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Author Derose, K.P.; Payan, D.D.; Fulcar, M.A.; Terrero, S.; Acevedo, R.; Farias, H.; Palar, K.
Title Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181568
Keywords (up) Adolescent; Adult; Domestic Violence; Dominican Republic/epidemiology; Female; *Food Supply; HIV/isolation & purification; HIV Infections/*epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Qualitative Research; Social Stigma; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult
Abstract BACKGROUND: Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. METHODS: We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. RESULTS: Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the rights of people living with HIV, reduce HIV-related stigma, and improve gender equality.
Address Division of HIV, ID and Global Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28742870 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97262
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Derose, K.P.; Payan, D.D.; Fulcar, M.A.; Terrero, S.; Acevedo, R.; Farias, H.; Palar, K.
Title Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181568
Keywords (up) Adolescent; Adult; Domestic Violence; Dominican Republic/epidemiology; Female; *Food Supply; HIV/isolation & purification; HIV Infections/*epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Qualitative Research; Social Stigma; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult
Abstract BACKGROUND: Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. METHODS: We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. RESULTS: Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the rights of people living with HIV, reduce HIV-related stigma, and improve gender equality.
Address Division of HIV, ID and Global Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28742870 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98011
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gerceker, G.O.; Yardimci, F.; Aydinok, Y.
Title Randomized controlled trial of care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients Type Randomized Controlled Trial
Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Oncology Nursing : the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society Abbreviated Journal Eur J Oncol Nurs
Volume 28 Issue Pages 14-20
Keywords (up) Adolescent; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Bacteremia/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; *Bandages; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/methods; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child; Child, Preschool; Chlorhexidine/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Patient Care Bundles; Prospective Studies; Turkey
Abstract PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the care bundles including chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings on the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in pediatric hematology-oncology patients with central venous catheters (CVCs). METHOD: Twenty-seven PHO patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study in Turkey. The researcher used care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing in the experimental group (n = 14), and care bundles with advanced dressings in the control group (n = 13). RESULTS: According to the study results, 28.6% of the patients in the experimental group had CRBSI, while this rate was 38.5% in the control group patients. The CRBSI rate in the experimental group was 3.9, and the control group had 4.4 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. There was no exit-site infection in the experimental group. However, the control group had 1.7 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. CONCLUSIONS: Even though there was no difference between the two groups in which the researcher implemented care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings in terms of CRBSI development, there was reduction in the CRBSI rates thanks to the care bundle approach. It is possible to control the CRBSI rates using care bundles in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.
Address Ege University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Hematology-Oncology, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address: yesim.aydinok@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1462-3889 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28478850 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98851
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gerceker, G.O.; Yardimci, F.; Aydinok, Y.
Title Randomized controlled trial of care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients Type Randomized Controlled Trial
Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Oncology Nursing : the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society Abbreviated Journal Eur J Oncol Nurs
Volume 28 Issue Pages 14-20
Keywords (up) Adolescent; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Bacteremia/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; *Bandages; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/methods; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child; Child, Preschool; Chlorhexidine/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Patient Care Bundles; Prospective Studies; Turkey
Abstract PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the care bundles including chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings on the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in pediatric hematology-oncology patients with central venous catheters (CVCs). METHOD: Twenty-seven PHO patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study in Turkey. The researcher used care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing in the experimental group (n = 14), and care bundles with advanced dressings in the control group (n = 13). RESULTS: According to the study results, 28.6% of the patients in the experimental group had CRBSI, while this rate was 38.5% in the control group patients. The CRBSI rate in the experimental group was 3.9, and the control group had 4.4 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. There was no exit-site infection in the experimental group. However, the control group had 1.7 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. CONCLUSIONS: Even though there was no difference between the two groups in which the researcher implemented care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings in terms of CRBSI development, there was reduction in the CRBSI rates thanks to the care bundle approach. It is possible to control the CRBSI rates using care bundles in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.
Address Ege University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Hematology-Oncology, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address: yesim.aydinok@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1462-3889 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28478850 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99881
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, J.W.; Lim, D.H.; Sung, K.W.; Lee, H.J.; Yi, E.S.; Yoo, K.H.; Koo, H.H.; Suh, Y.L.; Shin, H.J.
Title Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for High-Grade Gliomas in Children and Adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 195-203
Keywords (up) Adolescent; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*therapeutic use; Brain Neoplasms/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Carboplatin/administration & dosage; Child; Child, Preschool; Etoposide/administration & dosage; Female; Glioma/*drug therapy/mortality/therapy; Humans; Male; Neoplasm Grading; Remission Induction; Retrospective Studies; Stem Cell Transplantation; Survival Rate; Thiotepa/administration & dosage; Transplantation, Autologous; Treatment Outcome; *Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation; *Brain Tumor; *Children; *High-dose Chemotherapy; *High-grade Glioma
Abstract With the aim to investigate the outcome of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) for high-grade gliomas (HGGs), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with HGGs (16 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 7 other HGGs) between 2006 and 2015. Gross or near total resection was possible in 11 patients. Front-line treatment after surgery was radiotherapy (RT) in 14 patients and chemotherapy in the remaining 16 patients including 3 patients less than 3 years of age. Eight of 12 patients who remained progression free and 5 of the remaining 18 patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent the first HDCT/auto-SCT with carboplatin + thiotepa + etoposide (CTE) regimen and 11 of them proceeded to the second HDCT/auto-SCT with cyclophosphamide + melphalan (CyM) regimen. One patient died from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) during the second HDCT/auto-SCT; otherwise, toxicities were manageable. Four patients in complete response (CR) and 3 of 7 patients in partial response (PR) or second PR at the first HDCT/auto-SCT remained event free: however, 2 patients with progressive tumor experienced progression again. The probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) after the first HDCT/auto-SCT in 11 patients in CR, PR, or second PR was 58.2% +/- 16.9%. Tumor status at the first HDCT/auto-SCT was the only significant factor for outcome after HDCT/auto-SCT. There was no difference in survival between glioblastoma and other HGGs. This study suggests that the outcome of HGGs in children and adolescents after HDCT/auto-SCT is encouraging if the patient could achieve CR or PR before HDCT/auto-SCT.
Address Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. shinhj@skku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28049229 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96614
Permanent link to this record