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Author Corburn, J.; Sverdlik, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Slum Upgrading and Health Equity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Africa; Asia; Climate Change; Employment; Environmental Health; *Health Equity; Housing; Humans; Latin America; *Poverty Areas; Socioeconomic Factors; Urban Health; Urban Population; climate change adaptation; health equity; health in all policies; housing; participation; slum upgrading; slums; social determinants of health; sustainable development goals  
  Abstract Informal settlement upgrading is widely recognized for enhancing shelter and promoting economic development, yet its potential to improve health equity is usually overlooked. Almost one in seven people on the planet are expected to reside in urban informal settlements, or slums, by 2030. Slum upgrading is the process of delivering place-based environmental and social improvements to the urban poor, including land tenure, housing, infrastructure, employment, health services and political and social inclusion. The processes and products of slum upgrading can address multiple environmental determinants of health. This paper reviewed urban slum upgrading evaluations from cities across Asia, Africa and Latin America and found that few captured the multiple health benefits of upgrading. With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focused on improving well-being for billions of city-dwellers, slum upgrading should be viewed as a key strategy to promote health, equitable development and reduce climate change vulnerabilities. We conclude with suggestions for how slum upgrading might more explicitly capture its health benefits, such as through the use of health impact assessment (HIA) and adopting an urban health in all policies (HiAP) framework. Urban slum upgrading must be more explicitly designed, implemented and evaluated to capture its multiple global environmental health benefits.  
  Address Department of City and Regional Planning & School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. sverdlik@berkeley.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28338613 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97642  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bischof, J.; Westhoff, M.-A.; Wagner, J.E.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Trentmann, S.; Knippschild, U.; Wirtz, C.R.; Burster, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Tumour Biology : the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Tumour Biol  
  Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 1010428317692227  
  Keywords Animals; Autophagy; Brain Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology; Cathepsins/*metabolism; Glioblastoma/*metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*metabolism/*pathology; Proteolysis; *Major histocompatibility complex class I; *autophagy; *cathepsin; *glioblastoma  
  Abstract One major obstacle in cancer therapy is chemoresistance leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Cancer stem cells, in particular glioblastoma stem cells, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and immune recognition. In case of immune recognition, several survival mechanisms including, regulation of autophagy, proteases, and cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, are found in glioblastoma stem cells. In different pathways, cathepsins play a crucial role in processing functional proteins that are necessary for several processes and proper cell function. Consequently, strategies targeting these pathways in glioblastoma stem cells are promising approaches to interfere with tumor cell survival and will be discussed in this review.  
  Address 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Surgery Center, Ulm University Medical Center, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1010-4283 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28347245 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chae, S.; Desai, S.; Crowell, M.; Sedgh, G.; Singh, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of women obtaining induced abortions in selected low- and middle-income countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages e0172976  
  Keywords Abortion, Legal/*economics/psychology/*statistics & numerical data; Adolescent; Adult; Africa; Asia; Caribbean Region; Developing Countries/*economics; Educational Status; Europe; Female; Humans; Latin America; Marital Status/statistics & numerical data; Parity/physiology; Poverty/psychology/*statistics & numerical data; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy, Unplanned  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In 2010-2014, approximately 86% of abortions took place in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although abortion incidence varies minimally across geographical regions, it varies widely by subregion and within countries by subgroups of women. Differential abortion levels stem from variation in the level of unintended pregnancies and in the likelihood that women with unintended pregnancies obtain abortions. OBJECTIVES: To examine the characteristics of women obtaining induced abortions in LMICs. METHODS: We use data from official statistics, population-based surveys, and abortion patient surveys to examine variation in the percentage distribution of abortions and abortion rates by age at abortion, marital status, parity, wealth, education, and residence. We analyze data from five countries in Africa, 13 in Asia, eight in Europe, and two in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). RESULTS: Women across all sociodemographic subgroups obtain abortions. In most countries, women aged 20-29 obtained the highest proportion of abortions, and while adolescents obtained a substantial fraction of abortions, they do not make up a disproportionate share. Region-specific patterns were observed in the distribution of abortions by parity. In many countries, a higher fraction of abortions occurred among women of high socioeconomic status, as measured by wealth status, educational attainment, and urban residence. Due to limited data on marital status, it is unknown whether married or unmarried women make up a larger share of abortions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings help to identify subgroups of women with disproportionate levels of abortion, and can inform policies and programs to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancies; and in LMICs that have restrictive abortion laws, these findings can also inform policies to minimize the consequences of unsafe abortion and motivate liberalization of abortion laws. Program planners, policymakers, and advocates can use this information to improve access to safe abortion services, postabortion care, and contraceptive services.  
  Address Guttmacher Institute, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28355285 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97183  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chae, S.; Desai, S.; Crowell, M.; Sedgh, G.; Singh, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of women obtaining induced abortions in selected low- and middle-income countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages e0172976  
  Keywords Abortion, Legal/*economics/psychology/*statistics & numerical data; Adolescent; Adult; Africa; Asia; Caribbean Region; Developing Countries/*economics; Educational Status; Europe; Female; Humans; Latin America; Marital Status/statistics & numerical data; Parity/physiology; Poverty/psychology/*statistics & numerical data; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy, Unplanned  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In 2010-2014, approximately 86% of abortions took place in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although abortion incidence varies minimally across geographical regions, it varies widely by subregion and within countries by subgroups of women. Differential abortion levels stem from variation in the level of unintended pregnancies and in the likelihood that women with unintended pregnancies obtain abortions. OBJECTIVES: To examine the characteristics of women obtaining induced abortions in LMICs. METHODS: We use data from official statistics, population-based surveys, and abortion patient surveys to examine variation in the percentage distribution of abortions and abortion rates by age at abortion, marital status, parity, wealth, education, and residence. We analyze data from five countries in Africa, 13 in Asia, eight in Europe, and two in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). RESULTS: Women across all sociodemographic subgroups obtain abortions. In most countries, women aged 20-29 obtained the highest proportion of abortions, and while adolescents obtained a substantial fraction of abortions, they do not make up a disproportionate share. Region-specific patterns were observed in the distribution of abortions by parity. In many countries, a higher fraction of abortions occurred among women of high socioeconomic status, as measured by wealth status, educational attainment, and urban residence. Due to limited data on marital status, it is unknown whether married or unmarried women make up a larger share of abortions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings help to identify subgroups of women with disproportionate levels of abortion, and can inform policies and programs to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancies; and in LMICs that have restrictive abortion laws, these findings can also inform policies to minimize the consequences of unsafe abortion and motivate liberalization of abortion laws. Program planners, policymakers, and advocates can use this information to improve access to safe abortion services, postabortion care, and contraceptive services.  
  Address Guttmacher Institute, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28355285 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97641  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Azoulay, M.; Santos, F.; Shenouda, G.; Petrecca, K.; Oweida, A.; Guiot, M.C.; Owen, S.; Panet-Raymond, V.; Souhami, L.; Abdulkarim, B.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Benefit of re-operation and salvage therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: results from a single institution Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Neurooncol  
  Volume 132 Issue 3 Pages 419-426  
  Keywords Bevacizumab; Glioblastoma; Radiation; Recurrence; Surgery; Temozolomide  
  Abstract The optimal management of recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) has yet to be determined. We aim to assess the benefits of re-operation and salvage therapies (chemotherapy and/or re-irradiation) for recurrent GBM and to identify prognostic factors associated with better survival. All patients who underwent surgery for GBM between January 2005 and December 2012 followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and who developed GBM recurrence on imaging were included in this retrospective study. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox models in order to identify factors associated with overall survival (OS). One hundred and eighty patients treated to a dose of 60 Gy were diagnosed with recurrent GBM. At a median follow-up time of 6.2 months, the median survival (MS) from time of recurrence was 6.6 months. Sixty-nine patients underwent repeat surgery for recurrence based on imaging. To establish the benefits of repeat surgery and salvage therapies, 68 patients who underwent repeat surgery were matched to patients who did not based on extent of initial resection and presence of subventricular zone involvement at recurrence. MS for patients who underwent re-operation was 9.6 months, compared to 5.3 months for patients who did not have repeat surgery (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis in the matched pairs confirmed that repeat surgery with the addition of other salvage treatment can significantly affect patient outcome (HR 0.53). Re-operation with additional salvage therapies for recurrent GBM provides survival prolongation at the time of progression.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Cancer Centre, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada. bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-594X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28374095 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96599  
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