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Author Navarrete-Reyes, A.P.; Medina-Rimoldi, C.T.; Avila-Funes, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Correlates of subjective transportation deficiency among older adults attending outpatient clinics in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Geriatrics & Gerontology International Abbreviated Journal Geriatr Gerontol Int  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Latin America; disability; mobility; older adults; transportation  
  Abstract AIM: Older adults frequently report problems of transportation. Little is known about the correlates of transportation deficiency in Latin America. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the correlates of subjective transportation deficiency (STD) among community-dwelling older adults attending a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 228 participants aged >/=70 years being followed in any of the outpatient clinics of a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. Data were obtained through a structured questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out in order to identify the correlates of STD. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 79.8 years (SD 6.4) and 67.1% were women. STD was present in 46% of participants. The multivariate logistic regression model showed that female sex, illiteracy, mobility disability and the use of an assistive walking device had an independent and statistically significant association with STD. CONCLUSIONS: Female sex, illiteracy, mobility disability and the use of an assistive walking device were independent correlates of STD in the present study. Identifying the frequency and correlates of transportation deficiency in vulnerable populations will allow for the identification and implementation of useful public policies, as well as for the optimization of prevention and treatment strategies in an attempt to preserve mobility and autonomy, especially in low- and middle-income countries where previous work on transportation deficiency is lacking. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; : -**.  
  Address Research Center INSERM, Bordeaux, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1447-0594 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28190303 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97448  
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Author Howard, C.M.; Valluri, J.; Alberico, A.; Julien, T.; Mazagri, R.; Marsh, R.; Alastair, H.; Cortese, A.; Griswold, M.; Wang, W.; Denning, K.; Brown, L.; Claudio, P.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Chemopredictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Oncology Abbreviated Journal Transl Oncol  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 241-254  
  Keywords  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) treated with standard-of-care maximal surgical resection and concurrent adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ)/radiotherapy remains very poor (less than 15 months). GBMs have been found to contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. The highly invasive nature of high-grade gliomas and their inherent resistance to therapy lead to very high rates of recurrence. For these reasons, not all patients with similar diagnoses respond to the same chemotherapy, schedule, or dose. Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is not only costly but more importantly burdens the patient with unnecessary toxicity and selects for the development of resistant cancer cell clones. We have developed a drug response assay (ChemoID) that identifies the most effective chemotherapy against CSCs and bulk of tumor cells from of a panel of potential treatments, offering great promise for individualized cancer management. Providing the treating physician with drug response information on a panel of approved drugs will aid in personalized therapy selections of the most effective chemotherapy for individual patients, thereby improving outcomes. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of the ChemoID drug response assay in GBM patients treated with standard of care. METHODS: Forty-one GBM patients (mean age 54 years, 59% male), all eligible for a surgical biopsy, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for drug sensitivity testing. Patients were all treated with standard-of-care TMZ plus radiation with or without maximal surgery, depending on the status of the disease. Patients were prospectively monitored for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Odds ratio (OR) associations of 12-month recurrence, PFS, and OS outcomes were estimated for CSC, bulk tumor, and combined assay responses for the standard-of-care TMZ treatment; sensitivities/specificities, areas under the curve (AUCs), and risk reclassification components were examined. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-49 months). For every 5% increase in in vitro CSC cell kill by TMZ, 12-month patient response (nonrecurrence of cancer) increased two-fold, OR=2.2 (P=.016). Similar but somewhat less supported associations with the bulk tumor test were seen, OR=2.75 (P=.07) for each 5% bulk tumor cell kill by TMZ. Combining CSC and bulk tumor assay results in a single model yielded a statistically supported CSC association, OR=2.36 (P=.036), but a much attenuated remaining bulk tumor association, OR=1.46 (P=.472). AUCs and [sensitivity/specificity] at optimal outpoints (>40% CSC cell kill and >55% bulk tumor cell kill) were AUC=0.989 [sensitivity=100/specificity=97], 0.972 [100/89], and 0.989 [100/97] for the CSC only, bulk tumor only, and combined models, respectively. Risk categorization of patients was improved by 11% when using the CSC test in conjunction with the bulk test (risk reclassification nonevent net reclassification improvement [NRI] and overall NRI=0.111, P=.030). Median recurrence time was 20 months for patients with a positive (>40% cell kill) CSC test versus only 3 months for those with a negative CSC test, whereas median recurrence time was 13 months versus 4 months for patients with a positive (>55% cell kill) bulk test versus negative. Similar favorable results for the CSC test were observed for PFS and OS outcomes. Panel results across 14 potential other treatments indicated that 34/41 (83%) potentially more optimal alternative therapies may have been chosen using CSC results, whereas 27/41 (66%) alternative therapies may have been chosen using bulk tumor results. CONCLUSIONS: The ChemoID CSC drug response assay has the potential to increase the accuracy of bulk tumor assays to help guide individualized chemotherapy choices. GBM cancer recurrence may occur quickly if the CSC test has a low in vitro cell kill rate even if the bulk tumor test cell kill rate is high.  
  Address Department of BioMolecular Sciences, National Center for Natural Products Research, University of Mississippi, University, MS; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center Cancer Institute, Jackson, MS 39216. Electronic address: pclaudio@olemiss.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1936-5233 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28199863 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96608  
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Author D'Alessandris, Q.G.; Biffoni, M.; Martini, M.; Runci, D.; Buccarelli, M.; Cenci, T.; Signore, M.; Stancato, L.; Olivi, A.; De Maria, R.; Larocca, L.M.; Ricci-Vitiani, L.; Pallini, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The clinical value of patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres in predicting treatment response Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 1097-1108  
  Keywords cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; radiotherapy; temozolomide; treatment outcome  
  Abstract Background: Advances from glioma stemlike cell (GSC) research, though increasing our knowledge of glioblastoma (GBM) biology, do not influence clinical decisions yet. We explored the translational power of GSC-enriched cultures from patient-derived tumorspheres (TS) in predicting treatment response. Methods: The relationship between TS growth and clinical outcome was investigated in 52 GBMs treated with surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). The effect on TS of radiation (6 to 60 Gy) and of TMZ (3.9 muM to 1 mM) was related with patients' survival. Results: Generation of TS was an independent factor for poor overall survival (OS) and poor progression-free survival (PFS) (P < .0001 and P = .0010, respectively). Growth rate and clonogenicity of TS predicted poor OS. In general, TS were highly resistant to both radiation and TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was stronger in TS with high clonogenicity and fast growth (P < .02). Shorter PFS was associated with radiation LD50 (lethal dose required to kill 50% of TS cells) >12 Gy of matched TS (P = .0484). A direct relationship was found between sensitivity of TS to TMZ and patients' survival (P = .0167 and P = .0436 for OS and PFS, respectively). Importantly, values for TMZ half-maximal inhibitory concentration <50 muM, which are in the range of plasma levels achieved in vivo, identified cases with longer OS and PFS (P = .0020 and P = .0016, respectively). Conclusions: Analysis of TS holds translational relevance by predicting the response of parent tumors to radiation and, particularly, to TMZ. Dissecting the clonogenic population from proliferating progeny in TS can guide therapeutic strategies to a more effective drug selection and treatment duration.  
  Address Institute of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy; Institute of Pathology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28204560 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96607  
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Author Loza-Correa, M.; Kou, Y.; Taha, M.; Kalab, M.; Ronholm, J.; Schlievert, P.M.; Cahill, M.P.; Skeate, R.; Cserti-Gazdewich, C.; Ramirez-Arcos, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Transfusion Abbreviated Journal Transfusion  
  Volume 57 Issue 5 Pages 1299-1303  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy; Platelet Transfusion/*adverse effects; Sepsis/*etiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*transmission; *Staphylococcus aureus; Transfusion Reaction/*microbiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. CASE REPORT: This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. DISCUSSION: As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. CONCLUSION: Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units.  
  Address Canadian Blood Services  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0041-1132 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28205241 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99087  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Loza-Correa, M.; Kou, Y.; Taha, M.; Kalab, M.; Ronholm, J.; Schlievert, P.M.; Cahill, M.P.; Skeate, R.; Cserti-Gazdewich, C.; Ramirez-Arcos, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Transfusion Abbreviated Journal Transfusion  
  Volume 57 Issue 5 Pages 1299-1303  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy; Platelet Transfusion/*adverse effects; Sepsis/*etiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*transmission; *Staphylococcus aureus; Transfusion Reaction/*microbiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. CASE REPORT: This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. DISCUSSION: As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. CONCLUSION: Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units.  
  Address Canadian Blood Services  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0041-1132 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28205241 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100117  
Permanent link to this record
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