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Author Perez-Martinez, P.J.; de Fatima Andrade, M.; de Miranda, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Heavy truck restrictions and air quality implications in Sao Paulo, Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume (down) 202 Issue Pt 1 Pages 55-68  
  Keywords Air pollution trends; Sao Paulo; Traffic-pollutant relationships; Transport emission factors  
  Abstract This study quantified the effects of traffic restrictions on diesel fuel heavy vehicles (HVs) on the air quality of the Bandeirantes corridor using hourly data obtained by continuous monitoring of traffic and air quality at sites located on this avenue. The study addressed the air quality of a city impacted by vehicular emissions and that PM10 and NOX concentrations are mainly due to diesel burning. Data collection was split into two time periods, a period of no traffic constraint on HVs (Nov 2008 and 2009) and a period of constraint (Nov 2010, 2011 and 2012). We found that pollutants on this corridor, mainly PM10 and NOX, decreased significantly during the period from 2008 to 2012 (28 and 43%, 15.8 and 86.9 ppb) as a direct consequence of HV traffic restrictions (a 72% reduction). Rebound effects in the form of increased traffic of light vehicles (LVs) during this time had impacts on the concentration levels, explaining the differences between rates of reduction in HV traffic and pollutants. Reductions in the number of trucks resulted in longer travel times and increased traffic congestion as a consequence of the modal shift towards LVs. We found that a 51% decrease in PM10 (28.8 mug m-3) was due to a reduction in HV traffic (vehicle emissions were estimated to be 71% of total sources, 40.1 mug m-3). This percentage was partially offset by 10% more PM10 emissions related to an increase in LV traffic, while other causes, such as climatic conditions, contributed to a 13% increase in PM10 concentrations. The relationships analyzed in this research served to highlight the need to apply urban transport policies aimed at decreasing pollutant concentrations in Sao Paulo, especially in heavily congested urban corridors on working days.  
  Address School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28719822 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97508  
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Author LaGrone, L.N.; Isquith-Dicker, L.N.; Huaman Egoavil, E.; Rodriguez Castro, M.J.A.; Allagual, A.; Revoredo, F.; Mock, C.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Surgeons' and Trauma Care Physicians' Perception of the Impact of the Globalization of Medical Education on Quality of Care in Lima, Peru Type Observational Study
  Year 2017 Publication JAMA Surgery Abbreviated Journal JAMA Surg  
  Volume (down) 152 Issue 3 Pages 251-256  
  Keywords *Attitude of Health Personnel; *Developing Countries; Education, Distance; *Education, Medical; Faculty, Medical/psychology; General Surgery/*education/standards; Humans; International Educational Exchange; Internationality; Internship and Residency; Interviews as Topic; Perception; Peru; Qualitative Research; *Quality of Health Care; Surgeons/*psychology; *Traumatology  
  Abstract Importance: The globalization of medical education-the process by which trainees in any region gain access to international training (electronic or in-person)-is a growing trend. More data are needed to inform next steps in the responsible stewardship of this process, from the perspective of trainees and institutions at all income levels, and for use by national and international policymakers. Objective: To describe the impact of the globalization of medical education on surgical care in Peru from the perspective of Peruvian surgeons who received international training. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study of qualitative interviews conducted from September 2015 to January 2016 using grounded theory qualitative research methods. The study was conducted at 10 large public institutions that provide most of the trauma care in Lima, Peru, and included urban resident and faculty surgery and trauma care physicians. Exposures: Access to international surgical rotations and medical information. Main Outcomes and Measures: Outcome measures defining the impact of globalization on surgical care were developed as part of simultaneous data collection and analysis during qualitative research as part of a larger project on trauma quality improvement practices in Peru. Results: Fifty qualitative interviews of surgeons and emergency medicine physicians were conducted at 10 hospitals, including multiple from the public and social security systems. A median of 4 interviews were conducted at each hospital, and fewer than 3 interviews were conducted at only 1 hospital. From the broader theme of globalization emerged subthemes of an eroded sense of agency and a perception of inadequate training on the adaptation of international standards as negative effects of globalization on surgical care in Peru. Access to research funds, provision of incentives for acquisition of advanced clinical training, increased expectations for patient outcomes, and education in quality improvement skills are ways in which globalization positively affected surgeons and their patients in Peru. Conclusions and Relevance: Short-term overseas training of surgeons from low- and middle-income countries may improve care in the surgeons' country of origin through the acquisition of skills and altered expectations for excellence. Prioritization of evidence-based medical education is necessary given widespread internet access and thus clinician exposure to variable quality medical information. Finally, the establishment of centers of excellence in low- and middle-income countries may address the eroded sense of agency attributable to globalization and offer a local example of world-class surgical outcomes, diminishing surgeons' most frequently cited reason for emigration: access to better surgical training.  
  Address University of Washington, Seattle  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6254 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27893012 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97649  
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Author Griboff, J.; Horacek, M.; Wunderlin, D.A.; Monferran, M.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of metals, As and Se through a freshwater food web affected by antrophic pollution in Cordoba, Argentina Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Abbreviated Journal Ecotoxicol Environ Saf  
  Volume (down) 148 Issue Pages 275-284  
  Keywords Aquatic organisms; As; Biomagnification; Food web; Metals; Stable isotopes  
  Abstract The concentration of metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, U), As and Se in different ecosystem components (water, sediment, plankton, shrimp, and fish muscle) has been determined in a eutrophic reservoir in the Province of Cordoba (Argentina). Los Molinos Lake (LML) was sampled during the dry (DS) and wet seasons (WS) in order to examine the bioaccumulation and transfer of these inorganic elements through the food web. Stable nitrogen isotope (delta15N) was used to investigate trophic interactions. According to this, samples were divided into three categories: plankton, shrimp (Palaemonetes argentinus) and fish (Silverside, Odontesthes bonariensis). The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) was calculated for the organisms, and it was determined that the elements analyzed undergo bioaccumulation, especially in organisms such as plankton. The invertebrates were characterized by the highest BAF for Cu and Zn in both seasons, As (DS), and Cd and Hg (WS). The fish muscle was characterized by the highest BAF for Se (WS), Ag and Hg (DS). On the other hand, a significant decrease in Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and U concentrations through the analyzed trophic web during both seasons was observed. Moreover, a significant increase in Hg levels was observed with increasing trophic levels in the DS, indicating its biomagnification. Despite the increasing impact of metals, As and Se pollution in the studied area due to urban growth and agricultural and livestock activities, no previous study has focused on the behavior and relationships of these pollutants with the biotic and abiotic components of this aquatic reservoir. We expect that these findings may be used for providing directions or guidance for future monitoring and environmental protection policies.  
  Address ICYTAC, Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos Cordoba, CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Bv. Dr. Juan Filloy s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba, Argentina. Electronic address: mmonferran@fcq.unc.edu.ar  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0147-6513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29078130 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98006  
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Author Heffernan, J.M.; McNamara, J.B.; Borwege, S.; Vernon, B.L.; Sanai, N.; Mehta, S.; Sirianni, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title PNIPAAm-co-Jeffamine(R) (PNJ) scaffolds as in vitro models for niche enrichment of glioblastoma stem-like cells Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Biomaterials Abbreviated Journal Biomaterials  
  Volume (down) 143 Issue Pages 149-158  
  Keywords Brain tumor initiating cells; Cancer stem cells; Radioresistance; Temperature responsive polymer scaffolds; Tissue engineering  
  Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common adult primary brain tumor, and the 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. GBM malignancy is driven in part by a population of GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) that exhibit indefinite self-renewal capacity, multipotent differentiation, expression of neural stem cell markers, and resistance to conventional treatments. GSCs are enriched in specialized niche microenvironments that regulate stem phenotypes and support GSC radioresistance. Therefore, identifying GSC-niche interactions that regulate stem phenotypes may present a unique target for disrupting the maintenance and persistence of this treatment resistant population. In this work, we engineered 3D scaffolds from temperature responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Jeffamine M-1000(R) acrylamide), or PNJ copolymers, as a platform for enriching stem-specific phenotypes in two molecularly distinct human patient-derived GSC cell lines. Notably, we observed that, compared to conventional neurosphere cultures, PNJ cultured GSCs maintained multipotency and exhibited enhanced self-renewal capacity. Concurrent increases in expression of proteins known to regulate self-renewal, invasion, and stem maintenance in GSCs (NESTIN, EGFR, CD44) suggest that PNJ scaffolds effectively enrich the GSC population. We further observed that PNJ cultured GSCs exhibited increased resistance to radiation treatment compared to GSCs cultured in standard neurosphere conditions. GSC radioresistance is supported in vivo by niche microenvironments, and this remains a significant barrier to effectively treating these highly tumorigenic cells. Taken in sum, these data indicate that the microenvironment created by synthetic PNJ scaffolds models niche enrichment of GSCs in patient-derived GBM cell lines, and presents tissue engineering opportunities for studying clinically important behaviors such as radioresistance in vitro.  
  Address Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center, Barrow Neurological Institute, 350 W Thomas Ave, Phoenix, AZ, 85013, USA; School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, PO Box 879709, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA. Electronic address: rachael.sirianni@dignityhealth.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0142-9612 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28802102 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96570  
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Author Jahan, N.; Lee, J.M.; Shah, K.; Wakimoto, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic targeting of chemoresistant and recurrent glioblastoma stem cells with a proapoptotic variant of oncolytic herpes simplex virus Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume (down) 141 Issue 8 Pages 1671-1681  
  Keywords Animals; Apoptosis/physiology; Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy/*therapy/virology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cohort Studies; Dacarbazine/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Glioblastoma/drug therapy/*therapy/virology; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Mice; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy/therapy/virology; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/pathology/*virology; Oncolytic Virotherapy/*methods; Simplexvirus/genetics/*physiology; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand/biosynthesis/genetics; TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL); glioblastoma; oncolytic herpes simplex virus; recurrence; temozolomide  
  Abstract Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy, in combination with maximal safe resection and radiotherapy, is the current standard of care for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Despite this multimodal approach, GBM inevitably relapses primarily due to resistance to chemo-radiotherapy, and effective treatment is not available for recurrent disease. In this study we identified TMZ resistant patient-derived primary and previously treated recurrent GBM stem cells (GSC), and investigated the therapeutic activity of a pro-apoptotic variant of oHSV (oHSV-TRAIL) in vitro and in vivo. We show that oHSV-TRAIL modulates cell survival and MAP Kinase proliferation signaling pathways as well as DNA damage response pathways in both primary and recurrent TMZ-resistant GSC. Utilizing real time in vivo imaging and correlative immunohistochemistry, we show that oHSV-TRAIL potently inhibits tumor growth and extends survival of mice bearing TMZ-insensitive recurrent intracerebral GSC tumors via robust and selective induction of apoptosis-mediated death in tumor cells, resulting in cures in 40% of the treated mice. In comparison, the anti-tumor effects in a primary chemoresistant GSC GBM model exhibiting a highly invasive phenotype were significant but less prominent. This work thus demonstrates the ability of oHSV-TRAIL to overcome the therapeutic resistance and recurrence of GBM, and provides a basis for its testing in a GBM clinical trial.  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28567859 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96584  
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