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Author Fogel, O.; Richard-Miceli, C.; Tost, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetic Changes in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology Abbreviated Journal Adv Protein Chem Struct Biol  
  Volume 106 Issue Pages 139-189  
  Keywords Behcet's disease; Crohn's disease; DNA methylation; Ewas; Epigenetics; Histone modifications; Inflammatory bowel disease; Psoriasis; Spondyloarthritis; Ulcerative colitis  
  Abstract The number of people diagnosed with chronic inflammatory diseases has increased noteworthy in the last 40 years. Spondyloarthritis (SpA), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and psoriasis are the most frequent chronic inflammatory diseases, resulting from a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and small and long noncoding RNAs. They are influenced by environmental exposure, life-style, and aging and have recently been shown to be altered in many complex diseases including inflammatory diseases. While epigenetic modifications have been well characterized in other diseases such as cancer and autoimmune diseases, knowledge on changes in inflammatory diseases is lagging behind with some disease-specific differences. While the DNA methylation profile of different cell types in patients with IBD has been relatively well described, less is known on changes implicated in psoriasis, and no systematic genome-wide studies have so far been performed in SpA. In this chapter, we review in detail the reported changes in patterns of DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications in chronic inflammatory diseases highlighting potential connections between disease-associated pathophysiological changes such as the dysbiosis of the microbiome or genetic variations associated with disease susceptibility and the epigenome. We also discuss important parameters of meaningful epigenetic studies such as the use of well defined, disease-relevant cell populations, and elude on the potential future of engineering of the epigenome in inflammatory diseases.  
  Address Laboratory for Epigenetics and Environment, Centre National de Genotypage, CEA-Institut de Genomique, Evry, France. Electronic address: tost@cng.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1876-1623 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28057210 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96374  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fuster, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “We like Fried Things”: Negotiating Health and Taste among Hispanic Caribbean Communities in New York City Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecology of Food and Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Ecol Food Nutr  
  Volume 56 Issue 2 Pages 124-138  
  Keywords Adult; *Cooking; Cuba; Dominican Republic; Female; *Food Analysis; *Food Preferences; Hispanic Americans; Humans; Male; New York City; Puerto Rico; Taste; Young Adult; Emigration and immigration; Hispanic Americans; New York City; qualitative research  
  Abstract The study was conducted to understand fried-food (FF) consumption among Hispanic Caribbean (HC) communities in New York City. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 23 adults self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, or Puerto Rican. Most informants considered FFs an important part of their traditional diet. Potential explanations included taste, cost, convenience, and the emotive values attached to FF. FF consumption was contextualized in local foodscapes. Results include strategies to diminish FF consumption and differences across HC groups and migratory generations. The relevance for future nutrition interventions addressing health disparities in this community is discussed.  
  Address a Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences , City University of New York-Brooklyn College , Brooklyn , New York , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0367-0244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28059558 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98032  
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Author Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, K.; Reza Saadatzadeh, M.; Wang, H.; Nguyen, A.; Kamocka, M.M.; Cai, W.; Cohen-Gadol, A.A.; Halum, S.L.; Sarkaria, J.N.; Pollok, K.E.; Safa, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sulforaphane suppresses the growth of glioblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cell-like spheroids, and tumor xenografts through multiple cell signaling pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neurosurgery Abbreviated Journal J Neurosurg  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords CCCP = carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide; DSB = double-strand break; EGF = epidermal growth factor; FACS = fluorescence-activated cell sorting; FGF = fibroblast growth factor; GBM = glioblastoma; GSC = glioblastoma stem cell; IC50 = 50% inhibition of cell survival; MRC = mitochondrial respiratory chain; MSC = mesenchymal stromal cell; NAC = N-acetylcysteine; NSG = nonobese diabetic scid gamma; PE = phycoerythrin; ROS = reactive oxygen species; SFN = sulforaphane; SSB = single-strand break; apoptosis; cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; oncology; sulforaphane  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE Defects in the apoptotic machinery and augmented survival signals contribute to drug resistance in glioblastoma (GBM). Moreover, another complexity related to GBM treatment is the concept that GBM development and recurrence may arise from the expression of GBM stem cells (GSCs). Therefore, the use of a multifaceted approach or multitargeted agents that affect specific tumor cell characteristics will likely be necessary to successfully eradicate GBM. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of sulforaphane (SFN)-a constituent of cruciferous vegetables with a multitargeted effect-as a therapeutic agent for GBM. METHODS The inhibitory effects of SFN on established cell lines, early primary cultures, CD133-positive GSCs, GSC-derived spheroids, and GBM xenografts were evaluated using various methods, including GSC isolation and the sphere-forming assay, analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, cell growth inhibition assay, comet assays for assessing SFN-triggered DNA damage, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, and the determination of in vivo efficacy as assessed in human GBM xenograft models. RESULTS SFN triggered the significant inhibition of cell survival and induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with caspase 3 and caspase 7 activation. Moreover, SFN triggered the formation of mitochondrial ROS, and SFN-triggered cell death was ROS dependent. Comet assays revealed that SFN increased single- and double-strand DNA breaks in GBM. Compared with the vehicle control cells, a significantly higher amount of gamma-H2AX foci correlated with an increase in DNA double-strand breaks in the SFN-treated samples. Furthermore, SFN robustly inhibited the growth of GBM cell-induced cell death in established cell cultures and early-passage primary cultures and, most importantly, was effective in eliminating GSCs, which play a major role in drug resistance and disease recurrence. In vivo studies revealed that SFN administration at 100 mg/kg for 5-day cycles repeated for 3 weeks significantly decreased the growth of ectopic xenografts that were established from the early passage of primary cultures of GBM10. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that SFN is a potent anti-GBM agent that targets several apoptosis and cell survival pathways and further preclinical and clinical studies may prove that SFN alone or in combination with other therapies may be potentially useful for GBM therapy.  
  Address Departments of 2 Pharmacology and Toxicology and  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3085 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28059653 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96613  
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Author Mistry, A.M.; Dewan, M.C.; White-Dzuro, G.A.; Brinson, P.R.; Weaver, K.D.; Thompson, R.C.; Ihrie, R.A.; Chambless, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Decreased survival in glioblastomas is specific to contact with the ventricular-subventricular zone, not subgranular zone or corpus callosum Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume 132 Issue 2 Pages 341-349  
  Keywords Glioblastoma; Stem cells; Subgranular zone; Subventricular zone; Survival; Ventricular-subventricular zone  
  Abstract The clinical effect of radiographic contact of glioblastoma (GBM) with neurogenic zones (NZ)-the ventricular-subventricular (VSVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones-and the corpus callosum (CC) remains unclear and, in the case of the SGZ, unexplored. We investigated (1) if GBM contact with a NZ correlates with decreased survival; (2) if so, whether this effect is associated with a specific NZ; and (3) if radiographic contact with or invasion of the CC by GBM is associated with decreased survival. We retrospectively identified 207 adult patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery for GBM followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation. Age, preoperative Karnofsky performance status score (KPS), and extent of resection were recorded. Preoperative MRIs were blindly analyzed to calculate tumor volume and assess its contact with VSVZ, SGZ, CC, and cortex. Overall (OS) and progression free (PFS) survivals were calculated and analyzed with multivariate Cox analyses. Among the 207 patients, 111 had GBM contacting VSVZ (VSVZ+GBMs), 23 had SGZ+GBMs, 52 had CC+GBMs, and 164 had cortex+GBMs. VSVZ+, SGZ+, and CC+ GBMs were significantly larger in size relative to their respective non-contacting controls. Multivariate Cox survival analyses revealed GBM contact with the VSVZ, but not SGZ, CC, or cortex, as an independent predictor of lower OS, PFS, and early recurrence. We hypothesize that the VSVZ niche has unique properties that contribute to GBM pathobiology in adults.  
  Address Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, T-4224 Medical Center North, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, 37232-2380, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28074322 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96612  
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Author Munthe, S.; Halle, B.; Boldt, H.B.; Christiansen, H.; Schmidt, S.; Kaimal, V.; Xu, J.; Zabludoff, S.; Mollenhauer, J.; Poulsen, F.R.; Kristensen, B.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift of microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration using patient-derived spheroids and serum-free conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume 132 Issue 1 Pages 45-54  
  Keywords Glioblastoma; MicroRNA; Migration; Serum-free; Target  
  Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent malignant primary brain tumor. A major reason for the overall median survival being only 14.6 months is migrating tumor cells left behind after surgery. Another major reason is tumor cells having a so-called cancer stem cell phenotype being therefore resistant towards traditional chemo- and radiotherapy. A group of novel molecular targets are microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs exerting post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in migrating GBM cells using serum-free stem cell conditions. We used patient-derived GBM spheroid cultures for a novel serum-free migration assay. MiRNA expression of migrating tumor cells isolated at maximum migration speed was compared with corresponding spheroids using an OpenArray Real-Time PCR System. The miRNA profiling revealed 30 miRNAs to be differentially expressed. In total 13 miRNAs were upregulated and 17 downregulated in migrating cells compared to corresponding spheroids. The three most deregulated miRNAs, miR-1227 (up-regulated), miR-32 (down-regulated) and miR-222 (down-regulated), were experimentally overexpressed. A non-significantly increased migration rate was observed after miR-1227 overexpression. A significantly reduced migration rate was observed after miR-32 and miR-222 overexpression. In conclusion a shift in microRNA profile upon glioma cell migration was identified using an assay avoiding serum-induced migration. Both the miRNA profiling and the functional validation suggested that miR-1227 may be associated with increased migration and miR-32 and miR-222 with decreased migration. These miRNAs may represent potential novel targets in migrating glioma cells.  
  Address Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 19, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. bjarne.winther.kristensen@rsyd.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28091986 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96611  
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