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Author Saleh, H.M.; Tawfik, M.M.; Abouellail, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, randomized study of long-term hemodialysis catheter removal versus guidewire exchange to treat catheter-related bloodstream infection Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Vascular Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Surg  
  Volume 66 Issue 5 Pages 1427-1431.e1  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/blood/diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects/*instrumentation; Catheters, Indwelling/*adverse effects; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; *Device Removal/adverse effects; Disease-Free Survival; Egypt; Equipment Design; Female; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Long-term (tunneled cuffed) hemodialysis catheters are frequently used vascular access in renal failure patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a common complication of long-term hemodialysis catheters, with severe morbidities and high risk of mortality. Management of CRBSI by systemic antibiotics while keeping the catheter in place is not effective. Among the different modalities of CRBSI management are catheter removal (CR) and guidewire exchange (GE) of the catheter. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with two different strategies: GE vs CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. METHODS: This prospective randomized study analyzed the outcomes of all cases of long-term hemodialysis CRBSI during a 5-year period. The catheter infection-free survival time was analyzed in the two groups of patients (GE group, 339 patients; CR group, 339 patients). Three weeks of systemic antibiotic therapy was used according to culture in both groups. The catheter infection-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in catheter infection-free survival time for GE and CR groups (P = .69), which is not affected by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, or type of causative organism. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with GE or CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. However, guidewire catheter exchange saves veins for future access, reduces the cost and number of procedures, and avoids complications of new venipuncture.  
  Address Department of Nephrology, Ain Shams University, El Demerdash Hospital, Cairo, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-5214 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28822660 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Saleh, H.M.; Tawfik, M.M.; Abouellail, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, randomized study of long-term hemodialysis catheter removal versus guidewire exchange to treat catheter-related bloodstream infection Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Vascular Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Vasc Surg  
  Volume 66 Issue 5 Pages 1427-1431.e1  
  Keywords Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheter-Related Infections/blood/diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy; Catheterization, Central Venous/*adverse effects/*instrumentation; Catheters, Indwelling/*adverse effects; Central Venous Catheters/*adverse effects; *Device Removal/adverse effects; Disease-Free Survival; Egypt; Equipment Design; Female; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Renal Dialysis; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Long-term (tunneled cuffed) hemodialysis catheters are frequently used vascular access in renal failure patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a common complication of long-term hemodialysis catheters, with severe morbidities and high risk of mortality. Management of CRBSI by systemic antibiotics while keeping the catheter in place is not effective. Among the different modalities of CRBSI management are catheter removal (CR) and guidewire exchange (GE) of the catheter. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with two different strategies: GE vs CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. METHODS: This prospective randomized study analyzed the outcomes of all cases of long-term hemodialysis CRBSI during a 5-year period. The catheter infection-free survival time was analyzed in the two groups of patients (GE group, 339 patients; CR group, 339 patients). Three weeks of systemic antibiotic therapy was used according to culture in both groups. The catheter infection-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in catheter infection-free survival time for GE and CR groups (P = .69), which is not affected by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, or type of causative organism. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in the clinical outcome of CRBSI treated with GE or CR with new catheter insertion 3 to 7 days later. However, guidewire catheter exchange saves veins for future access, reduces the cost and number of procedures, and avoids complications of new venipuncture.  
  Address Department of Nephrology, Ain Shams University, El Demerdash Hospital, Cairo, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-5214 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28822660 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Basso, C.; Garcia da Rosa, E.; Lairihoy, R.; Caffera, R.M.; Roche, I.; Gonzalez, C.; da Rosa, R.; Gularte, A.; Alfonso-Sierra, E.; Petzold, M.; Kroeger, A.; Sommerfeld, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Scaling Up of an Innovative Intervention to Reduce Risk of Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Transmission in Uruguay in the Framework of an Intersectoral Approach with and without Community Participation Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abbreviated Journal Am J Trop Med Hyg  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To contribute to the prevention of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika, a process of scaling up an innovative intervention to reduce Aedes aegypti habitats, was carried out in the city of Salto (Uruguay) based on a transdisciplinary analysis of the eco-bio-social determinants. The intervention in one-third of the city included the distributions of plastic bags for all households to collect all discarded water containers that were recollected by the Ministry of Health and the Municipality vector control services. The results were evaluated in 20 randomly assigned clusters of 100 households each, in the intervention and control arm. The intervention resulted in a significantly larger decrease in the number of pupae per person index (as a proxy for adult vector abundance) than the corresponding decrease in the control areas (both areas decreased by winter effects). The reduction of intervention costs (“incremental costs”) in relation to routine vector control activities was 46%. Community participation increased the collaboration with the intervention program considerably (from 48% of bags handed back out of the total of bags delivered to 59% of bags handed back). Although the costs increased by 26% compared with intervention without community participation, the acceptability of actions by residents increased from 66% to 78%.  
  Address Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28820690 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97631  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97159  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97261  
Permanent link to this record
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