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Author Khalifa, J.; Tensaouti, F.; Lusque, A.; Plas, B.; Lotterie, J.-A.; Benouaich-Amiel, A.; Uro-Coste, E.; Lubrano, V.; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Subventricular zones: new key targets for glioblastoma treatment Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Radiation Oncology (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Radiat Oncol  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 67  
  Keywords (down) Glioblastoma; Prognostic factors; Radiotherapy; Stem-cell niche; Subventricular Zone  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We aimed to identify subventricular zone (SVZ)-related prognostic factors of survival and patterns of recurrence among patients with glioblastoma. METHODS: Forty-three patients with primary diagnosed glioblastoma treated in our Cancer Center between 2006 and 2010 were identified. All patients received surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. Ipsilateral (iSVZ), contralateral (cSVZ) and bilateral (bSVZ) SVZs were retrospectively segmented and radiation dose-volume histograms were generated. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model was assessed to examine the relationship between prognostic factors and time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Median age was 59 years (range: 25-85). Median follow-up, OS and TTP were 22.7 months (range 7.5-69.7 months), 22.7 months (95% CI 14.5-26.2 months) and 6.4 months (95% CI 4.4-9.3 months), respectively. On univariate analysis, initial contact to SVZ was a poor prognostic factor for OS (18.7 vs 41.7 months, p = 0.014) and TTP (4.6 vs 12.9 months, p = 0.002). Patients whose bSVZ volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20Gy) was greater than 84% had a significantly improved TTP (17.7 months vs 5.2 months, p = 0.017). This radiation dose coverage was compatible with an hippocampal sparing. On multivariate analysis, initial contact to SVZ and V20 Gy to bSVZ lesser than 84% remained poor prognostic factors for TTP (HR = 3.07, p = 0.012 and HR = 2.67, p = 0.047, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that contact to SVZ, as well as insufficient bSVZ radiation dose coverage (V20Gy <84%), might be independent poor prognostic factors for TTP. Therefore, targeting SVZ could be of crucial interest for optimizing glioblastoma treatment.  
  Address INSERM U1037, Centre de Recherche contre le Cancer de Toulouse, 1 avenue Irene Joliot-Curie, Toulouse Cedex, 31059, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1748-717X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28424082 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96593  
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Author Miranda, A.; Blanco-Prieto, M.; Sousa, J.; Pais, A.; Vitorino, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breaching barriers in glioblastoma. Part I: Molecular pathways and novel treatment approaches Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Pharmaceutics Abbreviated Journal Int J Pharm  
  Volume 531 Issue 1 Pages 372-388  
  Keywords (down) Glioblastoma; Molecular mechanisms; Temozolomide; Therapeutic advances; Therapeutic resistance  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour, and the most aggressive in nature. The prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor, with a median survival time of only 1-2 years. The treatment failure relies on the development of resistance by tumour cells and the difficulty of ensuring that drugs effectively cross the dual blood brain barrier/blood brain tumour barrier. The advanced molecular and genetic knowledge has allowed to identify the mechanisms responsible for temozolomide resistance, which represents the standard of care in GBM, along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Such resistance has motivated the researchers to investigate new avenues for GBM treatment intended to improve patient survival. In this review, we provide an overview of major obstacles to effective treatment of GBM, encompassing biological barriers, cancer stem cells, DNA repair mechanisms, deregulated signalling pathways and autophagy. New insights and potential therapy approaches for GBM are also discussed, emphasizing localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain, immunotherapy, gene therapy and nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery.  
  Address Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Pharmacometrics Group of the Centre for Neurosciences and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address: csvitorino@ff.uc.pt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-5173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28755993 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96574  
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Author Munthe, S.; Halle, B.; Boldt, H.B.; Christiansen, H.; Schmidt, S.; Kaimal, V.; Xu, J.; Zabludoff, S.; Mollenhauer, J.; Poulsen, F.R.; Kristensen, B.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift of microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration using patient-derived spheroids and serum-free conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume 132 Issue 1 Pages 45-54  
  Keywords (down) Glioblastoma; MicroRNA; Migration; Serum-free; Target  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent malignant primary brain tumor. A major reason for the overall median survival being only 14.6 months is migrating tumor cells left behind after surgery. Another major reason is tumor cells having a so-called cancer stem cell phenotype being therefore resistant towards traditional chemo- and radiotherapy. A group of novel molecular targets are microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs exerting post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in migrating GBM cells using serum-free stem cell conditions. We used patient-derived GBM spheroid cultures for a novel serum-free migration assay. MiRNA expression of migrating tumor cells isolated at maximum migration speed was compared with corresponding spheroids using an OpenArray Real-Time PCR System. The miRNA profiling revealed 30 miRNAs to be differentially expressed. In total 13 miRNAs were upregulated and 17 downregulated in migrating cells compared to corresponding spheroids. The three most deregulated miRNAs, miR-1227 (up-regulated), miR-32 (down-regulated) and miR-222 (down-regulated), were experimentally overexpressed. A non-significantly increased migration rate was observed after miR-1227 overexpression. A significantly reduced migration rate was observed after miR-32 and miR-222 overexpression. In conclusion a shift in microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration was identified using an assay avoiding serum-induced migration. Both the miRNA profiling and the functional validation suggested that miR-1227 may be associated with increased migration and miR-32 and miR-222 with decreased migration. These miRNAs may represent potential novel targets in migrating glioma cells.  
  Address Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 19, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. bjarne.winther.kristensen@rsyd.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28091986 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96611  
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Author Ludwig, K.; Kornblum, H.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Molecular markers in glioma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (down) Glioblastoma; Glioma stem cell; Molecular markers; Mutations; Pathways  
  Abstract Gliomas are the most malignant and aggressive form of brain tumors, and account for the majority of brain cancer related deaths. Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma are treated with radiation and temozolomide, with only a minor benefit in survival time. A number of advances have been made in understanding glioma biology, including the discovery of cancer stem cells, termed glioma stem cells (GSC). Some of these advances include the delineation of molecular heterogeneity both between tumors from different patients as well as within tumors from the same patient. Such research highlights the importance of identifying and validating molecular markers in glioma. This review, intended as a practical resource for both clinical and basic investigators, summarizes some of the more well-known molecular markers (MGMT, 1p/19q, IDH, EGFR, p53, PI3K, Rb, and RAF), discusses how they are identified, and what, if any, clinical relevance they may have, in addition to discussing some of the specific biology for these markers. Additionally, we discuss identification methods for studying putative GSC's (CD133, CD15, A2B5, nestin, ALDH1, proteasome activity, ABC transporters, and label-retention). While much research has been done on these markers, there is still a significant amount that we do not yet understand, which may account for some conflicting reports in the literature. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the investigator will be able to utilize one single marker to prospectively identify and isolate GSC from all, or possibly, any gliomas.  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Hkornblum@mednet.ucla.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28233083 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Behling, F.; Kaltenstadler, M.; Noell, S.; Schittenhelm, J.; Bender, B.; Eckert, F.; Tabatabai, G.; Tatagiba, M.; Skardelly, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Prognostic Impact of Ventricular Opening in Glioblastoma Surgery: A Retrospective Single Center Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication World Neurosurgery Abbreviated Journal World Neurosurg  
  Volume 106 Issue Pages 615-624  
  Keywords (down) Extent of resection; Glioblastoma; Hydrocephalus; Overall survival; Prognosis; Tumor volume; Ventricle opening  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Ventricular opening during glioblastoma (GBM) resection is controversial. Sufficient evidence regarding its prognostic role is missing. We investigated the impact of ventricular opening on overall survival (OS), hydrocephalus development, and postoperative morbidity in patients with GBM. METHODS: Patients who underwent primary GBM resection between 2006 and 2013 were assessed retrospectively. Established predictors for overall survival (age, Karnofsky Performance Status, extent of resection, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation status) and further clinical data (postoperative status, further treatment, preoperative tumor volume, proximity to the ventricle) were included in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Thirteen (5.7%) of 229 patients developed a hydrocephalus. Multivariate logistic regression showed that neither ventricular opening, tumor size, proximity to the ventricle, nor extent of resection were significant risk factors for hydrocephalus. Ventricular opening did not delay postoperative therapy and was not associated with neurological morbidity. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients who underwent ventricular opening (n = 114) exhibited a median OS of 14.3 months (12.9-16.5), whereas patients who did not undergo ventricular opening (n = 115) exhibited a median OS of 18.6 months (16.1-20.8). However, multivariate Cox regression (n = 134) did not confirm ventricular opening as an independent negative predictor of OS (risk ratio 1.09, P = 0.77). Instead, it showed that a greater preoperative tumor volume >22.8 cm3 was a negative predictor of OS (risk ratio 1.76, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Because extent of resection is a strong independent predictor of OS and ventricular opening is safe, neurosurgeons should consider ventricular opening to achieve maximal tumor resection.  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Tuebingen, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany; Center for CNS Tumors, Comprehensive Cancer Center Tuebingen Stuttgart, University Hospital Tuebingen, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1878-8750 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28729143 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96576  
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