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Author Kane, S.P.; Hanes, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Unexplained increases in serum vancomycin concentration in a morbidly obese patient Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Intensive & Critical Care Nursing Abbreviated Journal Intensive Crit Care Nurs  
  Volume 39 Issue Pages 55-58  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Cross Reactions/physiology; Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Middle Aged; Obesity, Morbid/*drug therapy/physiopathology; Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/drug therapy/prevention & control; Vancomycin/*administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Central venous catheters; Critical care; Drug monitoring; Infectious disease; Medication safety; Vancomycin  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: To report a case of increases in vancomycin concentrations without additional vancomycin doses being given. CASE STUDY: A 64 year-old morbidly obese female received three total doses of vancomycin for surgical prophylaxis and for ventilator-associated pneumonia. Subsequent vancomycin concentrations from the patient's central venous catheter (CVC) demonstrated increasing drug levels from 27.1 to 45.9mcg/mL despite no additional vancomycin being given and proper line flushing prior to sample collection. There is no clear explanation for the increase in the patient's vancomycin concentration. Drug leaching from the CVC, enterohepatic recycling, drug redistribution from adipose or other tissues, and assay cross-reactivity with other medications are all potential explanations for the increased vancomycin concentrations. CONCLUSION: This case report describes an unexplained increase in vancomycin concentrations and reinforces both the fallibility of laboratory testing and that unusual circumstances do occur. Several potential causes are hypothesised with CVC drug leaching being the most likely. Nurses and other healthcare providers with similar scenarios should consider a peripheral blood sample to rule out the potential for CVC drug leaching as a possible explanation.  
  Address Department of Pharmacy Practice, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: scott.hanes@rosalindfranklin.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0964-3397 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27899248 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100001  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vershkov, D.; Benvenisty, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human pluripotent stem cells in modeling human disorders: the case of fragile X syndrome Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Regenerative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Regen Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 53-68  
  Keywords disease modeling; drug discovery; embryonic stem cells; fragile X syndrome; human pluripotent stem cells; neural differentiation  
  Abstract Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) generated from affected blastocysts or from patient-derived somatic cells are an emerging platform for disease modeling and drug discovery. Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, was one of the first disorders modeled in both embryonic stem cells and induced PCSs and can serve as an exemplary case for the utilization of human PSCs in the study of human diseases. Over the past decade, FXS-PSCs have been used to address the fundamental questions regarding the pathophysiology of FXS. In this review we summarize the methodologies for generation of FXS-PSCs, discuss their advantages and disadvantages compared with existing modeling systems and describe their utilization in the study of FXS pathogenesis and in the development of targeted treatment.  
  Address The Azrieli Center for Stem Cells & Genetic Research, Department of Genetics, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1746-0751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27900874 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 95909  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hu, B.; Emdad, L.; Kegelman, T.P.; Shen, X.-N.; Das, S.K.; Sarkar, D.; Fisher, P.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Regulates beta-Catenin Signaling to Maintain Glioma Stem-like Stemness and Self-Renewal Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Molecular Cancer Research : MCR Abbreviated Journal Mol Cancer Res  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 225-233  
  Keywords Brain Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Glioblastoma/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*pathology; Signal Transduction; Tumor Cells, Cultured; beta Catenin/genetics/*metabolism  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme is a common malignant brain tumor that portends extremely poor patient survival. Recent studies reveal that glioma stem-like cells (GSC) are responsible for glioblastoma multiforme escape from chemo-radiotherapy and mediators of tumor relapse. Previous studies suggest that AEG-1 (MTDH), an oncogene upregulated in most types of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme, plays a focal role linking multiple signaling pathways in tumorigenesis. We now report a crucial role of AEG-1 in glioma stem cell biology. Primary glioblastoma multiforme cells were isolated from tumor specimens and cultured as neurospheres. Using the surface marker CD133, negative and positive cells were separated as nonstem and stem populations by cell sorting. Tissue samples and low passage cells were characterized and compared with normal controls. Functional biological assays were performed to measure stemness, self-renewal, differentiation, adhesion, protein-protein interactions, and cell signaling. AEG-1 was upregulated in all glioblastoma multiforme neurospheres compared with normal neural stem cells. Expression of AEG-1 was strongly associated with stem cell markers CD133 and SOX2. AEG-1 facilitated beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus by forming a complex with LEF1 and beta-catenin, subsequently activating Wnt signaling downstream genes. Through an AEG-1/Akt/GSK3beta signaling axis, AEG-1 controlled phosphorylation levels of beta-catenin that stabilized the protein. IMPLICATIONS: This study discovers a previously unrecognized role of AEG-1 in GSC biology and supports the significance of this gene as a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma multiforme. Mol Cancer Res; 15(2); 225-33. (c)2016 AACR.  
  Address VCU Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1541-7786 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27903708 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96619  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Radbel, J.; Boutsikaris, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The New Usual Care Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America Abbreviated Journal Emerg Med Clin North Am  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 11-23  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheterization, Central Venous; Clinical Protocols/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Fluid Therapy; Humans; Sepsis/diagnosis/*therapy; ARISE trial; Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT); ProCESS trial; ProMISe trial; Sepsis; Usual care  
  Abstract Recent literature continues to refine which components of the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) algorithm are necessary. Given it utilizes central venous pressure, continuous central venous oxygen saturation, routine blood transfusions, and inotropic medications, this algorithm can be timely, invasive, costly, and potentially harmful. New trials highlight early recognition, early fluid resuscitation, appropriate antibiotic treatment, source control, and the application of a multidisciplinary evidence-based approach as essential components of current sepsis management. This article discusses the landmark sepsis trials that have been published over the past several decades and offers recommendations on what should currently be considered 'usual care'.  
  Address Department of Emergency Medicine, Saint Peters University Hospital, 254 Easton Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. Electronic address: boutsida@rwjms.rutgers.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-8627 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27908328 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99263  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Radbel, J.; Boutsikaris, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The New Usual Care Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America Abbreviated Journal Emerg Med Clin North Am  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 11-23  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Catheterization, Central Venous; Clinical Protocols/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Fluid Therapy; Humans; Sepsis/diagnosis/*therapy; ARISE trial; Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT); ProCESS trial; ProMISe trial; Sepsis; Usual care  
  Abstract Recent literature continues to refine which components of the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) algorithm are necessary. Given it utilizes central venous pressure, continuous central venous oxygen saturation, routine blood transfusions, and inotropic medications, this algorithm can be timely, invasive, costly, and potentially harmful. New trials highlight early recognition, early fluid resuscitation, appropriate antibiotic treatment, source control, and the application of a multidisciplinary evidence-based approach as essential components of current sepsis management. This article discusses the landmark sepsis trials that have been published over the past several decades and offers recommendations on what should currently be considered 'usual care'.  
  Address Department of Emergency Medicine, Saint Peters University Hospital, 254 Easton Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. Electronic address: boutsida@rwjms.rutgers.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-8627 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27908328 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100293  
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