial College Centre for Global Health Research, London, UK; Innovation for Health and Development (IFHAD), Laboratory of Research and Development, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; Innovacion Por la Salud Y Desarrollo (IPSYD), Asociacion Benefica PRISMA, Lima, Peru  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1473-3099 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28827142 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97505  
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Author Del Campo Vega, C.; Tutte, V.; Bermudez, G.; Parra, D.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact on Area-Level Physical Activity Following the Implementation of a Fitness Zone in Montevideo, Uruguay Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Physical Activity & Health Abbreviated Journal J Phys Act Health  
  Volume 14 Issue (up) 11 Pages 883-887  
  Keywords Soparc; observation; parks  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to measure the level of physical activity (PA) of the users of an urban park before and after the installation of 2 fitness zones (FZs) and to assess the impact of that intervention on the users' level of PA. METHODS: The System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities method was applied in the urban plaza Liber Seregni in Montevideo (Uruguay): 14 different areas were mapped and then recategorized as fitness (for PAs, including sports), green, and paved zones. Observations were made in the spring (Sep-Oct) of 2011 and 2014, before and after placing 2 FZs. Participation was analyzed by gender, year, mapped areas, and zones, and significant differences were assessed using the chi2 test. RESULTS: In total, 7342 individuals (4091 men and 3251 women) were observed. A greater number of people with intense PA could be seen in the FZ, with significant differences between 2011 (45%) and 2014 (70%; P < .05). CONCLUSION: This is the first longitudinal study on the impact of an intervention to increase the level of PA in public spaces in Uruguay. Higher intensity levels of PA and fewer sedentary people were observed after the installation of the FZ.  
  Address  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1543-3080 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28556669 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98022  
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Author Shibata, W.; Sohara, M.; Wu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Yagi, S.; Yaguchi, K.; Iizuka, Y.; Iwasa, M.; Nakahata, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okada, M.; Taniguchi, K.; Hayashi, A.; Inazawa, S.; Inagaki, N.; Sasaki, T.; Koh, R.; Kinoshita, H.; Nishio, M.; Ogashiwa, T.; Ookawara, A.; Miyajima, E.; Oba, M.; Ohge, H.; Maeda, S.; Kimura, H.; Kunisaki, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Incidence and Outcomes of Central Venous Catheter-related Blood Stream Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Routine Clinical Practice Setting Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Abbreviated Journal Inflamm Bowel Dis  
  Volume 23 Issue (up) 11 Pages 2042-2047  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occasionally require central venous catheter (CVC) placement to support a therapeutic plan. Given that CVC can predispose patients to infection, this investigation was undertaken to assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CVC-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) in patients with IBD during routine clinical practice. METHODS: Data were compiled using retrospective chart reviews of 1367 patients treated at our IBD center between 2007 and 2012 during routine clinical practice. Among the 1367 patients, 314 who had received CVC placements were included. Patients with positive blood culture were considered as “definite” CRBSI, whereas “possible” CRBSI was defined as patients in whom fever alleviated within 48 hours post-CVC without any other infection. Patients' demographic variables including age, body mass index, serum albumin, duration of CVC placement, use of antibiotics, medications for IBD, and perioperative status between CRBSI and non-CRBSI subgroups were compared by applying a multivariate Poisson logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the 314 patients with CVC placement, there were 83 CRBSI cases (26.4%). The average time to the onset of CRBSI was 22.5 days (range 4-105 days). The jugular vein access was found to be the most serious risk of CRBSI (risk ratio 2.041 versus subclavian vein). All patients with CRBSI fully recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In this investigation, regardless of the patients' demographic features including immunosuppressive therapy, up to 30% of febrile IBD patients with CVC showed CRBSI. It is believed that CVC placement per se is a risk of CRBSI in patients with IBD.  
  Address *Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan;daggerDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan;double daggerSchool of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; section signDepartment of Laboratory Medicine and Clinical Investigation, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan; ||Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; and paragraph signDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University Hospital, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-0998 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29045261 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99359  
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