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Author Ferreira, A.A.; Souza-Filho, Z.A.; Goncalves, M.J.F.; Santos, J.; Pierin, A.M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between alcohol drinking and arterial hypertension in indigenous people of the Mura ethnics, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages e0182352  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Brazil/epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Hypertension/epidemiology/*etiology; Male; Middle Aged; Population Groups/*statistics & numerical data; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Smoking/*adverse effects; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify the consumption of alcoholic beverage and the relation with hypertension, their prevalence and associated factors, in indigenous Mura, Brazil. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with 455 adult indigenous aged 18 years or more of Mura ethnics in Amazonia, Brazil. Interview was conducted and the alcohol intake was assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Blood pressure was measured in three measurements and the mean of the last two measurements was used. Physical examination included the following data: weight, height, waist and neck circumference, bioimpedance, and capillary measurement of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Through multivariate Logistic regression in stepwise, the odds ratios for alcohol consumption and associated factors were identified. RESULTS: The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was 40.2%, with no significant difference for hypertension in those who drink (23.0%) and those who did not drink (29.0%). Referred hypertension in indigenous was associated to less use of alcoholic beverages (14.2% vs 24.3%, P = 0.009). After an adjusted analysis (Odds Ratio, 95% CI), there was a positive association between alcoholic drink intake and male sex (10.27, CI: 5.76-18.30), smoking (4.72, CI: 2.35-9.46) and live in rural areas (9.77, CI: 5.08-18.79). On the other hand, age (0.95, IC: 0.94-0.97), and absence of dyslipidemia (0.41, CI: 0.19-0.89) were associated to lower alcohol consumption. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was high and associated with referred hypertension, but this association was not maintained after adjusted analysis. Changes to habits and inappropriate lifestyles in indigenous populations and living in urban areas may contribute to increase risk for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, health policies should be implemented to meet the uniqueness of indigenous people.  
  Address Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:28777805 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98010  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Magrath, J.W.; Kim, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salinomycin's potential to eliminate glioblastoma stem cells and treat glioblastoma multiforme (Review) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Oncology Abbreviated Journal Int J Oncol  
  Volume 51 Issue 3 Pages 753-759  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest form of primary brain tumor. Despite treatment with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with the drug temozolomide, the expected survival after diagnosis remains low. The median survival is only 14.6 months and the two-year survival is a mere 30%. One reason for this is the heterogeneity of GBM including the presence of glioblastoma cancer stem cells (GSCs). GSCs are a subset of cells with the unique ability to proliferate, differentiate, and create tumors. GSCs are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and thought to play an important role in recurrence. In order to effectively treat GBM, a drug must be identified that can kill GSCs. The ionophore salinomycin has been shown to kill cancer stem cells and is therefore a promising future treatment for GBM. This study focuses on salinomycin's potential to treat GBM including its ability to reduce the CSC population, its toxicity to normal brain cells, its mechanism of action, and its potential for combination treatment.  
  Address Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0203, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1019-6439 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:28766685 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96573  
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Author Miranda, A.; Blanco-Prieto, M.; Sousa, J.; Pais, A.; Vitorino, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breaching barriers in glioblastoma. Part I: Molecular pathways and novel treatment approaches Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Pharmaceutics Abbreviated Journal Int J Pharm  
  Volume 531 Issue 1 Pages 372-388  
  Keywords Glioblastoma; Molecular mechanisms; Temozolomide; Therapeutic advances; Therapeutic resistance  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour, and the most aggressive in nature. The prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor, with a median survival time of only 1-2 years. The treatment failure relies on the development of resistance by tumour cells and the difficulty of ensuring that drugs effectively cross the dual blood brain barrier/blood brain tumour barrier. The advanced molecular and genetic knowledge has allowed to identify the mechanisms responsible for temozolomide resistance, which represents the standard of care in GBM, along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Such resistance has motivated the researchers to investigate new avenues for GBM treatment intended to improve patient survival. In this review, we provide an overview of major obstacles to effective treatment of GBM, encompassing biological barriers, cancer stem cells, DNA repair mechanisms, deregulated signalling pathways and autophagy. New insights and potential therapy approaches for GBM are also discussed, emphasizing localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain, immunotherapy, gene therapy and nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery.  
  Address Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Pharmacometrics Group of the Centre for Neurosciences and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address: csvitorino@ff.uc.pt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-5173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:28755993 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96574  
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Author Yin, J.; Oh, Y.T.; Kim, J.-Y.; Kim, S.S.; Choi, E.; Kim, T.H.; Hong, J.H.; Chang, N.; Cho, H.J.; Sa, J.K.; Kim, J.C.; Kwon, H.J.; Park, S.; Lin, W.; Nakano, I.; Gwak, H.-S.; Yoo, H.; Lee, S.-H.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.-Y.; Nam, D.-H.; Park, M.-J.; Park, J.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Transglutaminase 2 Inhibition Reverses Mesenchymal Transdifferentiation of Glioma Stem Cells by Regulating C/EBPbeta Signaling Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 77 Issue 18 Pages 4973-4984  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Necrosis is a hallmark of glioblastoma (GBM) and is responsible for poor prognosis and resistance to conventional therapies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying necrotic microenvironment-induced malignancy of GBM have not been elucidated. Here, we report that transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) is upregulated in the perinecrotic region of GBM and triggered mesenchymal (MES) transdifferentiation of glioma stem cells (GSC) by regulating master transcription factors (TF), such as C/EBPbeta, TAZ, and STAT3. TGM2 expression was induced by macrophages/microglia-derived cytokines via NF-kappaB activation and further degraded DNA damage-inducible transcript 3 (GADD153) to induce C/EBPbeta expression, resulting in expression of the MES transcriptome. Downregulation of TGM2 decreased sphere-forming ability, tumor size, and radioresistance and survival in a xenograft mouse model through a loss of the MES signature. A TGM2-specific inhibitor GK921 blocked MES transdifferentiation and showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mouse models of GSC. Moreover, TGM2 expression was significantly increased in recurrent MES patients and inversely correlated with patient prognosis. Collectively, our results indicate that TGM2 is a key molecular switch of necrosis-induced MES transdifferentiation and an important therapeutic target for MES GBM. Cancer Res; 77(18); 4973-84. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Specific Organs Cancer Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:28754668 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96575  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Derose, K.P.; Payan, D.D.; Fulcar, M.A.; Terrero, S.; Acevedo, R.; Farias, H.; Palar, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181568  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Domestic Violence; Dominican Republic/epidemiology; Female; *Food Supply; HIV/isolation & purification; HIV Infections/*epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Qualitative Research; Social Stigma; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. METHODS: We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. RESULTS: Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the rights of people living with HIV, reduce HIV-related stigma, and improve gender equality.  
  Address Division of HIV, ID and Global Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:28742870 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97262  
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