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Author Gravina, G.L.; Mancini, A.; Colapietro, A.; Vitale, F.; Vetuschi, A.; Pompili, S.; Rossi, G.; Marampon, F.; Richardson, P.J.; Patient, L.; Patient, L.; Burbidge, S.; Festuccia, C.
Title The novel CXCR4 antagonist, PRX177561, reduces tumor cell proliferation and accelerates cancer stem cell differentiation in glioblastoma preclinical models Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol
Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 1010428317695528
Keywords Adult; Animals; Cell Differentiation/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement/drug effects; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Chemokine CXCL12/*genetics; Disease-Free Survival; Glioblastoma/*drug therapy/genetics; Humans; Mice; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/*drug therapy/genetics/pathology; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/pathology; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*drug therapy/genetics/pathology; Receptors, CXCR4/antagonists & inhibitors/*genetics; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Tumor Microenvironment/drug effects; Cxcr4; Glioblastoma; angiogenesis; monocyte infiltration
Abstract Glioblastoma is the most frequent and the most lethal primary brain tumor among adults. Standard of care is the association of radiotherapy with concomitant or adjuvant temozolomide. However, to date, recurrence is inevitable. The CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway is upregulated in the glioblastoma tumor microenvironment regulating tumor cell proliferation, local invasion, angiogenesis, and the efficacy of radio-chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the novel CXCR4 antagonist, PRX177561, in preclinical models of glioblastoma. CXCR4 expression and PRX177561 effects were assessed on a panel of 12 human glioblastoma cells lines and 5 patient-derived glioblastoma stem cell cultures. Next, the effect of PRX177561 was tested in vivo, using subcutaneous injection of U87MG, U251, and T98G cells as well as orthotopic intrabrain inoculation of luciferase-transfected U87MG cells. Here we found that PRX177561 impairs the proliferation of human glioblastoma cell lines, increases apoptosis, and reduces CXCR4 expression and cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha in vitro. PRX177561 reduced the expression of stem cell markers and increased that of E-cadherin and glial fibrillary acidic protein in U87MG cells consistent with a reduction in cancer stem cells. In vivo, PRX177561 reduced the weight and increased the time to progression of glioblastoma subcutaneous tumors while increasing disease-free survival and overall survival of mice bearing orthotopic tumors. Our findings suggest that targeting stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha/CXCR4 axis by PRX177561 might represent a novel therapeutic approach against glioblastoma and support further investigation of this compound in more complex preclinical settings in order to determine its therapeutic potential.
Address 1 Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28639900 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96581
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Author de Sousa, J.F.; Torrieri, R.; Serafim, R.B.; Di Cristofaro, L.F.M.; Escanfella, F.D.; Ribeiro, R.; Zanette, D.L.; Paco-Larson, M.L.; da Silva, W.A.J.; Tirapelli, D.P. da C.; Neder, L.; Carlotti, C.G.J.; Valente, V.
Title Expression signatures of DNA repair genes correlate with survival prognosis of astrocytoma patients Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol
Volume 39 Issue 4 Pages 1010428317694552
Keywords Apoptosis; Astrocytoma/genetics/metabolism/*mortality; Brain Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*mortality; Cell Cycle; Cell Line, Tumor; *DNA Repair; DNA Repair Enzymes/genetics/metabolism; Exodeoxyribonucleases/genetics/metabolism; Gene Expression; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; N-Glycosyl Hydrolases/genetics/metabolism; Prognosis; DNA repair; astrocytoma; genomic instability; glioblastoma; tumor progression
Abstract Astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors. They are very resistant to therapies and usually progress rapidly to high-grade lesions. Here, we investigated the potential role of DNA repair genes in astrocytoma progression and resistance. To this aim, we performed a polymerase chain reaction array-based analysis focused on DNA repair genes and searched for correlations between expression patters and survival prognoses. We found 19 genes significantly altered. Combining these genes in all possible arrangements, we found 421 expression signatures strongly associated with poor survival. Importantly, five genes (DDB2, EXO1, NEIL3, BRCA2, and BRIP1) were independently correlated with worse prognoses, revealing single-gene signatures. Moreover, silencing of EXO1, which is remarkably overexpressed, promoted faster restoration of double-strand breaks, while NEIL3 knockdown, also highly overexpressed, caused an increment in DNA damage and cell death after irradiation of glioblastoma cells. These results disclose the importance of DNA repair pathways for the maintenance of genomic stability of high-grade astrocytomas and suggest that EXO1 and NEIL3 overexpression confers more efficiency for double-strand break repair and resistance to reactive oxygen species, respectively. Thereby, we highlight these two genes as potentially related with tumor aggressiveness and promising candidates as novel therapeutic targets.
Address 7 Center for Integrative Systems Biology (CISBi), NAP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28378638 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96598
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Author Bischof, J.; Westhoff, M.-A.; Wagner, J.E.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Trentmann, S.; Knippschild, U.; Wirtz, C.R.; Burster, T.
Title Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol
Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 1010428317692227
Keywords Animals; Autophagy; Brain Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology; Cathepsins/*metabolism; Glioblastoma/*metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/*pathology; Proteolysis; *Major histocompatibility complex class I; *autophagy; *cathepsin; *glioblastoma
Abstract One major obstacle in cancer therapy is chemoresistance leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Cancer stem cells, in particular glioblastoma stem cells, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and immune recognition. In case of immune recognition, several survival mechanisms including, regulation of autophagy, proteases, and cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, are found in glioblastoma stem cells. In different pathways, cathepsins play a crucial role in processing functional proteins that are necessary for several processes and proper cell function. Consequently, strategies targeting these pathways in glioblastoma stem cells are promising approaches to interfere with tumor cell survival and will be discussed in this review.
Address 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Surgery Center, Ulm University Medical Center, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28347245 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96600
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Author Howard, C.M.; Valluri, J.; Alberico, A.; Julien, T.; Mazagri, R.; Marsh, R.; Alastair, H.; Cortese, A.; Griswold, M.; Wang, W.; Denning, K.; Brown, L.; Claudio, P.P.
Title Analysis of Chemopredictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Patients Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Translational Oncology Abbreviated Journal Transl Oncol
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 241-254
Keywords
Abstract INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) treated with standard-of-care maximal surgical resection and concurrent adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ)/radiotherapy remains very poor (less than 15 months). GBMs have been found to contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. The highly invasive nature of high-grade gliomas and their inherent resistance to therapy lead to very high rates of recurrence. For these reasons, not all patients with similar diagnoses respond to the same chemotherapy, schedule, or dose. Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is not only costly but more importantly burdens the patient with unnecessary toxicity and selects for the development of resistant cancer cell clones. We have developed a drug response assay (ChemoID) that identifies the most effective chemotherapy against CSCs and bulk of tumor cells from of a panel of potential treatments, offering great promise for individualized cancer management. Providing the treating physician with drug response information on a panel of approved drugs will aid in personalized therapy selections of the most effective chemotherapy for individual patients, thereby improving outcomes. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of the ChemoID drug response assay in GBM patients treated with standard of care. METHODS: Forty-one GBM patients (mean age 54 years, 59% male), all eligible for a surgical biopsy, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for drug sensitivity testing. Patients were all treated with standard-of-care TMZ plus radiation with or without maximal surgery, depending on the status of the disease. Patients were prospectively monitored for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Odds ratio (OR) associations of 12-month recurrence, PFS, and OS outcomes were estimated for CSC, bulk tumor, and combined assay responses for the standard-of-care TMZ treatment; sensitivities/specificities, areas under the curve (AUCs), and risk reclassification components were examined. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-49 months). For every 5% increase in in vitro CSC cell kill by TMZ, 12-month patient response (nonrecurrence of cancer) increased two-fold, OR=2.2 (P=.016). Similar but somewhat less supported associations with the bulk tumor test were seen, OR=2.75 (P=.07) for each 5% bulk tumor cell kill by TMZ. Combining CSC and bulk tumor assay results in a single model yielded a statistically supported CSC association, OR=2.36 (P=.036), but a much attenuated remaining bulk tumor association, OR=1.46 (P=.472). AUCs and [sensitivity/specificity] at optimal outpoints (>40% CSC cell kill and >55% bulk tumor cell kill) were AUC=0.989 [sensitivity=100/specificity=97], 0.972 [100/89], and 0.989 [100/97] for the CSC only, bulk tumor only, and combined models, respectively. Risk categorization of patients was improved by 11% when using the CSC test in conjunction with the bulk test (risk reclassification nonevent net reclassification improvement [NRI] and overall NRI=0.111, P=.030). Median recurrence time was 20 months for patients with a positive (>40% cell kill) CSC test versus only 3 months for those with a negative CSC test, whereas median recurrence time was 13 months versus 4 months for patients with a positive (>55% cell kill) bulk test versus negative. Similar favorable results for the CSC test were observed for PFS and OS outcomes. Panel results across 14 potential other treatments indicated that 34/41 (83%) potentially more optimal alternative therapies may have been chosen using CSC results, whereas 27/41 (66%) alternative therapies may have been chosen using bulk tumor results. CONCLUSIONS: The ChemoID CSC drug response assay has the potential to increase the accuracy of bulk tumor assays to help guide individualized chemotherapy choices. GBM cancer recurrence may occur quickly if the CSC test has a low in vitro cell kill rate even if the bulk tumor test cell kill rate is high.
Address Department of BioMolecular Sciences, National Center for Natural Products Research, University of Mississippi, University, MS; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center Cancer Institute, Jackson, MS 39216. Electronic address: pclaudio@olemiss.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1936-5233 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28199863 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96608
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Author Loza-Correa, M.; Kou, Y.; Taha, M.; Kalab, M.; Ronholm, J.; Schlievert, P.M.; Cahill, M.P.; Skeate, R.; Cserti-Gazdewich, C.; Ramirez-Arcos, S.
Title Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Transfusion Abbreviated Journal Transfusion
Volume 57 Issue 5 Pages 1299-1303
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy; Platelet Transfusion/*adverse effects; Sepsis/*etiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*transmission; *Staphylococcus aureus; Transfusion Reaction/*microbiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. CASE REPORT: This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. DISCUSSION: As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. CONCLUSION: Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units.
Address Canadian Blood Services
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0041-1132 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28205241 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99087
Permanent link to this record