toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Piovezan, R.D.; Hirotsu, C.; Feres, M.C.; Cintra, F.D.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Poyares, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obstructive sleep apnea and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of serum vitamin D deficiency Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0180901  
  Keywords Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Humans; Hypertension/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity/physiopathology; Polysomnography; Risk Factors; Sedentary Lifestyle; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep/physiology; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Sleep Wake Disorders/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology; Smoking/physiopathology; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vitamin D/*blood; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications/ethnology/physiopathology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies demonstrate an association between vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and sleep disturbances, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration. However, to date, no studies have concurrently and objectively evaluated the effect of these factors on 25(OH)D. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether OSA and objective short sleep duration are independently associated with reduced 25(OH)D in an adult population sample. METHODS: A cross-sectional study included 657 individuals from the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, as part of the ERA project. Participants fulfilled questionnaires and underwent clinical evaluation, polysomnography and blood sample collection for 25(OH)D quantification. OSA was classified into three categories (mild, moderate and severe). The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was considered as levels<30 ng/mL. Short sleep duration was defined as total sleep time<6 hours. RESULTS: The risk of 25(OH)D deficiency was observed in 59.5% of the sample, affecting more individuals of the female gender, obese, with African American ethnicity, and those that were smokers, sedentary and presented hypertension and diabetes. In the final logistic model adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, obesity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, seasonality and creatinine serum levels, both OSA and short sleep duration showed significant independent associations with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency (moderate OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.35-3.64, p<0.01; severe OSA: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.06-3.00, p = 0.03; short sleep duration: OR for 25(OH)D<30 = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.15-2.26, p = 0.01). After a subgroup analysis, similar results were observed only in participants >/=50 years. CONCLUSION: OSA and short sleep duration are independently associated with the risk of 25(OH)D deficiency in an adult population. Age-related changes in vitamin D metabolism and the frequency of sleep disorders may be involved in these associations. Future studies exploring whether 25(OH)D levels may modulate OSA and sleep curtailment-related outcomes are needed.  
  Address Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28686746 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98016  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hudgins, J.D.; Goldberg, V.; Fell, G.L.; Puder, M.; Eisenberg, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing Time to Antibiotics in Children With Intestinal Failure, Central Venous Line, and Fever Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Pediatrics  
  Volume 140 Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage; Bacteremia/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Female; Fever/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Humans; Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Length of Stay/*trends; Male; Short Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Time-to-Treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Children with intestinal failure (IF) on parenteral nutrition (PN) are at high risk for bacteremia, and delays in antibiotic administration have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We designed an emergency department (ED) quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce time to administration of intravenous antibiotics in febrile children with IF on PN. METHODS: Our aim was to decrease the mean time for febrile children with IF on PN to receive intravenous antibiotics by 50% to <60 minutes over a 12-month period. Secondary outcome measures were ED, hospital, and ICU length of stay (LOS). Our process measure was the rate of ordering recommended antibiotics, and our balancing measure was the rate of hypoglycemia. Interventions included increasing provider knowledge of IF, streamlining order entry, providing individualized feedback, and standardizing the triage process. Results were analyzed by using statistical process control methodology and time series analysis. RESULTS: We identified 149 eligible ED patients, of which 62 (41.6%) had bacteremia. The mean time to antibiotics decreased after the onset of the QI initiative from 112 to 39 minutes, and the ED LOS decreased from 286 to 247 minutes, but the total length of hospital and ICU stays were unchanged. The rate of hypoglycemia was also unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Our QI intervention for febrile children with IF on PN shortened the time to receive antibiotics. Larger studies are needed to demonstrate the impact on overall LOS and mortality.  
  Address Division of Emergency Medicine and  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-4005 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29066581 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98935  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hudgins, J.D.; Goldberg, V.; Fell, G.L.; Puder, M.; Eisenberg, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing Time to Antibiotics in Children With Intestinal Failure, Central Venous Line, and Fever Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Pediatrics  
  Volume 140 Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage; Bacteremia/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Female; Fever/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Humans; Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy/epidemiology; Length of Stay/*trends; Male; Short Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis/*drug therapy/*epidemiology; Time-to-Treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Children with intestinal failure (IF) on parenteral nutrition (PN) are at high risk for bacteremia, and delays in antibiotic administration have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We designed an emergency department (ED) quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce time to administration of intravenous antibiotics in febrile children with IF on PN. METHODS: Our aim was to decrease the mean time for febrile children with IF on PN to receive intravenous antibiotics by 50% to <60 minutes over a 12-month period. Secondary outcome measures were ED, hospital, and ICU length of stay (LOS). Our process measure was the rate of ordering recommended antibiotics, and our balancing measure was the rate of hypoglycemia. Interventions included increasing provider knowledge of IF, streamlining order entry, providing individualized feedback, and standardizing the triage process. Results were analyzed by using statistical process control methodology and time series analysis. RESULTS: We identified 149 eligible ED patients, of which 62 (41.6%) had bacteremia. The mean time to antibiotics decreased after the onset of the QI initiative from 112 to 39 minutes, and the ED LOS decreased from 286 to 247 minutes, but the total length of hospital and ICU stays were unchanged. The rate of hypoglycemia was also unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Our QI intervention for febrile children with IF on PN shortened the time to receive antibiotics. Larger studies are needed to demonstrate the impact on overall LOS and mortality.  
  Address Division of Emergency Medicine and  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-4005 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29066581 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99965  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rogers, A.E.J.; Eisenman, K.M.; Dolan, S.A.; Belderson, K.M.; Zauche, J.R.; Tong, S.; Gralla, J.; Hilden, J.M.; Wang, M.; Maloney, K.W.; Dominguez, S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors for bacteremia and central line-associated blood stream infections in children with acute myelogenous leukemia: A single-institution report Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Pediatric Blood & Cancer Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Blood Cancer  
  Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Adolescent; Bacteremia/*etiology; Bacteria/isolation & purification; Case-Control Studies; Catheter-Related Infections/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection/*etiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*complications/microbiology; Male; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Clabsi; acute myelogenous leukemia; bacteremia; pediatric oncology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) are a source of high morbidity and mortality in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). PROCEDURE: To understand the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the development of CLABSI in children with AML. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with AML over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011 at the Children's Hospital Colorado. Cases and controls were classified on the basis of the presence of a CLABSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network. RESULTS: Of 40 patients in the study, 25 (62.5%) developed at least one CLABSI during therapy. The majority of CLABSIs were due to oral or gastrointestinal organisms (83.0%). Skin organisms accounted for 8.5%. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest risk factors associated with CLABSI were diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-28.7), receipt of blood products in the preceding 4-7 days (OR 10.0, 95%CI 3.2-31.0), not receiving antibiotics (OR 8.3, 95%CI 2.8-25.0), and chemotherapy cycle (OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-8.9). CLABSIs led to increased morbidity, with 13 cases (32.5%) versus two controls (1.9%) requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Three (7.5%) of 40 CLABSI events resulted in or contributed to death. CONCLUSIONS: Intensified line care efforts cannot eliminate all CLABSIs in the patients with AML. Exploring the role of mucosal barrier breakdown and/or the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective strategies for further prevention of CLABSIs, supporting ongoing trials in this patient population.  
  Address Department of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1545-5009 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27616655 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99291  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rogers, A.E.J.; Eisenman, K.M.; Dolan, S.A.; Belderson, K.M.; Zauche, J.R.; Tong, S.; Gralla, J.; Hilden, J.M.; Wang, M.; Maloney, K.W.; Dominguez, S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors for bacteremia and central line-associated blood stream infections in children with acute myelogenous leukemia: A single-institution report Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Pediatric Blood & Cancer Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Blood Cancer  
  Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Adolescent; Bacteremia/*etiology; Bacteria/isolation & purification; Case-Control Studies; Catheter-Related Infections/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection/*etiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*complications/microbiology; Male; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Clabsi; acute myelogenous leukemia; bacteremia; pediatric oncology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) are a source of high morbidity and mortality in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). PROCEDURE: To understand the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the development of CLABSI in children with AML. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with AML over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011 at the Children's Hospital Colorado. Cases and controls were classified on the basis of the presence of a CLABSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network. RESULTS: Of 40 patients in the study, 25 (62.5%) developed at least one CLABSI during therapy. The majority of CLABSIs were due to oral or gastrointestinal organisms (83.0%). Skin organisms accounted for 8.5%. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest risk factors associated with CLABSI were diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-28.7), receipt of blood products in the preceding 4-7 days (OR 10.0, 95%CI 3.2-31.0), not receiving antibiotics (OR 8.3, 95%CI 2.8-25.0), and chemotherapy cycle (OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-8.9). CLABSIs led to increased morbidity, with 13 cases (32.5%) versus two controls (1.9%) requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Three (7.5%) of 40 CLABSI events resulted in or contributed to death. CONCLUSIONS: Intensified line care efforts cannot eliminate all CLABSIs in the patients with AML. Exploring the role of mucosal barrier breakdown and/or the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective strategies for further prevention of CLABSIs, supporting ongoing trials in this patient population.  
  Address Department of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1545-5009 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27616655 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100321  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: