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Author Shibata, W.; Sohara, M.; Wu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Yagi, S.; Yaguchi, K.; Iizuka, Y.; Iwasa, M.; Nakahata, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okada, M.; Taniguchi, K.; Hayashi, A.; Inazawa, S.; Inagaki, N.; Sasaki, T.; Koh, R.; Kinoshita, H.; Nishio, M.; Ogashiwa, T.; Ookawara, A.; Miyajima, E.; Oba, M.; Ohge, H.; Maeda, S.; Kimura, H.; Kunisaki, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Incidence and Outcomes of Central Venous Catheter-related Blood Stream Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Routine Clinical Practice Setting Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Abbreviated Journal Inflamm Bowel Dis  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 2042-2047  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occasionally require central venous catheter (CVC) placement to support a therapeutic plan. Given that CVC can predispose patients to infection, this investigation was undertaken to assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CVC-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) in patients with IBD during routine clinical practice. METHODS: Data were compiled using retrospective chart reviews of 1367 patients treated at our IBD center between 2007 and 2012 during routine clinical practice. Among the 1367 patients, 314 who had received CVC placements were included. Patients with positive blood culture were considered as “definite” CRBSI, whereas “possible” CRBSI was defined as patients in whom fever alleviated within 48 hours post-CVC without any other infection. Patients' demographic variables including age, body mass index, serum albumin, duration of CVC placement, use of antibiotics, medications for IBD, and perioperative status between CRBSI and non-CRBSI subgroups were compared by applying a multivariate Poisson logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the 314 patients with CVC placement, there were 83 CRBSI cases (26.4%). The average time to the onset of CRBSI was 22.5 days (range 4-105 days). The jugular vein access was found to be the most serious risk of CRBSI (risk ratio 2.041 versus subclavian vein). All patients with CRBSI fully recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In this investigation, regardless of the patients' demographic features including immunosuppressive therapy, up to 30% of febrile IBD patients with CVC showed CRBSI. It is believed that CVC placement per se is a risk of CRBSI in patients with IBD.  
  Address *Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan;daggerDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan;double daggerSchool of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; section signDepartment of Laboratory Medicine and Clinical Investigation, Yokohama City University Medical Centre, Yokohama, Japan; ||Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan; and paragraph signDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University Hospital, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-0998 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29045261 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100389  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Goncalves, P.B.; Hallal, P.C.; Hino, A.A.F.; Reis, R.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Individual and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adults from Curitiba, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Public Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Accelerometry; Adults; Environmental correlates; Individual correlates; Physical activity; Sedentary time  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association of individual and neighborhood environment characteristics and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in adults from Curitiba, Brazil. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted through face-to-face household interviews in 2010. The analytic sample included 305 adults aged 20-65 years recruited from 32 census tracts selected according to neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status. Individual and environmental PA correlates were evaluated through standardized and valid self-reported measures, including the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Minutes per week of PA and ST were assessed through accelerometry. Multi-level regression models were used in the analyses. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders the strongest individual and environmental correlates associated with ST was residential density (B = 0.14; p = 0.008), light-intensity PA was being a father/mother (B = 35.71; p = 0.025) and moderate-to-vigorous PA was sex (B = 0.91; p < 0.001) and number of cars (one car, B = -1.05; two cars, B = -1.14; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The associations found with individual and environmental correlates varied accordingly across all outcomes. Future changes in policies and infrastructure should consider the social context of the community and improvements to promote a safer environment in the neighborhood.  
  Address Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1661-8556 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28717827 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97632  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Goncalves, P.B.; Hallal, P.C.; Hino, A.A.F.; Reis, R.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Individual and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adults from Curitiba, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Public Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Accelerometry; Adults; Environmental correlates; Individual correlates; Physical activity; Sedentary time  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association of individual and neighborhood environment characteristics and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in adults from Curitiba, Brazil. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted through face-to-face household interviews in 2010. The analytic sample included 305 adults aged 20-65 years recruited from 32 census tracts selected according to neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status. Individual and environmental PA correlates were evaluated through standardized and valid self-reported measures, including the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Minutes per week of PA and ST were assessed through accelerometry. Multi-level regression models were used in the analyses. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders the strongest individual and environmental correlates associated with ST was residential density (B = 0.14; p = 0.008), light-intensity PA was being a father/mother (B = 35.71; p = 0.025) and moderate-to-vigorous PA was sex (B = 0.91; p < 0.001) and number of cars (one car, B = -1.05; two cars, B = -1.14; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The associations found with individual and environmental correlates varied accordingly across all outcomes. Future changes in policies and infrastructure should consider the social context of the community and improvements to promote a safer environment in the neighborhood.  
  Address Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1661-8556 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28717827 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98014  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ramirez-Blanco, C.E.; Ramirez-Rivero, C.E.; Diaz-Martinez, L.A.; Sosa-Avila, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Infection in burn patients in a referral center in Colombia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Abbreviated Journal Burns  
  Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 642-653  
  Keywords Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Acinetobacter baumannii; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Burns/*epidemiology; Catheter-Related Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Cephalosporins/therapeutic use; Child; Child, Preschool; Colombia/epidemiology; Drug Resistance, Microbial; Escherichia coli; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Folliculitis/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Male; Middle Aged; Oxacillin/therapeutic use; Pneumonia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Wound Infection/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Young Adult; Burn wound infection; Burns; Health care related infection; Nosocomial infection; Pneumonia; Urinary tract infection  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, burns are responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually; infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early identification and treatment of infection improves outcome. Toward this end it's necessary to identify the institutions flora and organisms that most frequently produces infection. OBJECTIVES: To characterize infections developed by burn patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Santander (HUS). METHODOLOGY: Burn patients hospitalized in the HUS from January 1 to December 2014 were followed. Medical information regarding infections, laboratory and pathology reports were obtained. Statistical analysis with measures of central tendency, proportions, global and specific incidence density plus overall and specific incidence was obtained. For the microbiological profile proportions were established. RESULTS: 402 burn patients were included, 234 (58.2%) men and 168 (41.8%) women, aged between 6 days and 83 years, median 12.5 years. The burn agents include scald (52.5%), fire (10.0%), gasoline (9.2%), electricity (7.5%), among others. Burn area ranged from 1% to 80% TBS. Cumulative mortality was 1.5%. 27.8% of burned patients had one or more infections. Identified infections include folliculitis (27.0%), urinary tract infection (19.0%), infection of the burn wound (10.4%), pneumonia (8.6%), Central venous catheter (7.4%), bloodstream infection (7.4%) and skin grafts infection (4.3%) among others. Bacteria were responsible for 88.5% of the cases and fungi 11.5%. The most frequently isolated germs were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, E. coli, S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Most gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to Amikacin, gram positive bacteria were sensitive to multiple antibiotics. CONCLUSION: Burns is a severe trauma that occurs in adult and pediatric patients, has several causative agents and can compromise the patient's life. The burned patient is at risk for a variety of infections. According to the type of infection it is possible to infer the most common causative organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity/resistance which allow a directed early empiric treatment.  
  Address University Hospital of Santander, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia. Electronic address: lumisosa@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0305-4179 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28185802 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99267  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ramirez-Blanco, C.E.; Ramirez-Rivero, C.E.; Diaz-Martinez, L.A.; Sosa-Avila, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Infection in burn patients in a referral center in Colombia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Abbreviated Journal Burns  
  Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 642-653  
  Keywords Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Acinetobacter baumannii; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bacteremia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Burns/*epidemiology; Catheter-Related Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Central Venous Catheters; Cephalosporins/therapeutic use; Child; Child, Preschool; Colombia/epidemiology; Drug Resistance, Microbial; Escherichia coli; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Folliculitis/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Male; Middle Aged; Oxacillin/therapeutic use; Pneumonia/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus; Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Wound Infection/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology; Young Adult; Burn wound infection; Burns; Health care related infection; Nosocomial infection; Pneumonia; Urinary tract infection  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, burns are responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually; infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early identification and treatment of infection improves outcome. Toward this end it's necessary to identify the institutions flora and organisms that most frequently produces infection. OBJECTIVES: To characterize infections developed by burn patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Santander (HUS). METHODOLOGY: Burn patients hospitalized in the HUS from January 1 to December 2014 were followed. Medical information regarding infections, laboratory and pathology reports were obtained. Statistical analysis with measures of central tendency, proportions, global and specific incidence density plus overall and specific incidence was obtained. For the microbiological profile proportions were established. RESULTS: 402 burn patients were included, 234 (58.2%) men and 168 (41.8%) women, aged between 6 days and 83 years, median 12.5 years. The burn agents include scald (52.5%), fire (10.0%), gasoline (9.2%), electricity (7.5%), among others. Burn area ranged from 1% to 80% TBS. Cumulative mortality was 1.5%. 27.8% of burned patients had one or more infections. Identified infections include folliculitis (27.0%), urinary tract infection (19.0%), infection of the burn wound (10.4%), pneumonia (8.6%), Central venous catheter (7.4%), bloodstream infection (7.4%) and skin grafts infection (4.3%) among others. Bacteria were responsible for 88.5% of the cases and fungi 11.5%. The most frequently isolated germs were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, E. coli, S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Most gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to Amikacin, gram positive bacteria were sensitive to multiple antibiotics. CONCLUSION: Burns is a severe trauma that occurs in adult and pediatric patients, has several causative agents and can compromise the patient's life. The burned patient is at risk for a variety of infections. According to the type of infection it is possible to infer the most common causative organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity/resistance which allow a directed early empiric treatment.  
  Address University Hospital of Santander, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia. Electronic address: lumisosa@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0305-4179 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28185802 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100297  
Permanent link to this record
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