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Author Corvalan, C.; Garmendia, M.L.; Jones-Smith, J.; Lutter, C.K.; Miranda, J.J.; Pedraza, L.S.; Popkin, B.M.; Ramirez-Zea, M.; Salvo, D.; Stein, A.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nutrition status of children in Latin America Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity Abbreviated Journal Obes Rev  
  Volume 18 Suppl 2 Issue Pages 7-18  
  Keywords Latin America; childhood obesity; children; nutrition and physical activity situation  
  Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Across the region, children face a dual burden of undernutrition and excess weight. While efforts to address undernutrition have made marked improvements, childhood obesity is on the rise as a result of diets that favour energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle. Over the last decade, changes in socioeconomic conditions, urbanization, retail foods and public transportation have all contributed to childhood obesity in the region. Additional research and research capacity are needed to address this growing epidemic, particularly with respect to designing, implementing and evaluating the impact of evidence-based obesity prevention interventions.  
  Address Hubert Department of Global Health of the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1467-7881 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28741907 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 98012  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Derose, K.P.; Payan, D.D.; Fulcar, M.A.; Terrero, S.; Acevedo, R.; Farias, H.; Palar, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181568  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Domestic Violence; Dominican Republic/epidemiology; Female; *Food Supply; HIV/isolation & purification; HIV Infections/*epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Qualitative Research; Social Stigma; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. METHODS: We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. RESULTS: Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the rights of people living with HIV, reduce HIV-related stigma, and improve gender equality.  
  Address Division of HIV, ID and Global Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28742870 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 98011  
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Author Ferreira, A.A.; Souza-Filho, Z.A.; Goncalves, M.J.F.; Santos, J.; Pierin, A.M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between alcohol drinking and arterial hypertension in indigenous people of the Mura ethnics, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages e0182352  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Brazil/epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Hypertension/epidemiology/*etiology; Male; Middle Aged; Population Groups/*statistics & numerical data; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Smoking/*adverse effects; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify the consumption of alcoholic beverage and the relation with hypertension, their prevalence and associated factors, in indigenous Mura, Brazil. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with 455 adult indigenous aged 18 years or more of Mura ethnics in Amazonia, Brazil. Interview was conducted and the alcohol intake was assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Blood pressure was measured in three measurements and the mean of the last two measurements was used. Physical examination included the following data: weight, height, waist and neck circumference, bioimpedance, and capillary measurement of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Through multivariate Logistic regression in stepwise, the odds ratios for alcohol consumption and associated factors were identified. RESULTS: The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was 40.2%, with no significant difference for hypertension in those who drink (23.0%) and those who did not drink (29.0%). Referred hypertension in indigenous was associated to less use of alcoholic beverages (14.2% vs 24.3%, P = 0.009). After an adjusted analysis (Odds Ratio, 95% CI), there was a positive association between alcoholic drink intake and male sex (10.27, CI: 5.76-18.30), smoking (4.72, CI: 2.35-9.46) and live in rural areas (9.77, CI: 5.08-18.79). On the other hand, age (0.95, IC: 0.94-0.97), and absence of dyslipidemia (0.41, CI: 0.19-0.89) were associated to lower alcohol consumption. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was high and associated with referred hypertension, but this association was not maintained after adjusted analysis. Changes to habits and inappropriate lifestyles in indigenous populations and living in urban areas may contribute to increase risk for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, health policies should be implemented to meet the uniqueness of indigenous people.  
  Address Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28777805 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 98010  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Blitchtein-Winicki, D.; Zevallos, K.; Samolski, M.R.; Requena, D.; Velarde, C.; Briceno, P.; Piazza, M.; Ybarra, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Feasibility and Acceptability of a Text Message-Based Smoking Cessation Program for Young Adults in Lima, Peru: Pilot Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication JMIR MHealth and UHealth Abbreviated Journal JMIR Mhealth Uhealth  
  Volume 5 Issue 8 Pages e116  
  Keywords Pilot Projects, Text Messaging, Smoking Cessation, Young Adult, Cognitive Therapy, Feasibility Studies, Latinos  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In Peru's urban communities, tobacco smoking generally starts during adolescence and smoking prevalence is highest among young adults. Each year, many attempt to quit, but access to smoking cessation programs is limited. Evidence-based text messaging smoking cessation programs are an alternative that has been successfully implemented in high-income countries, but not yet in middle- and low-income countries with limited tobacco control policies. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an short message service (SMS) text message-based cognitive behavioral smoking cessation program for young adults in Lima, Peru. METHODS: Recruitment included using flyers and social media ads to direct young adults interested in quitting smoking to a website where interested participants completed a Google Drive survey. Inclusion criteria were being between ages 18 and 25 years, smoking at least four cigarettes per day at least 6 days per week, willing to quit in the next 30 days, owning a mobile phone, using SMS text messaging at least once in past year, and residing in Lima. Participants joined one of three phases: (1) focus groups and in-depth interviews whose feedback was used to develop the SMS text messages, (2) validating the SMS text messages, and (3) a pilot of the SMS text message-based smoking cessation program to test its feasibility and acceptability among young adults in Lima. The outcome measures included adherence to the SMS text message-based program, acceptability of content, and smoking abstinence self-report on days 2, 7, and 30 after quitting. RESULTS: Of 639 participants who completed initial online surveys, 42 met the inclusion criteria and 35 agreed to participate (focus groups and interviews: n=12; validate SMS text messages: n=8; program pilot: n=15). Common quit practices and beliefs emerged from participants in the focus groups and interviews informed the content, tone, and delivery schedule of the messages used in the SMS text message smoking cessation program. A small randomized controlled pilot trial was performed to test the program's feasibility and acceptability; nine smokers were assigned to the SMS text message smoking cessation program and six to a SMS text message nutrition program. Participant retention was high: 93% (14/15) remained until day 30 after quit day. In all, 56% of participants (5/9) in the SMS text message smoking cessation program reported remaining smoke-free until day 30 after quit day and 17% of participants (1/6) in the SMS text message nutrition program reported remaining smoke-free during the entire program. The 14 participants who completed the pilot reported that they received valuable health information and approved the delivery schedule of the SMS text messages. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides initial evidence that a SMS text message smoking cessation program is feasible and acceptable for young adults residing in Lima.  
  Address Center for Innovative Public Health Research, San Clemente, CA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2291-5222 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28778850 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 98009  
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Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 98008  
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