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Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T.
Title (down) The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr
Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987
Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.
Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97159
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T.
Title (down) The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr
Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987
Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.
Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97261
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T.
Title (down) The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr
Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987
Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.
Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97506
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T.
Title (down) The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr
Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987
Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.
Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98008
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alshehri, M.M.; Robbins, S.M.; Senger, D.L.
Title (down) The Role of Neurotrophin Signaling in Gliomagenesis: A Focus on the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor (p75NTR/CD271) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Vitamins and Hormones Abbreviated Journal Vitam Horm
Volume 104 Issue Pages 367-404
Keywords Brain tumor; Cd271; Cancer stem cells; Glioblastoma; Glioma invasion; Nerve growth factor; Neurotrophin; p75(NTR)
Abstract The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR, a.k.a. CD271), a transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis family (TNF) of receptors, was originally identified as a nerve growth factor receptor in the mid-1980s. While p75NTR is recognized to have important roles during neural development, its presence in both neural and nonneural tissues clearly supports the potential to mediate a broad range of functions depending on cellular context. Using an unbiased in vivo selection paradigm for genes underlying the invasive behavior of glioma, a critical characteristic that contributes to poor clinical outcome for glioma patients, we identified p75NTR as a central regulator of glioma invasion. Herein we review the expanding role that p75NTR plays in glioma progression with an emphasis on how p75NTR may contribute to the treatment refractory nature of glioma. Based on the observation that p75NTR is expressed and functional in two critical glioma disease reservoirs, namely, the highly infiltrative cells that evade surgical resection, and the radiation- and chemotherapy-resistant brain tumor-initiating cells (also referred to as brain tumor stem cells), we propose that p75NTR and its myriad of downstream signaling effectors represent rationale therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. Lastly, we provide the provocative hypothesis that, in addition to the well-documented cell autonomous signaling functions, the neurotrophins, and their respective receptors, contribute in a cell nonautonomous manner to drive the complex cellular and molecular composition of the brain tumor microenvironment, an environment that fuels tumorigenesis.
Address Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. Electronic address: senger@ucalgary.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0083-6729 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28215302 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96606
Permanent link to this record