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Author Celiku, O.; Tandle, A.; Chung, J.-Y.; Hewitt, S.M.; Camphausen, K.; Shankavaram, U.
Title Computational analysis of the mesenchymal signature landscape in gliomas Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) BMC Medical Genomics Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Genomics
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 13
Keywords Cd44; Computational modeling; Epithelial to mesenchymal transition; Glioma
Abstract BACKGROUND: Epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and mimicking processes, contribute to cancer invasion and metastasis, and are known to be responsible for resistance to various therapeutic agents in many cancers. While a number of studies have proposed molecular signatures that characterize the spectrum of such transition, more work is needed to understand how the mesenchymal signature (MS) is regulated in non-epithelial cancers like gliomas, to identify markers with the most prognostic significance, and potential for therapeutic targeting. RESULTS: Computational analysis of 275 glioma samples from “The Cancer Genome Atlas” was used to identify the regulatory changes between low grade gliomas with little expression of MS, and high grade glioblastomas with high expression of MS. TF (transcription factor)-gene regulatory networks were constructed for each of the cohorts, and 5 major pathways and 118 transcription factors were identified as involved in the differential regulation of the networks. The most significant pathway – Extracellular matrix organization – was further analyzed for prognostic relevance. A 20-gene signature was identified as having prognostic significance (HR (hazard ratio) 3.2, 95% CI (confidence interval) = 1.53-8.33), after controlling for known prognostic factors (age, and glioma grade). The signature's significance was validated in an independent data set. The putative stem cell marker CD44 was biologically validated in glioma cell lines and brain tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the differences between low grade gliomas and high grade glioblastoma are associated with differential expression of the signature genes, raising the possibility that targeting these genes might prolong survival in glioma patients.
Address Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 10 Center Drive, Bldg. 10, Rm. B3B70, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. uma@mail.nih.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-8794 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28279210 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96602
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Author Harling, G.; Lima Neto, A.S.; Sousa, G.S.; Machado, M.M.T.; Castro, M.C.
Title Determinants of tuberculosis transmission and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 508
Keywords Brazil; Epidemiology; Fortaleza; Social determinants; Spatial analysis; Treatment; Treatment failure; Tuberculosis
Abstract BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem, despite recent achievements in reducing incidence and mortality rates. In Brazil, these achievements were above the worldwide average, but marked by large regional heterogeneities. In Fortaleza (5th largest city in Brazil), the tuberculosis cure rate has been declining and treatment abandonment has been increasing in the past decade, despite a reduction in incidence and an increase in directly observed therapy (DOT). These trends put efforts to eliminate tuberculosis at risk. We therefore sought to determine social and programmatic determinants of tuberculosis incidence and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza. METHODS: We analyzed sociodemographic and clinical data for all new tuberculosis cases notified in the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) from Fortaleza between 2007 and 2014. We calculated incidence rates for 117 neighborhoods in Fortaleza, assessed their spatial clustering, and used spatial regression models to quantify associations between neighborhood-level covariates and incidence rates. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to evaluate how individual- and neighborhood-level covariates predicted tuberculosis treatment abandonment. RESULTS: There were 12,338 new cases reported during the study period. Case rates across neighborhoods were significantly positively clustered in two low-income areas close to the city center. In an adjusted model, tuberculosis rates were significantly higher in neighborhoods with lower literacy, higher sewerage access and homicide rates, and a greater proportion of self-reported black residents. Treatment was abandoned in 1901 cases (15.4%), a rate that rose by 71% between 2007 and 2014. Abandonment was significantly associated with many individual sociodemographic and clinical factors. Notably, being recommended for DOT was protective for those who completed DOT, but associated with abandonment for those who did not. CONCLUSION: Low socioeconomic status areas have higher tuberculosis rates, and low socioeconomic individuals have higher risk of treatment abandonment, in Fortaleza. Treatment abandonment rates are growing despite the advent of universal DOT recommendations in Brazil. Proactive social policies, and active contact tracing to find missed cases, may help reduce the tuberculosis burden in this setting.
Address Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Building I, Room 1113, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. mcastro@hsph.harvard.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28545423 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97635
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Author Coll, C. de V.N.; Domingues, M.R.; Hallal, P.C.; da Silva, I.C.M.; Bassani, D.G.; Matijasevich, A.; Barros, A.; Santos, I.S.; Bertoldi, A.D.
Title Changes in leisure-time physical activity among Brazilian pregnant women: comparison between two birth cohort studies (2004 – 2015) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 119
Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Brazil; Cohort Studies; *Exercise; Female; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Maternal Age; Mothers/*statistics & numerical data; Obesity/complications; Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications/etiology/*prevention & control; Pregnancy Trimesters/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult; Birth cohort studies; Exercise; Motor activity; Physical activity; Pregnancy; Recommendations; Surveillance
Abstract BACKGROUND: Low levels of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) during pregnancy have been shown in studies conducted worldwide. Surveillance is extremely important to monitor the progress of physical activity patterns over time and set goals for effective interventions to decrease inactivity among pregnant women. The aim of this study was to evaluate time changes in LTPA among Brazilian pregnant women in an 11-year period (2004-2015) by comparing data from two birth cohort studies. METHODS: Two population-based birth cohort studies were carried out in the city of Pelotas, southern Brazil, in 2004 and 2015. A total of 4244 and 4271 mothers were interviewed after delivery. Weekly frequency and duration of each session of LTPA in a typical week were reported for the pre-pregnancy period and for each trimester of pregnancy. Trends in both recommended LTPA (>/=150 min/week) and any LTPA (regardless of weekly amount) were analysed overtime. Changes were also calculated separately for subgroups of maternal age, schooling, family income, parity, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pre-pregnancy LTPA. RESULTS: The proportion of women engaged in recommended levels of LTPA pre-pregnancy increased from 11.2% (95%CI 10.0-12.2) in 2004 to 15.8% (95%CI 14.6-16.9) in 2015. During pregnancy, no changes were observed over the period for the first (10.6 to 10.9%) and second (8.7 to 7.9%) trimesters, whereas there was a decrease from 3.4% (95%CI 2.9-4.0) to 2.4% (95%CI 1.9-2.8) in the last trimester. Major decreases in LTPA in the last trimester were observed among women who were younger, with intermediate to high income, high schooling, primiparous, pre-pregnancy obese and, engaged in LTPA before pregnancy. Changes in any LTPA practice followed the same patterns described for recommended LTPA. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the increase in the proportion of women engaged in LTPA before pregnancy between 2004 and 2005, LTPA levels remained stable during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and declined during the third gestational trimester over the period. Interventions to encourage the maintenance of LTPA practice throughout pregnancy are urgently needed.
Address Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28122524 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98029
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Author Gragnani, A.; de Oliveira, A.F.; Boro, D.; Pham, T.N.; Ferreira, L.M.
Title Response and legislative changes after the Kiss nightclub tragedy in Santa Maria/RS/Brazil: Learning from a large-scale burn disaster Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Abbreviated Journal Burns
Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 343-349
Keywords Brazil/epidemiology; Burns/epidemiology/*prevention & control; Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/epidemiology; Crowding; Disasters/*prevention & control; Fires/legislation & jurisprudence/*prevention & control; Humans; Hydrolases/poisoning; Mass Casualty Incidents/*prevention & control/statistics & numerical data; *Public Policy; Retrospective Studies; Safety/*legislation & jurisprudence; Smoke Inhalation Injury/epidemiology; Burn disaster; Fire prevention and protection; Kiss nightclub; Legislation; Mass casualty incident; Santa Maria
Abstract PURPOSE: A major fire occurred on January 27, 2013, at 02:30 at Kiss nightclub in the city of Santa Maria, State of Rio Grande do Sul, in Southern Brazil. In this retrospective report, we aimed to describe the nightclub fire event, its immediate consequences, and evaluated its impact on legislation. Our objective was to disseminate the lessons we learned from this large-scale nightclub fire disaster. METHODS: We conducted a literature review in PubMed and Lilacs database from 2013 to 2015 related to the nightclub Kiss, Santa Maria, fire, burns, and similar events worldwide over the past 15 years. We searched in the general press and online media information sites, and seeking legislation about this topic at the federal level in Brazil. We reported on the legislation changes that resulted from this nightclub fire. RESULTS: Current federal legislation on fire prevention and the scope of public safety, including night clubs and discos, states is the duty of the state and everyone's responsibility, pursuant to Article 144 of the Federal Constitution of Brazil. Thus, the federal union, individual states and municipalities have the power to legislate on fire prevention, and especially to ensure the security of the population. A state law called “Law Kiss”, was passed in 2014, establishing standards on safety, prevention and protection against fire in buildings and areas of fire risk in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. On a national level, a law of prevention and fire fighting in Brazil was also drafted after the Santa Maria disaster (Law project no. 4923, 2013). Currently, this bill is still awaiting sanction before it can take effect. CONCLUSION: As we push for enactment of the national law of prevention and fire fighting in Brazil, we will continue emphasizing fire prevention, fire protection, fire fighting, means of escape and proper management. All similar events in this and other countries remind us that similar tragedies may occur anywhere, and that the analysis of facts, previous mistakes, during and after the incident are crucial to our understanding, and will help us lessen the chance of future occurrences.
Address Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0305-4179 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27663506 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97661
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Author Ramirez-Blanco, C.E.; Ramirez-Rivero, C.E.; Diaz-Martinez, L.A.; Sosa-Avila, L.M.
Title Infection in burn patients in a referral center in Colombia Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Abbreviated Journal Burns
Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 642-653
Keywords Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Acinetobacter baumannii; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Burns/*epidemiology; Catheter-Related Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Cephalosporins/therapeutic use; Child; Child, Preschool; Colombia/epidemiology; Drug Resistance, Microbial; Escherichia coli; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Folliculitis/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Male; Middle Aged; Oxacillin/therapeutic use; Pneumonia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Wound Infection/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Young Adult; Burn wound infection; Burns; Health care related infection; Nosocomial infection; Pneumonia; Urinary tract infection
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, burns are responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually; infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early identification and treatment of infection improves outcome. Toward this end it's necessary to identify the institutions flora and organisms that most frequently produces infection. OBJECTIVES: To characterize infections developed by burn patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Santander (HUS). METHODOLOGY: Burn patients hospitalized in the HUS from January 1 to December 2014 were followed. Medical information regarding infections, laboratory and pathology reports were obtained. Statistical analysis with measures of central tendency, proportions, global and specific incidence density plus overall and specific incidence was obtained. For the microbiological profile proportions were established. RESULTS: 402 burn patients were included, 234 (58.2%) men and 168 (41.8%) women, aged between 6 days and 83 years, median 12.5 years. The burn agents include scald (52.5%), fire (10.0%), gasoline (9.2%), electricity (7.5%), among others. Burn area ranged from 1% to 80% TBS. Cumulative mortality was 1.5%. 27.8% of burned patients had one or more infections. Identified infections include folliculitis (27.0%), urinary tract infection (19.0%), infection of the burn wound (10.4%), pneumonia (8.6%), Central venous catheter (7.4%), bloodstream infection (7.4%) and skin grafts infection (4.3%) among others. Bacteria were responsible for 88.5% of the cases and fungi 11.5%. The most frequently isolated germs were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, E. coli, S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Most gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to Amikacin, gram positive bacteria were sensitive to multiple antibiotics. CONCLUSION: Burns is a severe trauma that occurs in adult and pediatric patients, has several causative agents and can compromise the patient's life. The burned patient is at risk for a variety of infections. According to the type of infection it is possible to infer the most common causative organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity/resistance which allow a directed early empiric treatment.
Address University Hospital of Santander, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia. Electronic address: lumisosa@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0305-4179 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28185802 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99267
Permanent link to this record