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Author Goncalves, P.B.; Hallal, P.C.; Hino, A.A.F.; Reis, R.S.
Title Individual and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adults from Curitiba, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Public Health
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Accelerometry; Adults; Environmental correlates; Individual correlates; Physical activity; Sedentary time
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association of individual and neighborhood environment characteristics and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in adults from Curitiba, Brazil. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted through face-to-face household interviews in 2010. The analytic sample included 305 adults aged 20-65 years recruited from 32 census tracts selected according to neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status. Individual and environmental PA correlates were evaluated through standardized and valid self-reported measures, including the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Minutes per week of PA and ST were assessed through accelerometry. Multi-level regression models were used in the analyses. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders the strongest individual and environmental correlates associated with ST was residential density (B = 0.14; p = 0.008), light-intensity PA was being a father/mother (B = 35.71; p = 0.025) and moderate-to-vigorous PA was sex (B = 0.91; p < 0.001) and number of cars (one car, B = -1.05; two cars, B = -1.14; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The associations found with individual and environmental correlates varied accordingly across all outcomes. Future changes in policies and infrastructure should consider the social context of the community and improvements to promote a safer environment in the neighborhood.
Address Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1661-8556 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28717827 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98014
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Author McCloskey, M.L.; Tarazona-Meza, C.E.; Jones-Smith, J.C.; Miele, C.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Miranda, J.J.; Checkley, W.
Title Disparities in dietary intake and physical activity patterns across the urbanization divide in the Peruvian Andes Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act
Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 90
Keywords 24-h recall; Chronic diseases; Low- and middle income countries; Nutrition transition; Overweight; Urbanization
Abstract BACKGROUND: Diet and activity are thought to worsen with urbanization, thereby increasing risk of obesity and chronic diseases. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns across the urbanization divide may help identify pathways, and therefore intervention targets, leading to the epidemic of overweight seen in low- and middle-income populations. Therefore, we sought to characterize diet and activity in a population-based study of urban and rural residents in Puno, Peru. METHODS: We compared diet and activity in 1005 (503 urban, 502 rural) participants via a lifestyle questionnaire. We then recruited an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 50 (25 urban, 25 rural) participants to further characterize diet and activity. Among these participants, diet composition and macronutrient intake was assessed by three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity was assessed using Omron JH-720itc pedometers. RESULTS: Among 1005 participants, we found that urban residents consumed protein-rich foods, refined grains, sugary items, and fresh produce more frequently than rural residents. Among the 50 subsample participants, urban dwellers consumed more protein (47 vs. 39 g; p = 0.05), more carbohydrates (280 vs. 220 g; p = 0.03), more sugary foods (98 vs. 48 g, p = 0.02) and had greater dietary diversity (6.4 vs 5.8; p = 0.04). Rural subsample participants consumed more added salt (3.1 vs 1.7 g, p = 0.006) and tended to consume more vegetable oil. As estimated by pedometers, urban subsample participants burned fewer calories per day (191 vs 270 kcal, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Although urbanization is typically thought to increase consumption of fat, sugar and salt, our 24-h recall results were mixed and showed lower levels of obesity in rural Puno were not necessarily indicative of nutritionally-balanced diets. All subsample participants had relatively traditional lifestyles (low fat intake, limited consumption of processed foods and frequent walking) that may play a role in chronic disease outcomes in this region.
Address Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima, Peru. wcheckl1@jhmi.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28693514 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98015
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Author Piovezan, R.D.; Hirotsu, C.; Feres, M.C.; Cintra, F.D.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Poyares, D.
Title Obstructive sleep apnea and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of serum vitamin D deficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0180901
Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Humans; Hypertension/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity/physiopathology; Polysomnography; Risk Factors; Sedentary Lifestyle; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep/physiology; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Sleep Wake Disorders/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Smoking/physiopathology; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vitamin D/*blood; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies demonstrate an association between vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and sleep disturbances, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration. However, to date, no studies have concurrently and objectively evaluated the effect of these factors on 25(OH)D. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether OSA and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with reduced 25(OH)D in an adult population sample. METHODS: A cross-sectional study included 657 individuals from the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, as part of the ERA project. Participants fulfilled questionnaires and underwent clinical evaluation, polysomnography and blood sample collection for 25(OH)D quantification. OSA was classified into three categories (mild, moderate and severe). The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was considered as levels<30 ng/mL. Short sleep duration was defined as total sleep time<6 hours. RESULTS: The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was observed in 59.5% of the sample, affecting more individuals of the female gender, obese, with African American ethnicity, and those that were smokers, sedentary and presented hypertension and diabetes. In the final logistic model adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, obesity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, seasonality and creatinine serum levels, both OSA and short sleep duration showed significant independent associations with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency (moderate OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.35-3.64, p<0.01; severe OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.06-3.00, p = 0.03; short sleep duration: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.15-2.26, p = 0.01). After a subgroup analysis, similar results were observed only in participants >/=50 years. CONCLUSION: OSA and short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency in an adult population. Age-related changes in vitamin D metabolism and the frequency of sleep disorders may be involved in these associations. Future studies exploring whether 25(OH)D levels may modulate OSA and sleep curtailment-related outcomes are needed.
Address Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28686746 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98016
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Author Herrero, M.; Thornton, P.K.; Power, B.; Bogard, J.R.; Remans, R.; Fritz, S.; Gerber, J.S.; Nelson, G.; See, L.; Waha, K.; Watson, R.A.; West, P.C.; Samberg, L.H.; van de Steeg, J.; Stephenson, E.; van Wijk, M.; Havlik, P.
Title Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Planetary Health Abbreviated Journal Lancet Planet Health
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages e33-e42
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Information about the global structure of agriculture and nutrient production and its diversity is essential to improve present understanding of national food production patterns, agricultural livelihoods, and food chains, and their linkages to land use and their associated ecosystems services. Here we provide a plausible breakdown of global agricultural and nutrient production by farm size, and also study the associations between farm size, agricultural diversity, and nutrient production. This analysis is crucial to design interventions that might be appropriately targeted to promote healthy diets and ecosystems in the face of population growth, urbanisation, and climate change. METHODS: We used existing spatially-explicit global datasets to estimate the production levels of 41 major crops, seven livestock, and 14 aquaculture and fish products. From overall production estimates, we estimated the production of vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, iron, zinc, calcium, calories, and protein. We also estimated the relative contribution of farms of different sizes to the production of different agricultural commodities and associated nutrients, as well as how the diversity of food production based on the number of different products grown per geographic pixel and distribution of products within this pixel (Shannon diversity index [H]) changes with different farm sizes. FINDINGS: Globally, small and medium farms (</=50 ha) produce 51-77% of nearly all commodities and nutrients examined here. However, important regional differences exist. Large farms (>50 ha) dominate production in North America, South America, and Australia and New Zealand. In these regions, large farms contribute between 75% and 100% of all cereal, livestock, and fruit production, and the pattern is similar for other commodity groups. By contrast, small farms (</=20 ha) produce more than 75% of most food commodities in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, south Asia, and China. In Europe, west Asia and north Africa, and central America, medium-size farms (20-50 ha) also contribute substantially to the production of most food commodities. Very small farms (</=2 ha) are important and have local significance in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia, where they contribute to about 30% of most food commodities. The majority of vegetables (81%), roots and tubers (72%), pulses (67%), fruits (66%), fish and livestock products (60%), and cereals (56%) are produced in diverse landscapes (H>1.5). Similarly, the majority of global micronutrients (53-81%) and protein (57%) are also produced in more diverse agricultural landscapes (H>1.5). By contrast, the majority of sugar (73%) and oil crops (57%) are produced in less diverse ones (H</=1.5), which also account for the majority of global calorie production (56%). The diversity of agricultural and nutrient production diminishes as farm size increases. However, areas of the world with higher agricultural diversity produce more nutrients, irrespective of farm size. INTERPRETATION: Our results show that farm size and diversity of agricultural production vary substantially across regions and are key structural determinants of food and nutrient production that need to be considered in plans to meet social, economic, and environmental targets. At the global level, both small and large farms have key roles in food and nutrition security. Efforts to maintain production diversity as farm sizes increase seem to be necessary to maintain the production of diverse nutrients and viable, multifunctional, sustainable landscapes. FUNDING: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health funded by the CGIAR Fund Council, Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation, European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change-Belmont Forum.
Address International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2542-5196 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28670647 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98017
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ayash, C.; Costas-Muniz, R.; Badreddine, D.; Ramirez, J.; Gany, F.
Title An Investigation of Unmet Socio-Economic Needs Among Arab American Breast Cancer Patients Compared with Other Immigrant and Migrant Patients Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Community Health
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Arabs; Breast cancer; Immigrant health
Abstract Although Arabs are a growing population in the United States, they are a hidden minority when compared to larger, more studied groups like Latinos and Caribbean immigrants of African descent (CIAD). There is limited research pertaining to patients' unmet socioeconomic and supportive care needs when undergoing breast cancer treatment, particularly among immigrants and migrants. This is a comparative study of a nested cohort of 36 Arabs, 145 Latinos and 128 CIAD breast cancer patients participating in the Integrated Cancer Care Access Network and their areas of needed assistance. The patients were recruited from eleven community cancer clinics in New York City and through community based organizations. Patients most commonly reported needing financial, transportation, and food assistance. Arabs were more likely than their CIAD and Latino counterparts to have health insurance and legal aid needs. Arabs also has the highest proportion of patients unaware of their own cancer stage, at odds with their report of lower information needs than the other groups. Additional culturally tailored Arabic language interventions are needed to educate Arabic speaking breast cancer patients to help facilitate access to available services.
Address Arab Health Initiative, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service, 485 Lexington Avenue, 2nd floor, New York, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0094-5145 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28669006 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98018
Permanent link to this record