toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Jin, W.-L.; Mao, X.-Y.; Qiu, G.-Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Targeting Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Expectations and Challenges Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Medicinal Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Med Res Rev  
  Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 627-661  
  Keywords Animals; Carcinogenesis/pathology; Deubiquitinating Enzymes/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism; Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology; Glioblastoma/*enzymology/*therapy; Humans; *Molecular Targeted Therapy; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/pathology; DUB inhibitor; DUBs; glioblastoma; glioma stem cells; proteasome  
  Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is regarded as the most common primary intracranial neoplasm. Despite standard treatment with tumor resection and radiochemotherapy, the outcome remains gloomy. It is evident that a combination of oncogenic gain of function and tumor-suppressive loss of function has been attributed to glioma initiation and progression. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a well-orchestrated system that controls the fate of most proteins by striking a dynamic balance between ubiquitination and deubiquitination of substrates, having a profound influence on the modulation of oncoproteins, tumor suppressors, and cellular signaling pathways. In recent years, deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) have emerged as potential anti-cancer targets due to their targeting several key proteins involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis, apoptosis, senescence, and autophagy. This review attempts to summarize recent studies of GBM-associated DUBs, their roles in various cellular processes, and discuss the relation between DUBs deregulation and gliomagenesis, especially how DUBs regulate glioma stem cells pluripotency, microenvironment, and resistance of radiation and chemotherapy through core stem-cell transcriptional factors. We also review recent achievements and progress in the development of potent and selective reversible inhibitors of DUBs, and attempted to find a potential GBM treatment by DUBs intervention.  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Command, Jinan, 250031, P. R. China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0198-6325 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27775833 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96629  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204  
  Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors  
  Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.  
  Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27777377 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97187  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204  
  Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors  
  Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.  
  Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27777377 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barros, J.; Morales, S.; Echavarri, O.; Garcia, A.; Ortega, J.; Asahi, T.; Moya, C.; Fischman, R.; Maino, M.P.; Nunez, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Suicide detection in Chile: proposing a predictive model for suicide risk in a clinical sample of patients with mood disorders Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria (Sao Paulo, Brazil : 1999) Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Psiquiatr  
  Volume 39 Issue 1 Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chile; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Disorders/complications/*psychology; Middle Aged; Models, Theoretical; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Socioeconomic Factors; Suicide/*prevention & control; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult  
  Abstract Objective:: To analyze suicidal behavior and build a predictive model for suicide risk using data mining (DM) analysis. Methods:: A study of 707 Chilean mental health patients (with and without suicide risk) was carried out across three healthcare centers in the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile. Three hundred forty-three variables were studied using five questionnaires. DM and machine-learning tools were used via the support vector machine technique. Results:: The model selected 22 variables that, depending on the circumstances in which they all occur, define whether a person belongs in a suicide risk zone (accuracy = 0.78, sensitivity = 0.77, and specificity = 0.79). Being in a suicide risk zone means patients are more vulnerable to suicide attempts or are thinking about suicide. The interrelationship between these variables is highly nonlinear, and it is interesting to note the particular ways in which they are configured for each case. The model shows that the variables of a suicide risk zone are related to individual unrest, personal satisfaction, and reasons for living, particularly those related to beliefs in one's own capacities and coping abilities. Conclusion:: These variables can be used to create an assessment tool and enables us to identify individual risk and protective factors. This may also contribute to therapeutic intervention by strengthening feelings of personal well-being and reasons for staying alive. Our results prompted the design of a new clinical tool, which is fast and easy to use and aids in evaluating the trajectory of suicide risk at a given moment.  
  Address Private practice  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1516-4446 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27783715 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97654  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mihu, M.R.; Cabral, V.; Pattabhi, R.; Tar, M.T.; Davies, K.P.; Friedman, A.J.; Martinez, L.R.; Nosanchuk, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Interfere with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in a Rat Central Venous Catheter Model Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Abbreviated Journal Antimicrob Agents Chemother  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/*drug effects/growth & development; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Chitosan/chemistry/pharmacology; Delayed-Action Preparations; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Glucose/chemistry; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development/ultrastructure; Nanoparticles/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Nitric Oxide/chemical synthesis/*pharmacology; Oxidation-Reduction; Plankton/drug effects/growth & development; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Sodium Nitrite/chemistry; Staphylococcal Infections/*drug therapy/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; antimicrobials; biofilms; nanoparticles; nitric oxide  
  Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is frequently isolated in the setting of infections of indwelling medical devices, which are mediated by the microbe's ability to form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts and often cause chronic infections and sepsis, particularly in patients with prolonged hospitalizations. In this study, we demonstrate that sustained nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) interfere with S. aureus adhesion and prevent biofilm formation on a rat central venous catheter (CVC) model of infection. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy showed that NO-np-treated staphylococcal biofilms displayed considerably reduced thicknesses and bacterial numbers compared to those of control biofilms in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Although both phenotypes, planktonic and biofilm-associated staphylococci, of multiple clinical strains were susceptible to NO-np, bacteria within biofilms were more resistant to killing than their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, chitosan, a biopolymer found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and structurally integrated into the nanoparticles, seems to add considerable antimicrobial activity to the technology. Our findings suggest promising development and translational potential of NO-np for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic against bacterial biofilms on CVCs and other medical devices.  
  Address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0066-4804 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27821454 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99131  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: