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Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume (down) 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97506  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godin, K.M.; Chacon, V.; Barnoya, J.; Leatherdale, S.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The school environment and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among Guatemalan adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Public Health Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Public Health Nutr  
  Volume (down) 20 Issue 16 Pages 2980-2987  
  Keywords Latin America; Nutrition policy; School health; Sugar-sweetened beverages  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study sought to examine Guatemalan adolescents' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), identify which individual-level characteristics are associated with SSB consumption and describe school characteristics that may influence students' SSB consumption. DESIGN: Within this observational pilot study, a questionnaire was used to assess students' consumption of three varieties of SSB (soft drinks, energy drinks, sweetened coffees/teas), as well as a variety of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. We collected built environment data to examine aspects of the school food environment. We developed Poisson regression models for each SSB variety and used descriptive analyses to characterize the sample. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. SUBJECTS: Guatemalan adolescents (n 1042) from four (two public, two private) secondary schools. RESULTS: Built environment data revealed that students from the two public schools lacked access to water fountains/coolers. The SSB industry had a presence in the schools through advertisements, sponsored food kiosks and products available for sale. Common correlates of SSB consumption included school type, sedentary behaviour, frequency of purchasing lunch in the cafeteria, and frequency of purchasing snacks from vending machines in school and off school property. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan adolescents frequently consume SSB, which may be encouraged by aspects of the school environment. Schools represent a viable setting for equitable population health interventions designed to reduce SSB consumption, including increasing access to clean drinking-water, reducing access to SSB, restricting SSB marketing and greater enforcement of existing food policies.  
  Address 1School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West,Waterloo,ON,Canada,N2L 3G1  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1368-9800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28803573 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98008  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, A.A.; Abrey, L.E.; Terziev, R.; Raizer, J.; Martinez, N.L.; Forsyth, P.; Paleologos, N.; Matasar, M.; Sauter, C.S.; Moskowitz, C.; Nimer, S.D.; DeAngelis, L.M.; Kaley, T.; Grimm, S.; Louis, D.N.; Cairncross, J.G.; Panageas, K.S.; Briggs, S.; Faivre, G.; Mohile, N.A.; Mehta, J.; Jonsson, P.; Chakravarty, D.; Gao, J.; Schultz, N.; Brennan, C.W.; Huse, J.T.; Omuro, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multicenter phase II study of temozolomide and myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant for newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume (down) 19 Issue 10 Pages 1380-1390  
  Keywords 1p/19q codeletion; anaplastic oligodendroglioma; autologous stem cell transplant; temozolomide  
  Abstract Background: Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) are chemotherapy-sensitive tumors with prolonged survival after radiochemotherapy. We report a prospective trial using induction temozolomide (TMZ) followed by myeloablative high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT) as a potential strategy to defer radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with AO/AOA received 6 cycles of TMZ (200 mg/m2 x 5/28 day). Responding patients were eligible for HDC (thiotepa 250 mg/m2/day x 3 days, then busulfan 3.2 mg/kg/day x 3 days), followed by ASCT. Genomic characterization was performed using next-generation sequencing. Results: Forty-one patients were enrolled; 85% had 1p/19q codeleted tumors. After induction, 26 patients were eligible for HDC-ASCT and 21 agreed to proceed. There were no unexpected adverse events or toxic deaths. After median follow-up of 66 months, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) for transplanted patients was 86%, 5-year PFS 60%, and no patient has died. Among all 1p/19q codeleted patients (N = 33), 5-year PFS was 50% and 5-year overall survival (OS) 93%, with median time to radiotherapy not reached. Next-generation sequencing disclosed typical oligodendroglioma-related mutations, including IDH1, TERT, CIC, and FUBP1 mutations in 1p/19q codeleted patients, and glioblastoma-like signatures in 1p/19q intact patients. Aside from IDH1, potentially oncogenic/actionable mutations were variable, depicting wide molecular heterogeneity within oligodendroglial tumors. Conclusions: TMZ followed by HDC-ASCT can be safely administered to patients with newly diagnosed 1p/19q codeleted AO. This strategy was associated with promising PFS and OS, suggesting that a chemotherapy-based approach may delay the need for radiotherapy and radiation-related toxicities. Raw data for further genomic and meta-analyses are publicly available at http://cbioportal.org/study?id=odgmsk2017, accessed 6 January 2017. Clinicaltrials.gov registry: NCT00588523.  
  Address Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York,USA; Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA; NorthShore University, Evanston, Illinois,USA; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28472509 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96586  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shahar, T.; Rozovski, U.; Hess, K.R.; Hossain, A.; Gumin, J.; Gao, F.; Fuller, G.N.; Goodman, L.; Sulman, E.P.; Lang, F.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Percentage of mesenchymal stem cells in high-grade glioma tumor samples correlates with patient survival Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume (down) 19 Issue 5 Pages 660-668  
  Keywords *glioblastoma; *mesenchymal stem cells; *microenvironment; *prognosis  
  Abstract Background: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to reside as stromal cells in human gliomas as glioma-associated hMSCs (GA-hMSCs), but their biological role remains unclear. Because recent evidence indicates that GA-hMSCs drive tumor cell proliferation and stemness, we hypothesized that a higher percentage of GA-hMSCs in tumors predicts poor patient prognosis. Method: We determined the percentage of cells coexpressing GA-hMSC markers CD105+/CD73+/CD90+ from patients with newly diagnosed high-grade glioma and analyzed the association between this percentage and overall survival (OS) in 3 independent cohorts: fresh surgical glioblastoma specimens (cohort 1, N = 9), cultured tumor specimens at passage 3 (cohort 2, N = 28), and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Results: In all cohorts, patient OS correlated with the percentages of GA-hMSCs in tumors. For cohort 1, the median OS of patients with tumors with a low percentage of triple-positive cells was 46 months, and for tumors with a high percentage of triple-positive cells, it was 12 months (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.02-0.5, P = .02). For cohort 2, the median OS of patients with tumors with a low percentage of GA-hMSCs was 66 months, and for tumors with a high percentage, it was 11 months (HR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.13-0.9, P = .04). In the database of TCGA, the median OS times in patients with high and low coexpression levels of CD105/CD73/CD90 were 8.4 months and 13.1 months (HR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1-0.88; P = .04), respectively. Conclusions: The percentage of GA-MSCs inversely correlates with OS, suggesting a role for GA-MSCs in promoting aggressive behavior of gliomas.  
  Address Brain Tumor Center, Unit 442, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28453745 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96589  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author D'Alessandris, Q.G.; Biffoni, M.; Martini, M.; Runci, D.; Buccarelli, M.; Cenci, T.; Signore, M.; Stancato, L.; Olivi, A.; De Maria, R.; Larocca, L.M.; Ricci-Vitiani, L.; Pallini, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The clinical value of patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres in predicting treatment response Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neuro-Oncology Abbreviated Journal Neuro Oncol  
  Volume (down) 19 Issue 8 Pages 1097-1108  
  Keywords cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; radiotherapy; temozolomide; treatment outcome  
  Abstract Background: Advances from glioma stemlike cell (GSC) research, though increasing our knowledge of glioblastoma (GBM) biology, do not influence clinical decisions yet. We explored the translational power of GSC-enriched cultures from patient-derived tumorspheres (TS) in predicting treatment response. Methods: The relationship between TS growth and clinical outcome was investigated in 52 GBMs treated with surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). The effect on TS of radiation (6 to 60 Gy) and of TMZ (3.9 muM to 1 mM) was related with patients' survival. Results: Generation of TS was an independent factor for poor overall survival (OS) and poor progression-free survival (PFS) (P < .0001 and P = .0010, respectively). Growth rate and clonogenicity of TS predicted poor OS. In general, TS were highly resistant to both radiation and TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was stronger in TS with high clonogenicity and fast growth (P < .02). Shorter PFS was associated with radiation LD50 (lethal dose required to kill 50% of TS cells) >12 Gy of matched TS (P = .0484). A direct relationship was found between sensitivity of TS to TMZ and patients' survival (P = .0167 and P = .0436 for OS and PFS, respectively). Importantly, values for TMZ half-maximal inhibitory concentration <50 muM, which are in the range of plasma levels achieved in vivo, identified cases with longer OS and PFS (P = .0020 and P = .0016, respectively). Conclusions: Analysis of TS holds translational relevance by predicting the response of parent tumors to radiation and, particularly, to TMZ. Dissecting the clonogenic population from proliferating progeny in TS can guide therapeutic strategies to a more effective drug selection and treatment duration.  
  Address Institute of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy; Institute of Pathology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, Indiana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1522-8517 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28204560 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96607  
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