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Author Goncalves, P.B.; Hallal, P.C.; Hino, A.A.F.; Reis, R.S.
Title (down) Individual and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adults from Curitiba, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Public Health
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Accelerometry; Adults; Environmental correlates; Individual correlates; Physical activity; Sedentary time
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association of individual and neighborhood environment characteristics and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in adults from Curitiba, Brazil. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted through face-to-face household interviews in 2010. The analytic sample included 305 adults aged 20-65 years recruited from 32 census tracts selected according to neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status. Individual and environmental PA correlates were evaluated through standardized and valid self-reported measures, including the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Minutes per week of PA and ST were assessed through accelerometry. Multi-level regression models were used in the analyses. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders the strongest individual and environmental correlates associated with ST was residential density (B = 0.14; p = 0.008), light-intensity PA was being a father/mother (B = 35.71; p = 0.025) and moderate-to-vigorous PA was sex (B = 0.91; p < 0.001) and number of cars (one car, B = -1.05; two cars, B = -1.14; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The associations found with individual and environmental correlates varied accordingly across all outcomes. Future changes in policies and infrastructure should consider the social context of the community and improvements to promote a safer environment in the neighborhood.
Address Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1661-8556 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28717827 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98014
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Author Shibata, W.; Sohara, M.; Wu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Yagi, S.; Yaguchi, K.; Iizuka, Y.; Iwasa, M.; Nakahata, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okada, M.; Taniguchi, K.; Hayashi, A.; Inazawa, S.; Inagaki, N.; Sasaki, T.; Koh, R.; Kinoshita, H.; Nishio, M.; Ogashiwa, T.; Ookawara, A.; Miyajima, E.; Oba, M.; Ohge, H.; Maeda, S.; Kimura, H.; Kunisaki, R.
Title (down) Incidence and Outcomes of Central Venous Catheter-related Blood Stream Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Routine Clinical Practice Setting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Abbreviated Journal Inflamm Bowel Dis
Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 2042-2047
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occasionally require central venous catheter (CVC) placement to support a therapeutic plan. Given that CVC can predispose patients to infection, this investigation was undertaken to assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CVC-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) in patients with IBD during routine clinical practice. METHODS: Data were compiled using retrospective chart reviews of 1367 patients treated at our IBD center between 2007 and 2012 during routine clinical practice. Among the 1367 patients, 314 who had received CVC placements were included. Patients with positive blood culture were considered as “definite” CRBSI, whereas “possible” CRBSI was defined as patients in whom fever alleviated within 48 hours post-CVC without any other infection. Patients' demographic variables including age, body mass index, serum albumin, duration of CVC placement, use of antibiotics, medications for IBD, and perioperative status between CRBSI and non-CRBSI subgroups were compared by applying a multivariate Poisson logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the 314 patients with CVC placement, there were 83 CRBSI cases (26.4%). The average time to the onset of CRBSI was 22.5 days (range 4-105 days). The jugular vein access was found to be the most serious risk of CRBSI (risk ratio 2.041 versus subclavian vein). All patients with CRBSI fully recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In this investigation, regardless of the patients' demographic features including immunosuppressive therapy, up to 30% of febrile IBD patients with CVC showed CRBSI. It is believed that CVC placement per se is a risk of CRBSI in patients with IBD.
Address *Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan;daggerDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan;double daggerSchool of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; section signDepartment of Laboratory Medicine and Clinical Investigation, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan; ||Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; and paragraph signDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University Hospital, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1078-0998 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29045261 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99359
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Author Shibata, W.; Sohara, M.; Wu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Yagi, S.; Yaguchi, K.; Iizuka, Y.; Iwasa, M.; Nakahata, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okada, M.; Taniguchi, K.; Hayashi, A.; Inazawa, S.; Inagaki, N.; Sasaki, T.; Koh, R.; Kinoshita, H.; Nishio, M.; Ogashiwa, T.; Ookawara, A.; Miyajima, E.; Oba, M.; Ohge, H.; Maeda, S.; Kimura, H.; Kunisaki, R.
Title (down) Incidence and Outcomes of Central Venous Catheter-related Blood Stream Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Routine Clinical Practice Setting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Abbreviated Journal Inflamm Bowel Dis
Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 2042-2047
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occasionally require central venous catheter (CVC) placement to support a therapeutic plan. Given that CVC can predispose patients to infection, this investigation was undertaken to assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CVC-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) in patients with IBD during routine clinical practice. METHODS: Data were compiled using retrospective chart reviews of 1367 patients treated at our IBD center between 2007 and 2012 during routine clinical practice. Among the 1367 patients, 314 who had received CVC placements were included. Patients with positive blood culture were considered as “definite” CRBSI, whereas “possible” CRBSI was defined as patients in whom fever alleviated within 48 hours post-CVC without any other infection. Patients' demographic variables including age, body mass index, serum albumin, duration of CVC placement, use of antibiotics, medications for IBD, and perioperative status between CRBSI and non-CRBSI subgroups were compared by applying a multivariate Poisson logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the 314 patients with CVC placement, there were 83 CRBSI cases (26.4%). The average time to the onset of CRBSI was 22.5 days (range 4-105 days). The jugular vein access was found to be the most serious risk of CRBSI (risk ratio 2.041 versus subclavian vein). All patients with CRBSI fully recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In this investigation, regardless of the patients' demographic features including immunosuppressive therapy, up to 30% of febrile IBD patients with CVC showed CRBSI. It is believed that CVC placement per se is a risk of CRBSI in patients with IBD.
Address *Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan;daggerDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan;double daggerSchool of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; section signDepartment of Laboratory Medicine and Clinical Investigation, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan; ||Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; and paragraph signDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University Hospital, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1078-0998 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29045261 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100389
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Polex-Wolf, J.; Yeo, G.S.H.; O'Rahilly, S.
Title (down) Impaired prohormone processing: a grand unified theory for features of Prader-Willi syndrome? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Clinical Investigation Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest
Volume 127 Issue 1 Pages 98-99
Keywords
Abstract Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex disorder that manifests with an array of phenotypes, such as hypotonia and difficulties in feeding during infancy and reduced energy expenditure, hyperphagia, and developmental delays later in life. While the genetic cause has long been known, it is still not clear how mutations at this locus produce this array of phenotypes. In this issue of the JCI, Burnett and colleagues used a comprehensive approach to gain insight into how PWS-associated mutations drive disease. Using neurons derived from PWS patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mouse models, the authors provide evidence that neuroendocrine PWS-associated phenotypes may be linked to reduced expression of prohormone convertase 1 (PC1). While these compelling results support a critical role for PC1 deficiency in PWS, more work needs to be done to fully understand how and to what extent loss of this prohormone processing enzyme underlies disease manifestations in PWS patients.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-9738 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27941250 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95907
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Author Yu, W.-L.; Lee, M.-F.; Chen, C.-C.; Tang, H.-J.; Ho, C.-H.; Chuang, Y.-C.
Title (down) Impacts of Hypervirulence Determinants on Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Microb Drug Resist
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 376-383
Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology; Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Cross Infection/drug therapy/microbiology; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*genetics; Male; Middle Aged; Serogroup; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Virulence Factors/*genetics; beta-Lactamases/*genetics; Esbl; Klebsiella pneumoniae; hypermucoviscosity; hypervirulence; rmpA; virulence
Abstract We investigated the implications of hypervirulence determinants on clinical features of 48 adult patients with bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates in the hypervirulence group included any of the following virulence determinants: K1/K2 capsule serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, rmpA gene, or rmpA2 gene. Nonhypervirulence group isolates were negative for all of the above virulence factors. In this study, all isolates used were non-K1/K2 strains. Statistically significant differences were observed in clinical features of patients between the two groups. The hypervirulent isolates (n = 19), including 11 isolates with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, 15 with the rmpA gene, and 16 with the rmpA2 gene, were more commonly recovered from diabetic patients and mainly manifested as secondary bacteremia (such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, or other localized infections). The nonhypervirulent isolates (n = 29) were more commonly recovered from patients after prolonged hospital stays (>30 days) and mostly manifested as primary bacteremia. The overall in-hospital mortality was 56.3%. Hazard ratio (HR) analysis revealed the following positive predictors for mortality: nosocomial infection, stay in an intensive care unit, no removal of the central venous catheter, Charlson comorbidity score, and APACHE II score (>==15). The negative predictors were initial appropriate antibiotic therapy (HR 0.42) and urinary tract infection (HR 0.19). Charlson score was an independent confounder based on multivariate analysis (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.99). In conclusion, hypervirulence determinants played a role in causing secondary infections in diabetic patients; however, the presence of morbidity cofactors could themselves influence mortality, despite the absence of hypervirulence determinants.
Address 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center-Liou Ying , Tainan City, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1076-6294 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27380450 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99505
Permanent link to this record