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Author Del Brutto, O.H.; Mera, R.M.; Zambrano, M.; Del Brutto, V.J.
Title (down) Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Stroke : Official Journal of the International Stroke Society Abbreviated Journal Int J Stroke
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 201-204
Keywords Adult; Comorbidity; Ecuador/epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension/complications/epidemiology; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Mouth, Edentulous/complications/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Rural Population; Severity of Illness Index; Stroke/complications/*epidemiology; Ecuador; Stroke incidence; cohort study; edentulism; stroke risk factors
Abstract Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged >/=40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 +/- 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged >/=57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.
Address 4 Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1747-4930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27777377 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97655
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Author Jimenez, M.M.; Arias, J.; Carrasquilla, G.
Title (down) Seroprevalence of dengue infection in the municipalities of Armenia, Calarca, La Tebaida and Montenegro in Quindio, 2014 Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud Abbreviated Journal Biomedica
Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 34-41
Keywords Dengue/epidemiology; immunoglobulin G; immunoglobulin M; prevalence; public health, Colombia
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Dengue is a serious public health problem in Colombia; it is prevalent in 90% of the municipalities in Quindio. Studies on its seroprevalence are required to address public health interventions. OBJECTIVE: To establish the seroprevalence of dengue infection in neighborhoods with high incidence in the municipalities of Armenia, Calarca, La Tebaida and Montenegro, Quindio, in 2014. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a probabilistic, stratified, two-stage prevalence study. We interviewed 658 residents in the urban area of the selected municipalities. After they signed the informed consent, we took a blood sample to determine dengue IgG and IgM antibodies. RESULTS: Seroprevalence of IgG in Quindio was 89,4%; in Armenia it was 88,7%, in Calarca, 81,5%, in Montenegro, 91,8% and in La Tebaida 97,8%. IgM was 14, 2% in Quindio; in Armenia it was 11,5%, in Calarca, 13,0%, in Montenegro, 13,1% and in La Tebaida, 28,9%. CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of both IgG and IgM in the four municipalities. We had positive results for IgM in all age groups, which suggests recent infection. We also found simultaneous seropositivity for IgG and IgM (12.9%), which may indicate infection by another serotype or presence of infection in the past three months. A multisectoral approach is necessary for dengue control in Quindio.
Address Eje de Salud Publica, Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogota, Bogota, D.C., Colombia. monica.jimenez@fsfb.org.co
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0120-4157 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28527246 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97637
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Author Roy, A.; Attarha, S.; Weishaupt, H.; Edqvist, P.-H.; Swartling, F.J.; Bergqvist, M.; Siebzehnrubl, F.A.; Smits, A.; Ponten, F.; Tchougounova, E.
Title (down) Serglycin as a potential biomarker for glioma: association of serglycin expression, extent of mast cell recruitment and glioblastoma progression Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Oncotarget Abbreviated Journal Oncotarget
Volume 8 Issue 15 Pages 24815-24827
Keywords Cd44; Zeb1; glioma; mast cell; serglycin
Abstract Serglycin is an intracellular proteoglycan with a unique ability to adopt highly divergent structures by glycosylation with variable types of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) when expressed by different cell types. Serglycin is overexpressed in aggressive cancers suggesting its protumorigenic role. In this study, we explored the expression of serglycin in human glioma and its correlation with survival and immune cell infiltration. We demonstrate that serglycin is expressed in glioma and that increased expression predicts poor survival of patients. Analysis of serglycin expression in a large cohort of low- and high-grade human glioma samples reveals that its expression is grade dependent and is positively correlated with mast cell (MC) infiltration. Moreover, serglycin expression in patient-derived glioma cells is significantly increased upon MC co-culture. This is also accompanied by increased expression of CXCL12, CXCL10, as well as markers of cancer progression, including CD44, ZEB1 and vimentin.In conclusion, these findings indicate the importance of infiltrating MCs in glioma by modulating signaling cascades involving serglycin, CD44 and ZEB1. The present investigation reveals serglycin as a potential prognostic marker for glioma and demonstrates an association with the extent of MC recruitment and glioma progression, uncovering potential future therapeutic opportunities for patients.
Address Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1949-2553 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28445977 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96590
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Author Loza-Correa, M.; Kou, Y.; Taha, M.; Kalab, M.; Ronholm, J.; Schlievert, P.M.; Cahill, M.P.; Skeate, R.; Cserti-Gazdewich, C.; Ramirez-Arcos, S.
Title (down) Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transfusion Abbreviated Journal Transfusion
Volume 57 Issue 5 Pages 1299-1303
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy; Platelet Transfusion/*adverse effects; Sepsis/*etiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*transmission; *Staphylococcus aureus; Transfusion Reaction/*microbiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. CASE REPORT: This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. DISCUSSION: As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. CONCLUSION: Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units.
Address Canadian Blood Services
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0041-1132 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28205241 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99087
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Author Loza-Correa, M.; Kou, Y.; Taha, M.; Kalab, M.; Ronholm, J.; Schlievert, P.M.; Cahill, M.P.; Skeate, R.; Cserti-Gazdewich, C.; Ramirez-Arcos, S.
Title (down) Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transfusion Abbreviated Journal Transfusion
Volume 57 Issue 5 Pages 1299-1303
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy; Platelet Transfusion/*adverse effects; Sepsis/*etiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*transmission; *Staphylococcus aureus; Transfusion Reaction/*microbiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. CASE REPORT: This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. DISCUSSION: As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. CONCLUSION: Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units.
Address Canadian Blood Services
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0041-1132 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28205241 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100117
Permanent link to this record