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Author Brown, D.V.; Filiz, G.; Daniel, P.M.; Hollande, F.; Dworkin, S.; Amiridis, S.; Kountouri, N.; Ng, W.; Morokoff, A.P.; Mantamadiotis, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Expression of CD133 and CD44 in glioblastoma stem cells correlates with cell proliferation, phenotype stability and intra-tumor heterogeneity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages e0172791  
  Keywords AC133 Antigen/*metabolism; Animals; Antigens, CD44/*metabolism; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/metabolism; Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism; Brain Neoplasms/*metabolism/pathology; Cell Proliferation; Female; Glioblastoma/*metabolism/pathology; Humans; Hypoxia; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/pathology; Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism; Phenotype  
  Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is a heterogeneous tumor of the brain with a poor prognosis due to recurrence and drug resistance following therapy. Genome-wide profiling has revealed the existence of distinct GBM molecular subtypes that respond differently to aggressive therapies. Despite this, molecular subtype does not predict recurrence or drug resistance and overall survival is similar across subtypes. One of the key features contributing to tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy is proposed to be an underlying subpopulation of resistant glioma stem cells (GSC). CD133 expression has been used as a marker of GSCs, however recent evidence suggests the relationship between CD133 expression, GSCs and molecular subtype is more complex than initially proposed. The expression of CD133, Olig2 and CD44 was investigated using patient derived glioma stem-like cells (PDGCs) in vitro and in vivo. Different PDGCs exhibited a characteristic equilibrium of distinct CD133+ and CD44+ subpopulations and the influence of environmental factors on the intra-tumor equilibrium of CD133+ and CD44+ cells in PDGCs was also investigated, with hypoxia inducing a CD44+ to CD133+ shift and chemo-radiotherapy inducing a CD133+ to CD44+ shift. These data suggest that surveillance and modulation of intra-tumor heterogeneity using molecular markers at initial surgery and surgery for recurrent GBM may be important for more effective management of GBM.  
  Address Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28241049 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96604  
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Author Ludwig, K.; Kornblum, H.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Molecular markers in glioma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Glioblastoma; Glioma stem cell; Molecular markers; Mutations; Pathways  
  Abstract Gliomas are the most malignant and aggressive form of brain tumors, and account for the majority of brain cancer related deaths. Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma are treated with radiation and temozolomide, with only a minor benefit in survival time. A number of advances have been made in understanding glioma biology, including the discovery of cancer stem cells, termed glioma stem cells (GSC). Some of these advances include the delineation of molecular heterogeneity both between tumors from different patients as well as within tumors from the same patient. Such research highlights the importance of identifying and validating molecular markers in glioma. This review, intended as a practical resource for both clinical and basic investigators, summarizes some of the more well-known molecular markers (MGMT, 1p/19q, IDH, EGFR, p53, PI3K, Rb, and RAF), discusses how they are identified, and what, if any, clinical relevance they may have, in addition to discussing some of the specific biology for these markers. Additionally, we discuss identification methods for studying putative GSC's (CD133, CD15, A2B5, nestin, ALDH1, proteasome activity, ABC transporters, and label-retention). While much research has been done on these markers, there is still a significant amount that we do not yet understand, which may account for some conflicting reports in the literature. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the investigator will be able to utilize one single marker to prospectively identify and isolate GSC from all, or possibly, any gliomas.  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Hkornblum@mednet.ucla.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28233083 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96605  
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Author Alshehri, M.M.; Robbins, S.M.; Senger, D.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Role of Neurotrophin Signaling in Gliomagenesis: A Focus on the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor (p75NTR/CD271) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Vitamins and Hormones Abbreviated Journal Vitam Horm  
  Volume 104 Issue Pages 367-404  
  Keywords Brain tumor; Cd271; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; Glioma invasion; Nerve growth factor; Neurotrophin; p75(NTR)  
  Abstract The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR, a.k.a. CD271), a transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis family (TNF) of receptors, was originally identified as a nerve growth factor receptor in the mid-1980s. While p75NTR is recognized to have important roles during neural development, its presence in both neural and nonneural tissues clearly supports the potential to mediate a broad range of functions depending on cellular context. Using an unbiased in vivo selection paradigm for genes underlying the invasive behavior of glioma, a critical characteristic that contributes to poor clinical outcome for glioma patients, we identified p75NTR as a central regulator of glioma invasion. Herein we review the expanding role that p75NTR plays in glioma progression with an emphasis on how p75NTR may contribute to the treatment refractory nature of glioma. Based on the observation that p75NTR is expressed and functional in two critical glioma disease reservoirs, namely, the highly infiltrative cells that evade surgical resection, and the radiation- and chemotherapy-resistant brain tumor-initiating cells (also referred to as brain tumor stem cells), we propose that p75NTR and its myriad of downstream signaling effectors represent rationale therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. Lastly, we provide the provocative hypothesis that, in addition to the well-documented cell autonomous signaling functions, the neurotrophins, and their respective receptors, contribute in a cell nonautonomous manner to drive the complex cellular and molecular composition of the brain tumor microenvironment, an environment that fuels tumorigenesis.  
  Address Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. Electronic address: senger@ucalgary.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0083-6729 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28215302 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96606  
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Author D'Alessandris, Q.G.; Biffoni, M.; Martini, M.; Runci, D.; Buccarelli, M.; Cenci, T.; Signore, M.; Stancato, L.; Olivi, A.; De Maria, R.; Larocca, L.M.; Ricci-Vitiani, L.; Pallini, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The clinical value of patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres in predicting treatment response Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 1097-1108  
  Keywords cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; radiotherapy; temozolomide; treatment outcome  
  Abstract Background: Advances from glioma stemlike cell (GSC) research, though increasing our knowledge of glioblastoma (GBM) biology, do not influence clinical decisions yet. We explored the translational power of GSC-enriched cultures from patient-derived tumorspheres (TS) in predicting treatment response. Methods: The relationship between TS growth and clinical outcome was investigated in 52 GBMs treated with surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). The effect on TS of radiation (6 to 60 Gy) and of TMZ (3.9 muM to 1 mM) was related with patients' survival. Results: Generation of TS was an independent factor for poor overall survival (OS) and poor progression-free survival (PFS) (P < .0001 and P = .0010, respectively). Growth rate and clonogenicity of TS predicted poor OS. In general, TS were highly resistant to both radiation and TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was stronger in TS with high clonogenicity and fast growth (P < .02). Shorter PFS was associated with radiation LD50 (lethal dose required to kill 50% of TS cells) >12 Gy of matched TS (P = .0484). A direct relationship was found between sensitivity of TS to TMZ and patients' survival (P = .0167 and P = .0436 for OS and PFS, respectively). Importantly, values for TMZ half-maximal inhibitory concentration <50 muM, which are in the range of plasma levels achieved in vivo, identified cases with longer OS and PFS (P = .0020 and P = .0016, respectively). Conclusions: Analysis of TS holds translational relevance by predicting the response of parent tumors to radiation and, particularly, to TMZ. Dissecting the clonogenic population from proliferating progeny in TS can guide therapeutic strategies to a more effective drug selection and treatment duration.  
  Address Institute of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy; Institute of Pathology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28204560 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96607  
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Author Howard, C.M.; Valluri, J.; Alberico, A.; Julien, T.; Mazagri, R.; Marsh, R.; Alastair, H.; Cortese, A.; Griswold, M.; Wang, W.; Denning, K.; Brown, L.; Claudio, P.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Chemopredictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Oncology Abbreviated Journal Transl Oncol  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 241-254  
  Keywords  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) treated with standard-of-care maximal surgical resection and concurrent adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ)/radiotherapy remains very poor (less than 15 months). GBMs have been found to contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. The highly invasive nature of high-grade gliomas and their inherent resistance to therapy lead to very high rates of recurrence. For these reasons, not all patients with similar diagnoses respond to the same chemotherapy, schedule, or dose. Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is not only costly but more importantly burdens the patient with unnecessary toxicity and selects for the development of resistant cancer cell clones. We have developed a drug response assay (ChemoID) that identifies the most effective chemotherapy against CSCs and bulk of tumor cells from of a panel of potential treatments, offering great promise for individualized cancer management. Providing the treating physician with drug response information on a panel of approved drugs will aid in personalized therapy selections of the most effective chemotherapy for individual patients, thereby improving outcomes. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of the ChemoID drug response assay in GBM patients treated with standard of care. METHODS: Forty-one GBM patients (mean age 54 years, 59% male), all eligible for a surgical biopsy, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for drug sensitivity testing. Patients were all treated with standard-of-care TMZ plus radiation with or without maximal surgery, depending on the status of the disease. Patients were prospectively monitored for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Odds ratio (OR) associations of 12-month recurrence, PFS, and OS outcomes were estimated for CSC, bulk tumor, and combined assay responses for the standard-of-care TMZ treatment; sensitivities/specificities, areas under the curve (AUCs), and risk reclassification components were examined. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-49 months). For every 5% increase in in vitro CSC cell kill by TMZ, 12-month patient response (nonrecurrence of cancer) increased two-fold, OR=2.2 (P=.016). Similar but somewhat less supported associations with the bulk tumor test were seen, OR=2.75 (P=.07) for each 5% bulk tumor cell kill by TMZ. Combining CSC and bulk tumor assay results in a single model yielded a statistically supported CSC association, OR=2.36 (P=.036), but a much attenuated remaining bulk tumor association, OR=1.46 (P=.472). AUCs and [sensitivity/specificity] at optimal outpoints (>40% CSC cell kill and >55% bulk tumor cell kill) were AUC=0.989 [sensitivity=100/specificity=97], 0.972 [100/89], and 0.989 [100/97] for the CSC only, bulk tumor only, and combined models, respectively. Risk categorization of patients was improved by 11% when using the CSC test in conjunction with the bulk test (risk reclassification nonevent net reclassification improvement [NRI] and overall NRI=0.111, P=.030). Median recurrence time was 20 months for patients with a positive (>40% cell kill) CSC test versus only 3 months for those with a negative CSC test, whereas median recurrence time was 13 months versus 4 months for patients with a positive (>55% cell kill) bulk test versus negative. Similar favorable results for the CSC test were observed for PFS and OS outcomes. Panel results across 14 potential other treatments indicated that 34/41 (83%) potentially more optimal alternative therapies may have been chosen using CSC results, whereas 27/41 (66%) alternative therapies may have been chosen using bulk tumor results. CONCLUSIONS: The ChemoID CSC drug response assay has the potential to increase the accuracy of bulk tumor assays to help guide individualized chemotherapy choices. GBM cancer recurrence may occur quickly if the CSC test has a low in vitro cell kill rate even if the bulk tumor test cell kill rate is high.  
  Address Department of BioMolecular Sciences, National Center for Natural Products Research, University of Mississippi, University, MS; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center Cancer Institute, Jackson, MS 39216. Electronic address: pclaudio@olemiss.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1936-5233 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28199863 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96608  
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