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Author Corburn, J.; Sverdlik, A.
Title Slum Upgrading and Health Equity Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Africa; Asia; Climate Change; Employment; Environmental Health; *Health Equity; Housing; Humans; Latin America; *Poverty Areas; Socioeconomic Factors; Urban Health; Urban Population; climate change adaptation; health equity; health in all policies; housing; participation; slum upgrading; slums; social determinants of health; sustainable development goals
Abstract Informal settlement upgrading is widely recognized for enhancing shelter and promoting economic development, yet its potential to improve health equity is usually overlooked. Almost one in seven people on the planet are expected to reside in urban informal settlements, or slums, by 2030. Slum upgrading is the process of delivering place-based environmental and social improvements to the urban poor, including land tenure, housing, infrastructure, employment, health services and political and social inclusion. The processes and products of slum upgrading can address multiple environmental determinants of health. This paper reviewed urban slum upgrading evaluations from cities across Asia, Africa and Latin America and found that few captured the multiple health benefits of upgrading. With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focused on improving well-being for billions of city-dwellers, slum upgrading should be viewed as a key strategy to promote health, equitable development and reduce climate change vulnerabilities. We conclude with suggestions for how slum upgrading might more explicitly capture its health benefits, such as through the use of health impact assessment (HIA) and adopting an urban health in all policies (HiAP) framework. Urban slum upgrading must be more explicitly designed, implemented and evaluated to capture its multiple global environmental health benefits.
Address Department of City and Regional Planning & School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. sverdlik@berkeley.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28338613 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97642
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Author Heydari, N.; Larsen, D.A.; Neira, M.; Beltran Ayala, E.; Fernandez, P.; Adrian, J.; Rochford, R.; Stewart-Ibarra, A.M.
Title Household Dengue Prevention Interventions, Expenditures, and Barriers to Aedes aegypti Control in Machala, Ecuador Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Aedes/*growth & development; Animals; Dengue/epidemiology/*prevention & control; Ecuador/epidemiology; Housing; Humans; Insect Vectors/*virology; Insecticides/*economics; Mosquito Control/*economics/*methods; Mosquito Nets/*economics; Socioeconomic Factors; Aedes aegypti; Ecuador; Kap; dengue fever; economic cost; mosquito control
Abstract The Aedes aegypti mosquito is an efficient vector for the transmission of Zika, chikungunya, and dengue viruses, causing major epidemics and a significant social and economic burden throughout the tropics and subtropics. The primary means of preventing these diseases is household-level mosquito control. However, relatively little is known about the economic burden of Ae. aegypti control in resource-limited communities. We surveyed residents from 40 households in a high-risk community at the urban periphery in the city of Machala, Ecuador, on dengue perceptions, vector control interventions, household expenditures, and factors influencing purchasing decisions. The results of this study show that households spend a monthly median of US$2.00, or 1.90% (range: 0.00%, 9.21%) of their family income on Ae. aegypti control interventions. Households reported employing, on average, five different mosquito control and dengue prevention interventions, including aerosols, liquid sprays, repellents, mosquito coils, and unimpregnated bed nets. We found that effectiveness and cost were the most important factors that influence people's decisions to purchase a mosquito control product. Our findings will inform the development and deployment of new Ae. aegypti control interventions by the public health and private sectors, and add to prior studies that have focused on the economic burden of dengue-like illness.
Address Center for Global Health and Translational Science, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA. amstew01@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28212349 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97645
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Author Florindo, A.A.; Barrozo, L.V.; Cabral-Miranda, W.; Rodrigues, E.Q.; Turrell, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Cesar, C.L.G.; Giles-Corti, B.
Title Public Open Spaces and Leisure-Time Walking in Brazilian Adults Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Bicycling; Brazil; Child; Cities; City Planning; Cluster Analysis; Demography; Environment Design; Family Characteristics; Female; Geographic Information Systems; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Parks, Recreational; Residence Characteristics/*statistics & numerical data; Surveys and Questionnaires; Walking/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult; Brazil; adults; built environment; leisure-time walking; public open spaces
Abstract Access to public open space is important to increase leisure-time walking (LTW) in high-income countries, but there is little evidence in middle-income countries. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to examine the relationship between LTW and the presence of different public open spaces (parks, bike paths, and squares) and the mix of these recreational destinations near the homes of adults participating in the Sao Paulo Health Survey (n = 3145). LTW was evaluated by a questionnaire. We delineated buffers (500, 1000, and 1500 m) from the geographic coordinates of the adults' residential addresses using a geographic information system. We used multilevel logistic regression taking account of clustering by census tracts and households, and with adjustment for social, demographics, and health characteristics. The main results showed that the presence of at least two recreational destinations within a 500-m buffer of participants' homes were associated with an increased odds of LTW compared with no destinations present (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.09-2.55). No associations were found for destinations further away. These results support actions outlined in the new urban plan for Sao Paulo city and could be used to highlight the importance access to a mix of public open spaces to promote physical activity in megacities of middle-income countries.
Address Adjunct, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia. billie.giles-corti@rmit.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28545242 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98023
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Author Magrath, J.W.; Kim, Y.
Title Salinomycin's potential to eliminate glioblastoma stem cells and treat glioblastoma multiforme (Review) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Oncology Abbreviated Journal Int J Oncol
Volume 51 Issue 3 Pages 753-759
Keywords
Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest form of primary brain tumor. Despite treatment with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with the drug temozolomide, the expected survival after diagnosis remains low. The median survival is only 14.6 months and the two-year survival is a mere 30%. One reason for this is the heterogeneity of GBM including the presence of glioblastoma cancer stem cells (GSCs). GSCs are a subset of cells with the unique ability to proliferate, differentiate, and create tumors. GSCs are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and thought to play an important role in recurrence. In order to effectively treat GBM, a drug must be identified that can kill GSCs. The ionophore salinomycin has been shown to kill cancer stem cells and is therefore a promising future treatment for GBM. This study focuses on salinomycin's potential to treat GBM including its ability to reduce the CSC population, its toxicity to normal brain cells, its mechanism of action, and its potential for combination treatment.
Address Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0203, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1019-6439 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28766685 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96573
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Author Miranda, A.; Blanco-Prieto, M.; Sousa, J.; Pais, A.; Vitorino, C.
Title Breaching barriers in glioblastoma. Part I: Molecular pathways and novel treatment approaches Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Pharmaceutics Abbreviated Journal Int J Pharm
Volume 531 Issue 1 Pages 372-388
Keywords Glioblastoma; Molecular mechanisms; Temozolomide; Therapeutic advances; Therapeutic resistance
Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour, and the most aggressive in nature. The prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor, with a median survival time of only 1-2 years. The treatment failure relies on the development of resistance by tumour cells and the difficulty of ensuring that drugs effectively cross the dual blood brain barrier/blood brain tumour barrier. The advanced molecular and genetic knowledge has allowed to identify the mechanisms responsible for temozolomide resistance, which represents the standard of care in GBM, along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Such resistance has motivated the researchers to investigate new avenues for GBM treatment intended to improve patient survival. In this review, we provide an overview of major obstacles to effective treatment of GBM, encompassing biological barriers, cancer stem cells, DNA repair mechanisms, deregulated signalling pathways and autophagy. New insights and potential therapy approaches for GBM are also discussed, emphasizing localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain, immunotherapy, gene therapy and nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery.
Address Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Pharmacometrics Group of the Centre for Neurosciences and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address: csvitorino@ff.uc.pt
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-5173 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28755993 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96574
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