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Author Castillo, M.E.; Molina, J.R.; Rodriguez Y Silva, F.; Garcia-Chevesich, P.; Garfias, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A system to evaluate fire impacts from simulated fire behavior in Mediterranean areas of Central Chile Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 579 Issue Pages 1410-1418  
  Keywords Wildfire behavior; Wildfire intensity; Wildfire simulation  
  Abstract Wildfires constitute the greatest economic disruption to Mediterranean ecosystems, from a socio-economic and ecological perspective (Molina et al., 2014). This study proposes to classify fire intensity levels based on potential fire behavior in different types of Mediterranean vegetation types, using two geographical scales. The study considered >4 thousand wildfires over a period of 25years, identifying fire behavior on each event, based on simulations using “KITRAL”, a model developed in Chile in 1993 and currently used in the entire country. Fire intensity values allowed results to be classified into six fire effects categories (levels), each of them with field indicators linking energy values with damage related to burned vegetation and wildland urban interface zone. These indicators also facilitated a preliminary assessment of wildfire impact on different Mediterranean land uses and, are therefore, a useful tool to prioritize future interventions.  
  Address International Hydrology Research Group, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Nature Conservancy, University of Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27923572 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 97511  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villalobos, A.M.; Barraza, F.; Jorquera, H.; Schauer, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wood burning pollution in southern Chile: PM2.5 source apportionment using CMB and molecular markers Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 225 Issue Pages 514-523  
  Keywords Aerosols/analysis; Air Pollutants/*analysis; Chile; Cities; Coal; Dust; *Environmental Monitoring; Fires; Heating; Nitrates/analysis; Particulate Matter/*analysis; Seasons; Smoke; Sulfates/analysis; Wood/chemistry; Cmb-Mm; Fuel poverty; Source apportionment; Southern Chile; Sustainable urban development; Wood burning  
  Abstract Temuco is a mid-size city representative of severe wood smoke pollution in southern Chile; i.e., ambient 24-h PM2.5 concentrations have exceeded 150 mug/m3 in the winter season and the top concentration reached 372 mug/m3 in 2010. Annual mean concentrations have decreased but are still above 30 mug/m3. For the very first time, a molecular marker source apportionment of ambient organic carbon (OC) and PM2.5 was conducted in Temuco. Primary resolved sources for PM2.5 were wood smoke (37.5%), coal combustion (4.4%), diesel vehicles (3.3%), dust (2.2%) and vegetative detritus (0.7%). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 (sulfates, nitrates and ammonium) contributed 4.8% and unresolved organic aerosols (generated from volatile emissions from incomplete wood combustion), including secondary organic aerosols, contributed 47.1%. Adding the contributions of unresolved organic aerosols to those from primary wood smoke implies that wood burning is responsible for 84.6% of the ambient PM2.5 in Temuco. This predominance of wood smoke is ultimately due to widespread poverty and a lack of efficient household heating methods. The government has been implementing emission abatement policies but achieving compliance with ambient air quality standards for PM2.5 in southern Chile remains a challenge.  
  Address Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28318790 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 97509  
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Author Perez-Martinez, P.J.; de Fatima Andrade, M.; de Miranda, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Heavy truck restrictions and air quality implications in Sao Paulo, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 202 Issue Pt 1 Pages 55-68  
  Keywords Air pollution trends; Sao Paulo; Traffic-pollutant relationships; Transport emission factors  
  Abstract This study quantified the effects of traffic restrictions on diesel fuel heavy vehicles (HVs) on the air quality of the Bandeirantes corridor using hourly data obtained by continuous monitoring of traffic and air quality at sites located on this avenue. The study addressed the air quality of a city impacted by vehicular emissions and that PM10 and NOX concentrations are mainly due to diesel burning. Data collection was split into two time periods, a period of no traffic constraint on HVs (Nov 2008 and 2009) and a period of constraint (Nov 2010, 2011 and 2012). We found that pollutants on this corridor, mainly PM10 and NOX, decreased significantly during the period from 2008 to 2012 (28 and 43%, 15.8 and 86.9 ppb) as a direct consequence of HV traffic restrictions (a 72% reduction). Rebound effects in the form of increased traffic of light vehicles (LVs) during this time had impacts on the concentration levels, explaining the differences between rates of reduction in HV traffic and pollutants. Reductions in the number of trucks resulted in longer travel times and increased traffic congestion as a consequence of the modal shift towards LVs. We found that a 51% decrease in PM10 (28.8 mug m-3) was due to a reduction in HV traffic (vehicle emissions were estimated to be 71% of total sources, 40.1 mug m-3). This percentage was partially offset by 10% more PM10 emissions related to an increase in LV traffic, while other causes, such as climatic conditions, contributed to a 13% increase in PM10 concentrations. The relationships analyzed in this research served to highlight the need to apply urban transport policies aimed at decreasing pollutant concentrations in Sao Paulo, especially in heavily congested urban corridors on working days.  
  Address School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28719822 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 97508  
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Author Corvalan, C.; Garmendia, M.L.; Jones-Smith, J.; Lutter, C.K.; Miranda, J.J.; Pedraza, L.S.; Popkin, B.M.; Ramirez-Zea, M.; Salvo, D.; Stein, A.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nutrition status of children in Latin America Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity Abbreviated Journal Obes Rev  
  Volume 18 Suppl 2 Issue Pages 7-18  
  Keywords Latin America; childhood obesity; children; nutrition and physical activity situation  
  Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Across the region, children face a dual burden of undernutrition and excess weight. While efforts to address undernutrition have made marked improvements, childhood obesity is on the rise as a result of diets that favour energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle. Over the last decade, changes in socioeconomic conditions, urbanization, retail foods and public transportation have all contributed to childhood obesity in the region. Additional research and research capacity are needed to address this growing epidemic, particularly with respect to designing, implementing and evaluating the impact of evidence-based obesity prevention interventions.  
  Address Hubert Department of Global Health of the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1467-7881 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28741907 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 97507  
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Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial (down) 97506  
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