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Author Gragnani, A.; de Oliveira, A.F.; Boro, D.; Pham, T.N.; Ferreira, L.M.
Title (up) Response and legislative changes after the Kiss nightclub tragedy in Santa Maria/RS/Brazil: Learning from a large-scale burn disaster Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Abbreviated Journal Burns
Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 343-349
Keywords Brazil/epidemiology; Burns/epidemiology/*prevention & control; Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/epidemiology; Crowding; Disasters/*prevention & control; Fires/legislation & jurisprudence/*prevention & control; Humans; Hydrolases/poisoning; Mass Casualty Incidents/*prevention & control/statistics & numerical data; *Public Policy; Retrospective Studies; Safety/*legislation & jurisprudence; Smoke Inhalation Injury/epidemiology; Burn disaster; Fire prevention and protection; Kiss nightclub; Legislation; Mass casualty incident; Santa Maria
Abstract PURPOSE: A major fire occurred on January 27, 2013, at 02:30 at Kiss nightclub in the city of Santa Maria, State of Rio Grande do Sul, in Southern Brazil. In this retrospective report, we aimed to describe the nightclub fire event, its immediate consequences, and evaluated its impact on legislation. Our objective was to disseminate the lessons we learned from this large-scale nightclub fire disaster. METHODS: We conducted a literature review in PubMed and Lilacs database from 2013 to 2015 related to the nightclub Kiss, Santa Maria, fire, burns, and similar events worldwide over the past 15 years. We searched in the general press and online media information sites, and seeking legislation about this topic at the federal level in Brazil. We reported on the legislation changes that resulted from this nightclub fire. RESULTS: Current federal legislation on fire prevention and the scope of public safety, including night clubs and discos, states is the duty of the state and everyone's responsibility, pursuant to Article 144 of the Federal Constitution of Brazil. Thus, the federal union, individual states and municipalities have the power to legislate on fire prevention, and especially to ensure the security of the population. A state law called “Law Kiss”, was passed in 2014, establishing standards on safety, prevention and protection against fire in buildings and areas of fire risk in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. On a national level, a law of prevention and fire fighting in Brazil was also drafted after the Santa Maria disaster (Law project no. 4923, 2013). Currently, this bill is still awaiting sanction before it can take effect. CONCLUSION: As we push for enactment of the national law of prevention and fire fighting in Brazil, we will continue emphasizing fire prevention, fire protection, fire fighting, means of escape and proper management. All similar events in this and other countries remind us that similar tragedies may occur anywhere, and that the analysis of facts, previous mistakes, during and after the incident are crucial to our understanding, and will help us lessen the chance of future occurrences.
Address Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0305-4179 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27663506 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97661
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A.
Title (up) Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 82
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.
Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99123
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A.
Title (up) Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 82
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.
Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100153
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rogers, A.E.J.; Eisenman, K.M.; Dolan, S.A.; Belderson, K.M.; Zauche, J.R.; Tong, S.; Gralla, J.; Hilden, J.M.; Wang, M.; Maloney, K.W.; Dominguez, S.R.
Title (up) Risk factors for bacteremia and central line-associated blood stream infections in children with acute myelogenous leukemia: A single-institution report Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Pediatric Blood & Cancer Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Blood Cancer
Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords Adolescent; Bacteremia/*etiology; Bacteria/isolation & purification; Case-Control Studies; Catheter-Related Infections/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection/*etiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*complications/microbiology; Male; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Clabsi; acute myelogenous leukemia; bacteremia; pediatric oncology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) are a source of high morbidity and mortality in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). PROCEDURE: To understand the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the development of CLABSI in children with AML. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with AML over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011 at the Children's Hospital Colorado. Cases and controls were classified on the basis of the presence of a CLABSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network. RESULTS: Of 40 patients in the study, 25 (62.5%) developed at least one CLABSI during therapy. The majority of CLABSIs were due to oral or gastrointestinal organisms (83.0%). Skin organisms accounted for 8.5%. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest risk factors associated with CLABSI were diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-28.7), receipt of blood products in the preceding 4-7 days (OR 10.0, 95%CI 3.2-31.0), not receiving antibiotics (OR 8.3, 95%CI 2.8-25.0), and chemotherapy cycle (OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-8.9). CLABSIs led to increased morbidity, with 13 cases (32.5%) versus two controls (1.9%) requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Three (7.5%) of 40 CLABSI events resulted in or contributed to death. CONCLUSIONS: Intensified line care efforts cannot eliminate all CLABSIs in the patients with AML. Exploring the role of mucosal barrier breakdown and/or the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective strategies for further prevention of CLABSIs, supporting ongoing trials in this patient population.
Address Department of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1545-5009 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27616655 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99291
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rogers, A.E.J.; Eisenman, K.M.; Dolan, S.A.; Belderson, K.M.; Zauche, J.R.; Tong, S.; Gralla, J.; Hilden, J.M.; Wang, M.; Maloney, K.W.; Dominguez, S.R.
Title (up) Risk factors for bacteremia and central line-associated blood stream infections in children with acute myelogenous leukemia: A single-institution report Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Pediatric Blood & Cancer Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Blood Cancer
Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords Adolescent; Bacteremia/*etiology; Bacteria/isolation & purification; Case-Control Studies; Catheter-Related Infections/*etiology; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection/*etiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*complications/microbiology; Male; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Clabsi; acute myelogenous leukemia; bacteremia; pediatric oncology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) are a source of high morbidity and mortality in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). PROCEDURE: To understand the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the development of CLABSI in children with AML. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with AML over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011 at the Children's Hospital Colorado. Cases and controls were classified on the basis of the presence of a CLABSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network. RESULTS: Of 40 patients in the study, 25 (62.5%) developed at least one CLABSI during therapy. The majority of CLABSIs were due to oral or gastrointestinal organisms (83.0%). Skin organisms accounted for 8.5%. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest risk factors associated with CLABSI were diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-28.7), receipt of blood products in the preceding 4-7 days (OR 10.0, 95%CI 3.2-31.0), not receiving antibiotics (OR 8.3, 95%CI 2.8-25.0), and chemotherapy cycle (OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-8.9). CLABSIs led to increased morbidity, with 13 cases (32.5%) versus two controls (1.9%) requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Three (7.5%) of 40 CLABSI events resulted in or contributed to death. CONCLUSIONS: Intensified line care efforts cannot eliminate all CLABSIs in the patients with AML. Exploring the role of mucosal barrier breakdown and/or the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective strategies for further prevention of CLABSIs, supporting ongoing trials in this patient population.
Address Department of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1545-5009 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27616655 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100321
Permanent link to this record